Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to create an array to hold an int, then when another int is to be added increase it in size to hold another int.. and so on..

I know it's not an efficient use of realloc, but it's proof on concept more than anything else. Just to get it working would allow me to optimise it and be able to apply it to something useful. A working example. The problem comes when i call the print function and it just segfaults. Any help would be appreciated.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <string.h>

typedef char String[100];

void begin(int *);
void add(int *, int);
void print(int *);

int tempcount=0;

int main(void)
{
    int *n=NULL;
    String menu;

    begin(n);

    while(true)
    {
        scanf("%9s", menu);

        if(!strcmp("a", menu)) //add
        {
            int i=0;
            scanf("%d", &i);
            add(n, i);
        }
        else if(!strcmp("p", menu)) //print
        {
            print(n);
        }
        else if(!strcmp("q", menu)) //quit
        {
            free(n);
            break;
        }

    }

    return 0;
}

void begin(int *n)
{
    n=malloc(sizeof(int));

    if(n==NULL)
    {
        printf("Error in malloc!");
        return;
    }

    n[0]=0;

    printf("Added %d \n", n[0]);
}

void add(int *n, int numToAdd)
{
    static int sizeCount=0;
    sizeCount++;
    tempcount=sizeCount;

    int *temp;

    temp=realloc(n, (sizeCount+1) * sizeof(int));

    if(temp==NULL)
    {
        printf("Error in realloc!");
        return;
    }

    n=temp;

    n[sizeCount]=numToAdd;

    printf("Added %d \n", n[sizeCount]);

}

void print(int *n)
{
    int i;
    for(i=0; i<tempcount; i++)
    {
        printf("%d ", n[i]);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Why do you think realloc returns a pointer? –  n.m. Nov 2 '12 at 19:25
4  
because it does? –  hexist Nov 2 '12 at 19:27
    
This is related and thus of interest: stackoverflow.com/q/13098037/856199 –  Nikos C. Nov 2 '12 at 19:28
2  
@n.m.: realloc returns a pointer because it can't guarantee the "resized" block of memory will be in the same spot as the old. If it has to move the block, it needs some way to tell you where the new block is. –  cHao Nov 2 '12 at 19:32
1  
@n.m. Next time ask "What do you think is the reason..." to prevent misunderstandings. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 2 '12 at 19:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You need to pass a pointer to your pointers in add/begin so they can modify your pointer in main

begin(&n);
...
add(&n, i);

and your definition

void begin(int **n)
{
    *n=malloc(sizeof(int));

    if(*n==NULL)
    {
        printf("Error in malloc!");
        return;
    }

    (*n)[0]=0;

    printf("Added %d \n", (*n)[0]);
}

and

void add(int **n, int numToAdd)
{
    static int sizeCount=0;
    sizeCount++;
    tempcount=sizeCount;

    int *temp;

    temp=realloc(*n, (sizeCount+1) * sizeof(int));

    if(temp==NULL)
    {
        printf("Error in realloc!");
        return;
    }

    *n=temp;

    (*n)[sizeCount]=numToAdd;

    printf("Added %d \n", (*n)[sizeCount]);

}

Right now what you're doing is modifying local copies of your pointer in begin/add, so when you change it in those functions it's not modifying your pointer n in main

Also, fun fact, if you pass NULL as the first parameter to realloc it acts like a malloc, so if you initialize n to NULL, you can simply call add without first doing a begin.

share|improve this answer
    
The same, passing the array by reference, has to be done for the add function as well. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 2 '12 at 19:28
    
@hexist: Hey, thanks a lot for your answer, it really helped and i have the program working! Thanks! –  Draconian Times Nov 2 '12 at 19:40

Check your function add - are you sure you update the pointer value? Try with ** as a parameter - I think it will help.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.