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When I have data relevant to a function that is independent of its arguments, when should I favor block encapsulation over local encapsulation?

When should I use:

(let [hello "Hello "]
  (defn do-greet
    "Print a greeting."
    [name]
    (println (str hello name))))

Versus:

(defn do-greet
  "Print a greeting."
  [name]
  (let [hello "Hello "]
    (println (str hello name))))
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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The former is a reasonable option if you want to use the value like a static constant within a lexically scoped block of code. Typically you would do this if:

  • The value is expensive to compute, and you want to do it only once when the namespace is loaded
  • The value is genuinely constant, i.e. will not change across function invocations
  • The value will be used across multiple function definitions (i.e. you put multiple defns inside the let block)
  • (Possibly?) because you want to use the value inside a macro expansion, and embedding the let inside the macro expansion itself would add unnecessary complexity.

The latter version should probably be preferred in most other cases, it is good for several reasons:

  • It is more idiomatic
  • It allows the function definition to be at the top level, which is better for code readability / comprehension
  • It allows the value to vary on different function invocations
  • It better reflects the intent of using the value in a local context
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I like this, you cover more points. I'm not sure your macro expansion point is valid since you can wrap the let around the expansion but still be inside the function. For readability, I suggest separating stylistic choices from semantic differences. (Value can vary on different function invocations). –  bmillare Nov 3 '12 at 14:11

It's a stylistic choice, and one that should probably depend at least a little on how expensive the value is to compute. Consider instead:

(defn nth-prime [n] ...)

(defn f [x]
  (let [factor (nth-prime 10000)]
    (* x factor)))

(let [factor (nth-prime 10000)]
  (defn g [x]
    (* x factor)))

Recomputing an expensive constant every time f is called is wasteful, and g uses a simple technique to avoid doing it.

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2  
By saying there is a difference in runtime behavior (performance), I'd argue its NOT a stylistic choice. Only because in the asker's example, there is practically no difference, that it is stylistic. –  bmillare Nov 3 '12 at 0:10

If hello is only used in that one single function, it makes more sense to put the let inside the function itself. If you were going to be using hello in multiple functions, it'd make sense to have the let outside of and wrapped around those functions.

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If the two are not equivalent at runtime, I'd argue that we should not be deciding just based on style. Imagine instead that the binding was to read a static resource (let [hello (slurp (clojure.java.io/resource "hello"))] ...). I've left my question more general because I don't know how those forms actually evaluate and what the corresponding tradeoffs are. –  ToBeReplaced Nov 2 '12 at 22:01
1  
It doesn't really have anything to do with style in some cases. If you need the value to be available in two different functions, you have to make the value available above the scope of those functions. Also, see @amalloy's answer. –  Rayne Nov 2 '12 at 22:04

Definitely this:

(defn do-greet
  "Print a greeting."
  [name]
  (let [hello "Hello "]
    (println (str hello name))))
share|improve this answer

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