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I'm working on an application that will store "commands" in a database using NHibernate. Each command will have a set of arguments with it. For instance, the "sleep" command has a duration, and "set text" has a string value. All of these commands derive from the same Command base type.

I'd like to allow additional commands to be added in the future with the smallest possible impact to the database. My initial reaction is to use the table-per-hierarchy pattern since the only schema modification required would be to add a column to the Command table.

I also considered using the TPH pattern but mapping generic columns instead of specific ones, and then convert them to the specific (strongly-typed) property values in the classes themselves (i.e. shadow the mapped, generic string properties with strongly-typed public properties). That way I wouldn't have to change the table at all if I had a number of columns equal to the most arguments any command could need. These seemed a little hacky in my mind though...

As a relative new-comer to database design and NHibernate usage, can someone point holes in these approaches, or suggest something better? I'm trying to avoid changing the schema (as much as possible) while allowing for future extension and a simple C# API.

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1  
I've taken the liberty of adding "class-table-inheritance" to the tags for your question. Following this tag will let you see how people have used the same design pattern when building tables in SQL. Some of the sameissues surface in that context. –  Walter Mitty Nov 3 '12 at 13:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Look into a BaseImmutableUserType<T> : IUserType implementation, this would allow you to use the generic column.

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I see some examples of the interface, but I'm not sure how to apply it here. Can you elaborate a little? –  Patrick Quirk Nov 4 '12 at 17:12
    
I think I see where you're going. Are you suggesting I map generic columns (Arg1, Arg2, Arg3), but use IUserType definitions to map Arg1 to an int for one command and then Arg1 to a TimeSpan (for example) for another command? –  Patrick Quirk Nov 5 '12 at 14:53

IMO, your best bet is to use a table containing a single XML type column instead of baking in an inheritance hierarchy that may or may not model the actual domain problem. XML columns are well-known to be a frictionless way to evolve a data model, especially one which you anticipate may change significantly over time.

The XML column can store the entire object graph needed to represent your command object(s) as serialized by the .NET BCL classes or using your own custom XML serializer (see IXmlSerializable).

NHibernate natively supports the XML SQL Server column type. Googling should bring back several examples of how to do the mapping etc.

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I hadn't considered using Xml, but now that you mention it that's not an awful idea. The only part I don't like is the additional step of converting Xml to C# data types on top of the NHibernate conversion. –  Patrick Quirk Nov 4 '12 at 17:08

I ended up taking the answer from @mxmissile, and here are the details of the interesting parts of the implementation, hopefully helping someone else. Ended up being pretty clean overall, all of the logic is handled in the mappings.

/// <summary>NHibernate class mapping file for <see cref="Action"/>.</summary>
internal sealed class ActionMapper : ClassMap<Action>
{
    /// <summary>Constructor.</summary>
    public ActionMapper()
    {
        DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn("ClassType").Not.Nullable();

        Id(x => x.Id);
    }
}

/// <summary>NHibernate class mapping file for <see cref="SetText"/>.</summary>
internal sealed class SetTextMapper : SubclassMap<SetText>
{
    public SetTextMapper()
    {
        DiscriminatorValue(typeof(SetText).Name);

        Map(x => x.Text).Column("Arg1").CustomType<StringArgType>();
    }
}

/// <summary>NHibernate class mapping file for <see cref="Sleep"/>.</summary>
internal sealed class SleepMapper : SubclassMap<Sleep>
{
    public SleepMapper()
    {
        DiscriminatorValue(typeof(Sleep).Name);

        Map(x => x.Duration).Column("Arg1").CustomType<TimeSpanArgType>();
    }
}

internal class StringArgType : BaseImmutableUserType<String>
{
    public override SqlType[] SqlTypes
    {
        // All arguments map to strings in the database
        get { return new[] {new SqlType(DbType.String)}; }
    }

    public override object NullSafeGet(IDataReader Reader, string[] Names, object Owner)
    {
        return NHibernateUtil.String.NullSafeGet(Reader, Names[0]).As<String>();
    }

    public override void NullSafeSet(IDbCommand Command, object Value, int Index)
    {
        NHibernateUtil.String.NullSafeSet(Command, Value, Index);
    }
}

internal class TimeSpanArgType : BaseImmutableUserType<TimeSpan>
{
    public override SqlType[] SqlTypes
    {
        // All arguments map to strings in the database
        get { return new[] {new SqlType(DbType.String)}; }
    }

    public override object NullSafeGet(IDataReader Reader, string[] Names, object Owner)
    {
        return NHibernateUtil.TimeSpan.NullSafeGet(Reader, Names[0]).As<TimeSpan?>();
    }

    public override void NullSafeSet(IDbCommand Command, object Value, int Index)
    {
        object val = DBNull.Value;

        if (Value != null)
        {
            TimeSpan timespan = (TimeSpan)Value;
            val = timespan.Ticks;
        }

        NHibernateUtil.String.NullSafeSet(Command, val, Index);
    }
}
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