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I'm working on a site, http://teneo.telegraphbranding.com/, and I am hoping to load the pages via ajax so that the sidebar and its animation remain consistent.

When the 'About' link is clicked I need it to load about2.php via a jquery ajax function. But I'm not having any luck. When I can get the page to load via ajax it kills all the jquery functionality on the page. From what I've read I think I need to call the jquery upon successful completion of the ajax call.

I've tried everything it seems and can't get it work. What I need is about2.php to load when the link is clicked and the jquery to dynamically size the divs, like it does on the homepage. I tried this, but it won't even load the page:

//Dropdown
$(document).ready(function () {
var dropDown = $('.dropdown');
$('h3.about').on('click', function() {
    dropDown.slideDown('fast', function() {
        var url = 'about2.php'

        $.get(url, function(data) {

        //anything in this block runs after the ajax call

            var missionWrap = $('#mission-wrap');
            var w = $(window);
            w.on('load resize',function() {
                missionWrap.css({ width:w.width(), height:w.height()});
            });
            var missionContent = $('#mission-content');
            var w = $(window);
            w.on('load resize',function() {
                missionContent.css({ width:w.width() - 205 });
            });
        });
    });
});

});

And then this loads the page, but kills all the jQuery associated with it:

var dropDown = $('.dropdown');
$('h3.about').on('click', function() {
    dropDown.slideDown('fast', function() {
        $('#index-wrap').load('/about2.php');
    });
});

Thank you very much.

I also tried this and it just broke everything:

$(document).ready(function () {
var dropDown = $('.dropdown');
$('h3.about').on('click', function () {
    dropDown.slideDown('fast', function () {
        $.ajax({
            type: 'GET',
            url: 'about2.php',
            success: function () {
                var missionWrap = $('#mission-wrap');
                var w = $(window);
                w.on('load resize', function () {
                    missionWrap.css({
                        width: w.width(),
                        height: w.height()
                    });
                });
                var missionContent = $('#mission-content');
                var w = $(window);
                w.on('load resize', function () {
                    missionContent.css({
                        width: w.width() - 205
                    });
                });
            };
        });
    });
});

});

share|improve this question
    
Doing a single-page-app correctly in a way that's usable is a lot of work. Are you sure an animated sidebar is worth the bother? –  millimoose Nov 2 '12 at 21:10
    
It is. I've done single page sites before, so I'm familiar with it - chiaroscurofnd.org. It's just the ajax that's throwing me off. –  reknirt Nov 2 '12 at 21:15
    
Are the mystery-meat-link paintings on that page supposed to flicker around in an epileptically-inducing fashion until the subpage is done loading? That site's subpages also aren't bookmarkable. –  millimoose Nov 2 '12 at 21:18
2  
Consider rewording your title, as it is completely devoid of any meaning as it is. –  lanzz Nov 2 '12 at 21:19
    
@lanzz Sorry about that, I corrected it. –  reknirt Nov 2 '12 at 21:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should work.

function resize_me () {
    var w = $(window);
    var missionWrap = $('#mission-wrap');
    var missionContent = $('#mission-content');
    missionWrap.css({ width:w.width(), height:w.height()});
    missionContent.css({ width:w.width() - 205 });
}

//Dropdown
$(document).ready(function () {
    $(window).on('load resize', function () {
        resize_me();
    });
    var dropDown = $('.dropdown');
    $('h3.about').on('click', function() {
        dropDown.slideDown('fast', function() {
            var url = 'about2.php'

            $.get(url, function(data) {
                resize_me();
            });
        });
    });
}

I believe that the problem was that the load event that you were attaching to the window object was not being triggered by the successful load of the $.get.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much @manishie! It works wonderfully. I very much appreciate the time you took to do that. I hope I can help you with something in the future. –  reknirt Nov 2 '12 at 22:21
    
no problem. :-) –  manishie Nov 2 '12 at 22:27
    
Won't $(window).on('load resize', function () { resize_me(); }); call the methods resize_me() twice, first time the page loads? –  Morten Gustafsson Nov 8 '13 at 22:37
    
AFAIK, it will not call it twice (though this may depend on the browser). I just did a quick test displaying an alert attached to both the load and resize events, and it only displayed once on window load. –  manishie Nov 9 '13 at 4:44
    
Your are absolutely right. On mac in both Safari and Firefox it is called twice. But on Pc it is only called once. –  Morten Gustafsson Nov 9 '13 at 8:12

This is a rough outline of how to structure your application to handle this correctly.

Assuming your HTML looks something like this:

<html>
...
<div id="index-wrap">
    <!-- this is the reloadable part -->
    ...
</div>
...
</html>

You need to refactor all the jQuery enhancements to the elements inside #index-wrap to be in a function you can call after a reload:

function enhance(root) {
    $('#some-button-or-whatever', root).on('click', ...);
}

(I.e. look up all the elements under the root element that was loaded using AJAX.)

You need to call this function when the page is first loaded, as well as after the AJAX call in the completion callback:

$('#index-wrap').load('/foo.php', function() {
    enhance(this);
});

You can also potentially get rid of some of this using delegated ("live") events, but it's best to hit the jQuery documentation on how those work.

As for events bound to window or DOM elements which aren't loaded dynamically, you shouldn't need to rebind them at all based on which subpage is loaded, just check which of your elements loaded is in a handler that you set up once:

$(window).on('load resize', function() {
    var $missionContent = $('#missionContent');
    if ($missionContent.length) {
        $missionContent.css(...);
    }
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much. This clears a lot of things up for me. Also, I appreciate the feedback on the chiarascuro site. Can you point me to any information on getting the back button to trigger a smooth scroll? –  reknirt Nov 2 '12 at 22:23
    
@jtrinker You'll need to use the pushState() API to make the browser recognize "fake" navigation. When calling this method, you can associate an arbitrary object describing the state you're navigating to. You then listen to window.onpopstate; in the handler for that event, you trigger the corresponding transition to get to the state the event describes. –  millimoose Nov 2 '12 at 23:05

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