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Given a data.frame, I would like to test if all the columns are of the same "class". if they are I'd like to leave the data.frame as is. If they aren't I'd like to keep all columns that match the first variables class and drop any that are not of that class. The exception being that, for my purposes, integer and numeric are equal.

For example:

dat <- data.frame(numeric,numeric,integer,factor) 

Would be:

data.frame(numeric,numeric,integer) 

Additionally

dat <- data.frame(character,character,integer)

Would be:

data.frame(character,character) 

And finally:

dat <- data.frame(numeric,numeric,numeric,factor)

Would be:

data.frame(numeric,numeric,numeric)
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1  
I also wish I had better tools for not distinguishing between integer and numeric. For a while I thought mode would help, but I don't think that's reliable. –  joran Nov 2 '12 at 20:31
1  
Perhaps I'm missing something, but why not simply use dat[,sapply(dat, is.numeric)]? Because is.numeric(1L) is TRUE. –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 2 '12 at 20:34
    
I'll update my question with some more of my edge case scenarios so you can see why not. –  Brandon Bertelsen Nov 2 '12 at 20:35
    
I'm trying to capture two situations different situations. Not distinguising between two different types of numeric columns would be useful. –  Brandon Bertelsen Nov 2 '12 at 20:37
1  
@BrandonBertelsen -1 this is a very confusing question. Instead of pseudo examples and a simple real-case example, it would be better to give us an actual reproducible for both cases your show in the first code block. I'll happily remove the -1 if you can edit and provide more examples and output. See the Answers from Andrie and I for one ambiguity that would not be there if you'd shown real examples and real expected output. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 2 '12 at 21:12

3 Answers 3

I would do this:

dat <- data.frame(
  a=as.integer(1:26), b=as.integer(26:1), c=as.numeric(1:26), d=as.factor(1:26)
)

Create two helper functions:

is.numint <- function(x)is.numeric(x) || is.integer(x)
is.charfact <- function(x)is.character(x) || is.factor(x)

Return only numeric columns:

head(dat[, sapply(dat, is.numint)])
    a  b  c
1   1 26  1
2   2 25  2
3   3 24  3
4   4 23  4
5   5 22  5

Return only factor columns:

head(dat[, sapply(dat, is.charfact), drop=FALSE])
  d
1 1
2 2
3 3
4 4
5 5
6 6

Combining this approach, and rewriting your function:

dropext <- function(x){
  is.numint <- function(x)is.numeric(x) || is.integer(x)
  is.charfact <- function(x)is.character(x) || is.factor(x)
  cl <- rep(NA, length(x))
  cl[sapply(x, is.numint)] <- "num"
  cl[sapply(x, is.charfact)] <- "char"
  x[, cl == unique(cl)[1], drop=FALSE]
}

dropext(dat)
    a  b  c
1   1 26  1
2   2 25  2
3   3 24  3
4   4 23  4
5   5 22  5
share|improve this answer
    
That's basically what I said in my comment... is.numeric(1L) is TRUE so you don't need to test is.integer too. –  Joshua Ulrich Nov 2 '12 at 20:45
    
The issue is more complex than this though. The second example has a factor in the first column so he wants, if I understand correctly, to maintain the char/factor variables, but ignore numerics for the purposes of the entire if etc. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 2 '12 at 20:46
    
@GavinSimpson Answer edited. I think this does what the OP described. –  Andrie Nov 2 '12 at 20:53
    
@Andrie This gives a different result on dat2 from my Answer; it keeps both factors and characters. It isn't clear if the OP wants to keep both or just one. The code in the if() suggests he wants only one (he keeps the variables with class of the first component), but it is ambiguous what is wanted. –  Gavin Simpson Nov 2 '12 at 21:08
    
@GavinSimpson I agree that the question is somewhat ambiguous. I am basing my answer on a hunch / guess that the OP is describing survey data, and I respond based on my typical workflow when working with survey data. Either way, my approach can easily be modified, as you pointed out in your answer. –  Andrie Nov 2 '12 at 21:14

How about:

if(length(unique(cl <- sapply(dat, class))) > 1 && 
   any(!sapply(dat, is.numeric))) {
    dat <- dat[ , which(cl == cl[1]), drop = FALSE]
}

This assumes that in the following example:

dat2 <- data.frame(A = factor(sample(LETTERS, 26, replace = TRUE)),
                   B = factor(sample(LETTERS, 26, replace = TRUE)),
                   C = sample(LETTERS, 26, replace = TRUE),
                   dat, stringsAsFactors = FALSE)


> sapply(dat2, class)
               A                B                C 
        "factor"         "factor"      "character" 
as.integer.1.26. as.integer.26.1. as.numeric.1.26. 
       "integer"        "integer"        "numeric" 

you want only the factor variables, i.e. you want to distinguish between character and factor variables - which is what your code appears to do.

For this example I used

if(length(unique(cl <- sapply(dat2, class))) > 1 &&
   any(!sapply(dat2, is.numeric))) {
    dat2 <- dat2[ ,which(cl == cl[1]), drop = FALSE]
}

which results in

> head(dat2)
  A B
1 D G
2 P D
3 C T
4 X F
5 N R
6 A E
> sapply(dat2, class)
       A        B 
"factor" "factor"

On dat, the above if() statement would not change dat:

>     if(length(unique(cl <- sapply(dat, class))) > 1 && 
+         any(!sapply(dat, is.numeric))) {
+         dat <- dat[ , which(cl == cl[1]), drop = FALSE]
+     }
> head(dat)
  as.integer.1.26. as.integer.26.1. as.numeric.1.26.
1                1               26                1
2                2               25                2
3                3               24                3
4                4               23                4
5                5               22                5
6                6               21                6
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 As you say, we can only guess at the real question. –  Andrie Nov 2 '12 at 21:22
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Appreciate the commentary and your answers, in the end all I needed was a class() function that does not distinguish between integer and numeric. Which can be accomplished with a simple wrapper.

class.wrap <- function(x) {
test <- class(x) 
if(test == "integer") test <- "numeric"
return(test)
} 
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