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I'm trying to figure out how to map the relationship between two tables through a join table that has some meta data in it. In short, the three tables represent the page of a form, and each page can contain any number of elements (questions.) For some reason, the original developer decided that elements could be used on multiple forms. This means that the weight column, used to order the elements on the page, is in the join table.

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How the heck do I map this in XML? (Annotations aren't an option.)

For the join table, I guess it's like this:

<class name="com.foo.bar.model.db.ApplicationPageElements"  
       table="APPLICATION_PAGE_ELEMENTS">
    <composite-id name="id" class="com.foo.bar.model.db.ApplicationPageElementsKey">
        <key-property name="pageId" column="page_id"/>
        <key-property name="elementId" column="element_id"/>
    </composite-id>
    <property name="weight" type="java.lang.Long">
        <column name="WEIGHT" precision="0" />
    </property>
</class>

My instincts have me wanting to do something like this from the ApplicationPage side of things:

<set name="applicationElements" table="applicationPageElement">
    <key column="page_id"/>
    <many-to-many column="element_id" unique="true"
          class="com.foo.bar.model.db.ApplicationElements" />        
</set>

And that's where I get all slack-jawed, stare at the screen, and sob.

We're using .hbm.xml files to map our database. We also made the decision to not change our database.

Any ideas on how to map this in XML?

share|improve this question
    
I hate XML mapping, so I can't answer the question. But what I can tell is that you don't have any many-to-many here. You have a OneToMany between Page and ApplicationPageElement, and another OneToMany between Element and ApplicationPageElement. DOn't use the plural form to name an entity. Each instance of an entity represent one entity, not several ones. – JB Nizet Nov 2 '12 at 22:05
    
Some of the stuff you're seeing is legacy app stuff. I die a little inside every time I write ApplicationElements. – Marvo Nov 2 '12 at 23:00

Instead of thinking of the relationship between application_page and application_element as many to many, think of it as a one to many relationship from application_page to ApplicationPageElements and a one to many relationship from application_element to ApplicationPageElements.

In your application_page xml mapping add this:

<set name="applicationElements" inverse="true">
    <key column="page_id"/>
    <one-to-many class="ApplicationPageElements"/>
</set>

page_id forms a part of the primary key of the join table. So, mark the collection as inverse.

Your mapping for the join table is correct. But, with the above change current mapping of your join table you can navigate from application_page to ApplicationPageElements. To navigate from application_page to application_element (via ApplicationPageElements) add a many to one relationship in join table mapping.

<class name="com.foo.bar.model.db.ApplicationPageElements"  
       table="APPLICATION_PAGE_ELEMENTS">
    <composite-id name="id" class="com.foo.bar.model.db.ApplicationPageElementsKey">
        <key-property name="pageId" column="page_id"/>
        <key-property name="elementId" column="element_id"/>
    </composite-id>
    <property name="weight" type="java.lang.Long">
        <column name="WEIGHT" precision="0" />
    </property>
    <many-to-one name="elements" class="ApplicationElements" 
    column="element_id" not-null="true" insert="false" update="false"/>
    <many-to-one name="page" class="ApplicationPage" 
    column="page_id" not-null="true" insert="false" update="false"/>
</class>

Note that in the above many-to-one mapping, insert and update attributes are set to false. This is necessary because the columns are mapped twice, once in the composite key (which is responsible for insertion of the values) and again for the many-to-one associations.

The above use case is mentioned in detail in the book: Java Persistence with Hibernate.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your answer and detailed explanation. Question: In the first block of XML, did you mean to write name="applicationPageElements"? It sounds like you're saying I should pull back a list of the join table entries, and then get the list of elements from that. (And in that way, I'll be able to manipulate the "weight" column.) Right? No? – Marvo Nov 5 '12 at 23:34
    
Yes. I meant name="applicationPageElements". I just retained the name from your xml because name can be anything. Yes, from applicationPage you should pull a list of join table entries. For each join entry in the list you will get one applicationElement. Sorry for the late reply. I didn't get any notification about your comment. – Sathish Kumar Nov 9 '12 at 14:20
    
I initially used "applicationElement" because I want to retrieve a collection of ApplicationElement objects. I'm not really that interested in the join table. In other use cases where I don't have a "weight" (or other meta data) column on the join table, the mechanics of the join table are "hidden" by Hibernate from the programmer. I was hoping such a solution existed for this use case. But you're saying it doesn't, I guess. – Marvo Nov 9 '12 at 18:48

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