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I was practicing pipes in system programming when i realized that my program isn't exiting. I added exit() in both child and parent, but the child still isn't exiting. Please help... Here is the code:

#include<stdlib.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<unistd.h>
//#include "apue.h"

main() {
        int n,max=20;
        pid_t pid;
        int fd[2];
        char line[max];
        int i;
        for(i=0;i<20;i++) {
            line[i]='\0';
        }

        if(pipe(fd)<0) {
            perror("pipe error");
        }
        if((pid=fork())<0) {
            perror("fork error");
        }
        else if(pid > 0) {
            close(fd[0]);
            write(fd[1], "hello world\n", 12);
            exit(1);
        } else {
            close(fd[1]);
            read(fd[0], line, max);
        }
        puts(line);
        exit(1);
}
share|improve this question
2  
How do you know it's not exiting? What's the behavior that you get and what is that you would expect? –  user529758 Nov 2 '12 at 20:05
    
exit(0) is preferable... –  0x90 Nov 2 '12 at 20:10
2  
well, exit(EXIT_FAILURE) is preferable, if that's the meaning... –  effeffe Nov 2 '12 at 20:17
    
@H2CO3, the terminal is going blank. like the way it happens in an infinite loop... the "user@user$" thing that comes where we enter commands is not coming back, which is suppose to after the complete termination of the program –  haris Nov 2 '12 at 20:26
1  
Check your terminal output. I bet you are getting the user@user$ command prompt, but it's mixed in with the program output because the parent exits before the child, and the shell only waits for the parent process before it prints the next prompt. –  Adam Rosenfield Nov 2 '12 at 20:43

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First of all, fork returns 0 in the child not in the parrent. So, when you write

else if(pid > 0) {

       close(fd[0]);
       write(fd[1], "hello world\n", 12);
        exit(1); }

You are in the parrent process. To be in the child process space, you shoud use else if(pid **==** 0)

The seccond thing you should do to make sure everything works fine, you should not call in the child process code space the function exit(). You would better wait your child process in the parrent process. For this you should use the wait() function in the parrent process.

The good code would be:

main() {
    int n,max=20;
    pid_t pid;
    int fd[2];
    char line[max];
    int i;
    int status;
    for(i=0;i<20;i++) {
        line[i]='\0';
    }
        if(pipe(fd)<0) {
        perror("pipe error");
    }
    pid=fork();
    if(pid <0) {
        perror("fork error");
    }
    else if(pid == 0) { // Here is the child process
        close(fd[0]);
        write(fd[1], "hello world\n", 12);
        **// Do not kill child process because is dangeorus to do this when you use pipes**
    } else { // Parrent process
        close(fd[1]);
        read(fd[0], line, max);
        puts(line);

        wait(&status);      // Wait the child process to end its job

    }

  return 0;

}

share|improve this answer
    
What are these upvotes for? I haven't seen, where the OP confused parent and child. There's no kill in the source and it's entirely ok to exit the child. BTW, return 0 doesn't do anything else. –  Olaf Dietsche Nov 2 '12 at 21:22
    
he said > else if(pid > 0) { close(fd[0]); write(fd[1], "hello world\n", 12); exit(1); I thought he wants to be in the child process and the way he compares pid, it means he is in the parrent process. Secondly, what do you think exit(1) means? IT MEANS EXIT WITH ERROR CODE and the child process will be killed ;) –  Bogdan-Stefan Mirea Nov 2 '12 at 21:55
    
i am not confused between the child and the parent process, i just wanted both the process to end after doing their job, i.e. parent to write in the pipe, and the child to read from it and display –  haris Nov 3 '12 at 1:36

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