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Consider the following simple program:

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
        char buffer[256];

        buffer[0] = 0x41;
        buffer[128] = 0x41;
        buffer[255] = 0x41;

        return 0;
}

Compiled with GCC 4.7.0 on a x86-64 machine. Disassembly of main() with GDB gives:

0x00000000004004cc <+0>:     push   rbp
0x00000000004004cd <+1>:     mov    rbp,rsp
0x00000000004004d0 <+4>:     sub    rsp,0x98
0x00000000004004d7 <+11>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rbp-0x104],edi
0x00000000004004dd <+17>:    mov    QWORD PTR [rbp-0x110],rsi
0x00000000004004e4 <+24>:    mov    BYTE PTR [rbp-0x100],0x41
0x00000000004004eb <+31>:    mov    BYTE PTR [rbp-0x80],0x41
0x00000000004004ef <+35>:    mov    BYTE PTR [rbp-0x1],0x41
0x00000000004004f3 <+39>:    mov    eax,0x0
0x00000000004004f8 <+44>:    leave  
0x00000000004004f9 <+45>:    ret    

Why does it sub rsp with only 0x98 = 152d when the buffer is 256 byte? When I mov data into buffer[0] it simply seems to use data outside of the allocated stack frame and use rbp to reference, so what is even the point of the sub rsp,0x98?

Another question, what do these lines do?

0x00000000004004d7 <+11>:    mov    DWORD PTR [rbp-0x104],edi
0x00000000004004dd <+17>:    mov    QWORD PTR [rbp-0x110],rsi

Why does EDI and not RDI need to be saved? I see that it moves this outside of the maximum range of the allocated buffer in the C code however. Also of interest is why the delta between the two variables is so big. Since EDI is just 4 bytes, why does it need a 12 byte separation for the two variables?

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2  
The 12 byte separation is due to alignment. rsi is 8 bytes, so padding is needed to keep it aligned to 8 bytes. But I can't speak for the under-allocation of the stack. –  Mysticial Nov 2 '12 at 19:21
    
It probably saves EDI and RSI simply because it is not required to save these by the caller? But still the manner in which they are saved seems weird. –  csstudent2233 Nov 2 '12 at 19:22
    
what happens when you compile it with gcc -s (to get assembly output) - because if you don't have debugging turned on in the compilation in the first place, your gdb results can be odd –  KevinDTimm Nov 2 '12 at 19:22
    
When I compile with gcc -S to get assembly output I simply see reproduced results. –  csstudent2233 Nov 2 '12 at 19:30
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1 Answer

up vote 10 down vote accepted

The x86-64 ABI used by Linux (and some other OSes, although notably not Windows, which has its own different ABI) defines a "red zone" of 128 bytes below the stack pointer, which is guaranteed not to be touched by signal or interrupt handlers. (See figure 3.3 and §3.2.2.)

A leaf function (i.e. one which does not call anything else) may therefore use this area for whatever it wants - it isn't doing anything like a call which would place data at the stack pointer; and any signal or interrupt handler will follow the ABI and drop the stack pointer by at least an additional 128 bytes before storing anything.

(Shorter instruction encodings are available for signed 8-bit displacements, so the point of the red zone is that it increases the amount of local data that a leaf function can access using these shorter instructions.)

That's what's happening here.

But... this code isn't making use of those shorter encodings (it's using offsets from rbp rather than rsp). Why not? It's also saving edi and rsi completely unnecessarily - you ask why it's saving edi instead of rdi, but why is it saving it at all?

The answer is that the compiler is generating really crummy code, because no optimisations are enabled. If you enable any optimisation, your entire function is likely to collapse down to:

mov eax, 0
ret

because that's really all it needs to do: buffer[] is local, so the changes made to it will never be visible to anything else, so can be optimised away; beyond that, all the function needs to do is return 0.


So, here's a better example. This function is complete nonsense, but makes use of a similar array, whilst doing enough to ensure that things don't all get optimised away:

$ cat test.c
int foo(char *bar)
{
    char tmp[256];
    int i;

    for (i = 0; bar[i] != 0; i++)
      tmp[i] = bar[i] + i;

    return tmp[1] + tmp[200];
}

Compiled with some optimisation, you can see similar use of the red zone, except this time it really does use offsets from rsp:

$ gcc -m64 -O1 -c test.c
$ objdump -Mintel -d test.o

test.o:     file format elf64-x86-64


Disassembly of section .text:

0000000000000000 <foo>:
   0:   53                      push   rbx
   1:   48 81 ec 88 00 00 00    sub    rsp,0x88
   8:   0f b6 17                movzx  edx,BYTE PTR [rdi]
   b:   84 d2                   test   dl,dl
   d:   74 26                   je     35 <foo+0x35>
   f:   4c 8d 44 24 88          lea    r8,[rsp-0x78]
  14:   48 8d 4f 01             lea    rcx,[rdi+0x1]
  18:   4c 89 c0                mov    rax,r8
  1b:   89 c3                   mov    ebx,eax
  1d:   44 28 c3                sub    bl,r8b
  20:   89 de                   mov    esi,ebx
  22:   01 f2                   add    edx,esi
  24:   88 10                   mov    BYTE PTR [rax],dl
  26:   0f b6 11                movzx  edx,BYTE PTR [rcx]
  29:   48 83 c0 01             add    rax,0x1
  2d:   48 83 c1 01             add    rcx,0x1
  31:   84 d2                   test   dl,dl
  33:   75 e6                   jne    1b <foo+0x1b>
  35:   0f be 54 24 50          movsx  edx,BYTE PTR [rsp+0x50]
  3a:   0f be 44 24 89          movsx  eax,BYTE PTR [rsp-0x77]
  3f:   8d 04 02                lea    eax,[rdx+rax*1]
  42:   48 81 c4 88 00 00 00    add    rsp,0x88
  49:   5b                      pop    rbx
  4a:   c3                      ret    

Now let's tweak it very slightly, by inserting a call to another function, so that foo() is no longer a leaf function:

$ cat test.c
extern void dummy(void);  /* ADDED */

int foo(char *bar)
{
    char tmp[256];
    int i;

    for (i = 0; bar[i] != 0; i++)
      tmp[i] = bar[i] + i;

    dummy();  /* ADDED */

    return tmp[1] + tmp[200];
}

Now the red zone cannot be used, so you see something more like you originally expected:

$ gcc -m64 -O1 -c test.c
$ objdump -Mintel -d test.o

test.o:     file format elf64-x86-64


Disassembly of section .text:

0000000000000000 <foo>:
   0:   53                      push   rbx
   1:   48 81 ec 00 01 00 00    sub    rsp,0x100
   8:   0f b6 17                movzx  edx,BYTE PTR [rdi]
   b:   84 d2                   test   dl,dl
   d:   74 24                   je     33 <foo+0x33>
   f:   49 89 e0                mov    r8,rsp
  12:   48 8d 4f 01             lea    rcx,[rdi+0x1]
  16:   48 89 e0                mov    rax,rsp
  19:   89 c3                   mov    ebx,eax
  1b:   44 28 c3                sub    bl,r8b
  1e:   89 de                   mov    esi,ebx
  20:   01 f2                   add    edx,esi
  22:   88 10                   mov    BYTE PTR [rax],dl
  24:   0f b6 11                movzx  edx,BYTE PTR [rcx]
  27:   48 83 c0 01             add    rax,0x1
  2b:   48 83 c1 01             add    rcx,0x1
  2f:   84 d2                   test   dl,dl
  31:   75 e6                   jne    19 <foo+0x19>
  33:   e8 00 00 00 00          call   38 <foo+0x38>
  38:   0f be 94 24 c8 00 00    movsx  edx,BYTE PTR [rsp+0xc8]
  3f:   00 
  40:   0f be 44 24 01          movsx  eax,BYTE PTR [rsp+0x1]
  45:   8d 04 02                lea    eax,[rdx+rax*1]
  48:   48 81 c4 00 01 00 00    add    rsp,0x100
  4f:   5b                      pop    rbx
  50:   c3                      ret    

(Note that tmp[200] was in range of a signed 8-bit displacement in the first case, but is not in this one.)

share|improve this answer
    
Excellent illustrative answer. Particularly the observation that with optimization, it should simply set eax=0 and return. –  Brett Hale Nov 3 '12 at 5:47
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