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So I have a dataframe with four columns: Course ID, User ID, Day (an integer), and Cumulative Points Received. What I want to do is, for each user-course pair, use lowess to smooth the cumulative points over all of the days of the course. The lowess function takes a vector, applies a smoothing algorithm, and then returns two vectors x and y... I'm only interested in the y vector.

My first idea was

aggregate(df$CumulativePointsReceived, 
          list(df$UserID, df$CourseID),
          function(x) lowess(x)$y)

But that returns a basically unusable dataframe where the third column is a list of those vectors. What I want is a dataframe exactly like the input df, but with a column of the smoothed point values for each user-course-day. I'm sure there's a non-for-loop way to do this, but I can't seem to think about it the right way. Thanks in advance...

Here's the dput of the first user-course pair in the original df. I would have put more, but it gets stupidly large with 110 days for each user-course.

structure(list(CourseID = c(6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L, 6567146L,
6567146L), UserID = c(4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L, 4759679L,
4759679L), DayInCourse = 1:110, CumulativePointsReceived = c(0,
0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 47, 47, 47, 47, 47, 47, 47, 47,
47, 47, 47, 47, 47, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107,
107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107,
107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107,
107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107,
107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107,
107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107,
107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107, 107)), .Names =     c("CourseID",
"UserID", "DayInCourse", "CumulativePointsReceived"), row.names =     c(46085L,
46118L, 46120L, 46133L, 46102L, 46086L, 46182L, 46184L, 46159L,
46139L, 46088L, 46090L, 46144L, 46161L, 46187L, 46113L, 46177L,
46193L, 46151L, 46143L, 46126L, 46121L, 46104L, 46170L, 46128L,
46131L, 46167L, 46098L, 46127L, 46178L, 46101L, 46129L, 46152L,
46175L, 46093L, 46122L, 46096L, 46136L, 46106L, 46116L, 46148L,
46173L, 46189L, 46117L, 46172L, 46162L, 46164L, 46108L, 46091L,
46112L, 46135L, 46181L, 46190L, 46171L, 46169L, 46100L, 46141L,
46103L, 46168L, 46110L, 46107L, 46089L, 46154L, 46165L, 46125L,
46163L, 46147L, 46166L, 46183L, 46160L, 46150L, 46097L, 46115L,
46157L, 46194L, 46138L, 46188L, 46153L, 46155L, 46179L, 46180L,
46191L, 46095L, 46176L, 46111L, 46105L, 46142L, 46087L, 46109L,
46158L, 46145L, 46114L, 46192L, 46140L, 46146L, 46174L, 46094L,
46124L, 46149L, 46119L, 46186L, 46130L, 46134L, 46156L, 46185L,
46099L, 46123L, 46137L, 46132L, 46092L), class = "data.frame")
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can do this with base R functions. E.g.

lapply(split(df, list(df$UserID, df$CourseID)),
       function(x) with(x, lowess(DayInCourse, CumulativePointsReceived))$y)

which returns:

$`4759679.6567146`
  [1]  40.92152  42.50447  44.08898  45.67481  47.26167  48.84919
  [7]  50.43697  52.02450  53.61120  55.19639  56.77928  58.35896
 [13]  59.93435  61.50424  63.06724  64.62175  66.16596  67.69780
 [19]  69.21547  70.71909  72.20948  73.68773  75.15522  76.61367
 [25]  78.06516  79.51217  80.95767  82.40508  83.85843  85.32230
 [31]  86.80193  88.30315  89.83235  91.39619  93.00115  94.65248
 [37]  96.35240  98.75650 100.73124 102.31467 103.55841 104.51780
 [43] 105.24556 105.78855 106.18658 106.47246 106.67275 106.80862
 [49] 106.89685 106.95067 106.98051 106.99458 106.99936 107.00000
 [55] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
 [61] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
 [67] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
 [73] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
 [79] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
 [85] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
 [91] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
 [97] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
[103] 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000 107.00000
[109] 107.00000 107.00000

We can modify this approach to include the transformation step:

out <- lapply(split(df, list(df$UserID, df$CourseID)),
              function(x) transform(x, smooth = lowess(DayInCourse,         
                                    CumulativePointsReceived)$y))

> head(out[[1]])
      CourseID  UserID DayInCourse CumulativePointsReceived   smooth
46085  6567146 4759679           1                        0 40.92152
46118  6567146 4759679           2                        0 42.50447
46120  6567146 4759679           3                        0 44.08898
46133  6567146 4759679           4                        0 45.67481
46102  6567146 4759679           5                        0 47.26167
46086  6567146 4759679           6                        0 48.84919

As you only supplied one course/user combo, the result is a list with just one component. In a real world example, the list would have more components. In such circumstances do

final <- do.call(rbind, out)

The reason the aggregate() step failed is that you are passing lowess() a data frame and it expects two vectors x and y. I don't think this is the right approach here. Doing the split-apply-combine by hand would be the way to go unless you want to learn plyr.

share|improve this answer
    
I had to add drop = T to the split call, because not every user takes every course and lowess can't handle an empty x, but this worked for me! Thanks a lot. –  Andrew Sannier Nov 6 '12 at 21:10

I think this would be easier with plyr:

df <- ddply(df, .(CourseID, UserID), transform,
        smoothed = lowess(DayInCourse, CumulativePointsReceived)$y)

The general philosophy of plyr is "split-apply-combine". The syntax for the ddply function (which takes a data frame and returns a data frame--there are other functions for arrays or lists) is

ddply(dataframe, field-list, function, function-args)

The function then splits the dataframe into blocks of rows in which all of the values of the fields specified in the field-list are the same. It then takes each of these blocks and applies function along with any additional function-args the results of these function calls are then combined into a single data frame.

Here is an example:

ddply(mtcars, "cyl", colMeans)

In this case, colMeans is a function which takes the mean of each column in a data-frame, so the means are taken separately for each value of cyl.

You can also specify you own function:

ddply(mtcars, "cyl", function(df) c(hp.mean=mean(df$hp), hp.sd=sd(df$hp)))

Now to explain transform. transform is a handy function for adding new columns to a data frame without ugly indexing. Compare the following two identical calls:

Orange$score <- Orange$age * Orange$circumference^2

Orange <- transform(Orange, score = age * circumference^2)

The second version is easier to read and less error-prone. As you can see from this example, the syntax for transform is

tranform(dataframe, myname2 = some-value, myname2 = some-other-value)

and so on.

transform really comes into its own when used as the function call in plyr. In the example I gave above, smoothed = lowess(DayInCourse, CumulativePointsReceived)$y) is simply an additional argument passed to transform, so for each block x in the split data frame, ddply applys transform as

transform(x, smoothed = lowess(DayInCourse, CumulativePointsReceived)$y))

and then combines the results.

share|improve this answer
    
It's about time for me to learn plyr, I think. Thanks a lot for the solution! I'm still making sure that it's correct, but it looks good so far... –  Andrew Sannier Nov 2 '12 at 21:23
1  
@seancormody If you've got a second, would you mind explaining the "transform" argument? I guess that's being passed as .fun, but I don't really see how the smoothed = lowess() part goes into the ... meaningfully... –  Andrew Sannier Nov 2 '12 at 21:30
1  
I've added a bit more explanation. Hope it makes some sense. –  seancarmody Nov 3 '12 at 1:25
    
more than some - that's great! Thanks so much. –  Andrew Sannier Nov 5 '12 at 16:46
    
This actually ended up failing for me, because I cannot pass an input variable "smoothing" as a parameter to lowess() inside of the ddply() call. I tried some call() and do.call() solutions, but nothing worked. –  Andrew Sannier Nov 6 '12 at 20:03

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