Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

Consider a schema R(A, B, C, D) and functional dependencies A ⟶ B and C ⟶ D. Then why isn't the decomposition of R into R1(A, B) and R2(C, D) a lossless decomposition? Can you please explain with real life example that what info is lost here?

share|improve this question
    
that looks like a GATE exam question –  vikkyhacks Jul 16 '14 at 18:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You certainly need the two relations R1(A,B) and R2(C, D) that you outline in the lossless decomposition, but you've lost the crucial information about which A values are associated with which C values that was present in the original R(A, B, C, D). So you also need R3(A, C) to keep all the original information.

Relation R

A    B    C    D
1    2    13   14
2    2    13   14
3    1    12   15

Relation R1

A    B
1    2
2    2
3    1

Relation R2

C    D
13   14
12   15

Join R1 and R2 (Cartesian product); bogus rows marked ☜

A    B    C    D
1    2    13   14
1    2    12   15   ☜
2    2    13   14
2    2    12   15   ☜
1    3    13   14   ☜
3    1    12   15

Since this join is not the same as R, the proposed decomposition is not lossless.

Relation R3

A   C
1   13
2   13
3   12

Join R1, R2, R3

A    B    C    D
1    2    13   14
2    2    13   14
3    1    12   15

Since this result relation is the same as the original R, the decomposition into R1, R2, and R3 is lossless.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much sir ..:) –  user1543957 Nov 2 '12 at 22:23

Then why isn't the decomposition of R into R1(A, B) and R2(C, D) a lossless decomposition?

Because now (A,B) and (C,D) are unrelated, which they weren't. You need also a relation between A and C.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the help –  user1543957 Nov 2 '12 at 22:25

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.