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For example, there are two columns - ID1 and ID2 which are linked to each other. It is possible that the IDs are linked with other IDs in the table.

ID1         ID2
------------------
001         002
001         003
004         005
002         006
005         007

In the above table, 001, 002, 003, 006 are linked and 004, 005, 007 are linked.

Is it possible to query this information in SQL for DB2?

The format is similar as the following:

Group       ID
--------------
1           001
1           002
1           003
1           006
2           004
2           005
2           007

On the other hand, if one more record (008, 007) is added to the table

ID1         ID2
------------------
001         002
001         003
004         005
002         006
005         007
008         007  (Newly added)

The expected result will be:

Group       ID
--------------
1           001
1           002
1           003
1           006
2           004
2           005
2           007
2           008

because 004, 005, 007, 008 are linked.

The DB2 Version is 9.7.

share|improve this question
    
You've made it a lot harder (would be easier with a single root). You want some sort of network graph (some other DBMSs support this better). I'm assuming you're on LUW? Oh, and can you have loops in the links? –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 4 '12 at 6:40
    
Yes. It is on LUW and there will be no loops (i.e. 001-002 and 002-001 in the table as the same time). –  red23jordan Nov 4 '12 at 14:34
    
Can you check my edits of expected input/output for sample data? And I'm still thinking, but this one is harder... –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 5 '12 at 23:56
    
Yes. I have check the edit and this is what I expect. Thanks. Please feel free to leave the message here when you have any idea. : ) –  red23jordan Nov 8 '12 at 3:03

1 Answer 1

Sure you can! It requires a recursive query:

WITH Recur (grp, root, leaf) as (SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY root.id1), 
                                        CAST(NULL as CHAR(3)), 
                                        root.id1
                                 FROM Linked as root
                                 EXCEPTION JOIN Linked as leaf
                                 ON leaf.id2 = root.id1
                                 GROUP BY root.id1
                                 UNION ALL 
                                 SELECT grp, leaf, id2
                                 FROM Recur 
                                 JOIN Linked
                                 ON id1 = leaf)

SELECT grp, leaf 
FROM Recur
ORDER BY grp, leaf

(Tested on my local iSeries, and have a working SQL Fiddle example, which has to use the LEFT JOIN-style exception to work in SQL Server)

Yields the expected output:

grp   leaf
=============
1     001 
1     002 
1     003 
1     006 
2     004 
2     005 
2     007 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the idea but I got the following error: SQL0345N The fullselect of the recursive common table expression "Recur" must be the UNION of two or more fullselects and cannot include column functions, GROUP BY clause, HAVING clause, ORDER BY clause, or an explicit join including an ON clause. –  red23jordan Nov 3 '12 at 4:14
    
I have modified the SQL from "SELECT grp, leaf, id2 FROM Recur JOIN Linked ON id1 = leaf) to "SELECT grp, leaf, id2 FROM Recur, Linked where id1 = leaf) and I could execute the SQL now. –  red23jordan Nov 3 '12 at 4:53
    
This SQL works fine for the above example. But when I add one more record - "001, 007" to the table. It is expected that 001, 002, 003, 004, 005, 006, 007 are linked but there are still 2 groups. Please see the link in details. sqlfiddle.com/#!3/faf98/1 –  red23jordan Nov 3 '12 at 4:57
    
Please update your question to include your version of DB2, that works on my (V6R1) iSeries just fine. Also include the desired results with the new example (I was assuming you only had uni-directional relationships). –  Clockwork-Muse Nov 3 '12 at 6:13
    
I have updated the question and thanks a lot for your help. –  red23jordan Nov 3 '12 at 11:51

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