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In our CORE library we offer this class as a 20,000 line abstraction. Can you see anything wrong with the way this is designed?

Note1: This class has a SharpZipLib backing.

Note2: SharpZipLib is approximately 20K lines.

public static class Compression
{
    public static Byte[] CompressBytes(Byte[] input);
    public static Byte[] CompressBytes(Byte[] input, Format format);
    public static Byte[] CompressBytes(Byte[] input, Format format, Level level);

    public static Byte[] DecompressBytes(Byte[] input);
    public static Byte[] DecompressBytes(Byte[] input, Format format);

    public static String CompressString(String input);
    public static String CompressString(String input, Format format);
    public static String CompressString(String input, Format format, Level level);

    public static String DecompressString(String input);
    public static String DecompressString(String input, Format format);

    public static void CompressFile(String input_file_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void CompressFile(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format);
    public static void CompressFile(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format, Level level);

    public static void DecompressFile(String input_file_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void DecompressFile(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format);

    public static void CompressFolder(String input_folder_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void CompressFolder(String input_folder_path, String output_file_path, Format format);
    public static void CompressFolder(String input_folder_path, String output_file_path, Format format, Level level);

    public static void DecompressFolder(String input_file_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void DecompressFolder(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format);
}
share|improve this question
    
I think you should lose the 'subjective' tag. This is a good question, and I think there is an unhappy stigma associated with subjective questions. Plus, it's not really subjective - this is a question about refactoring, and those are serious questions. Either way, though, +1. –  unforgiven3 Aug 25 '09 at 3:34

8 Answers 8

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I would recommend breaking this single class into several classes. Generally speaking, static utility classes break a lot of rules, not the least of which is Separation of Concerns. While yes, all of the methods in this class deal with compression, they are concerned with compressing different things. Some compress byte arrays, some compress strings, some compress files. I would break this single utility into multiple utilities:

public static class ByteCompression
{
    public static Byte[] Compress(Byte[] input);
    public static Byte[] Compress(Byte[] input, Format format);
    public static Byte[] Compress(Byte[] input, Format format, Level level);

    public static Byte[] Decompress(Byte[] input);
    public static Byte[] Decompress(Byte[] input, Format format);
}

public static class StringCompression

    public static String Compress(String input);
    public static String Compress(String input, Format format);
    public static String Compress(String input, Format format, Level level);

    public static String Decompress(String input);
    public static String Decompress(String input, Format format);
}

public static class FileCompression
{
    public static void Compress(String input_file_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void Compress(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format);
    public static void Compress(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format, Level level);

    public static void Decompress(String input_file_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void Decompress(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format);
}

public static FolderCompression
{
    public static void Compress(String input_folder_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void Compress(String input_folder_path, String output_file_path, Format format);
    public static void Compress(String input_folder_path, String output_file_path, Format format, Level level);

    public static void Decompress(String input_file_path, String output_file_path);
    public static void Decompress(String input_file_path, String output_file_path, Format format);
}

The above utility classes reduce repetition, better encapsulate purpose, are more cohesive with their member methods, and are clearer in intent. You do have four static utility types rather than one, but you aren't breaking as many rules/best practices this way. Try to avoid monolithic, do-everything utility classes. If you can, find a way to make them instance classes rather than static classes, especially if there is any shared data at the class level that is used across each compress/decompress method. That will improve thread safety.

EDIT:

A more ideal implementation would use extension methods, as andy commented. The File and Folder compression are a bit more difficult to implement as extensions, but I've tried my hand. The following examples better achieve what I was aiming for: separation of noun (or subject) from verb (or operation), providing a cleaner API that ultimately has less repetition, maintains separation of concerns, and is properly encapsulated.

public static class ByteCompressionExtensions
{
    public static byte[] Compress(this byte[] input);
    public static byte[] Compress(this byte[] input, Format format);
    public static byte[] Compress(this byte[] input, Format format, Level level);

    public static byte[] Decompress(this byte[] input);
    public static byte[] Decompress(this byte[] input, Format format);
}

// In use:
byte[] myArray = new byte[] { ... };
byte[] compArray = myArray.Compress();
// Subject (noun) -----^      ^----- Operation (verb)


public static class StringCompressionExtensions
{
    public static byte[] Compress(this string input);
    public static byte[] Compress(this string input, Format format);
    public static byte[] Compress(this string input, Format format, Level level);

    // Extension method fail!! :( :( This conflicts with Decompress from the class above!
    public static string Decompress(this byte[] input);
    public static string Decompress(this byte[] input, Format format);
}

// In use:
string myStr = "A string!";
byte[] compArray = myStr.Compress();
// Subject (noun) ---^      ^----- Operation (verb)
myStr = compArray.Decompress(); // Fail! :(


public static class FileCompressionExtensions
{
    public static void Compress(this FileInfo input, FileInfo output);
    public static void Compress(this FileInfo input, FileInfo output, Format format);
    public static void Compress(this FileInfo input, FileInfo output, Format format, Level level);

    public static void Decompress(this FileInfo input, FileInfo output);
    public static void Decompress(this FileInfo input, FileInfo output, Format format);
}

// In use:
FileInfo myFile = new FileInfo(input_file_path);
FileInfo myCompFile = new FileInfo(output_file_path);
                 myFile.Compress(myCompFile);
// Subject (noun) --^      ^----- Operation (verb)
                 myCompFile.Decompress(myFile);


public static class FolderCompressionExtensions
{
    public static void Compress(this DirectoryInfo input, DirectoryInfo output);
    public static void Compress(this DirectoryInfo input, DirectoryInfo output, Format format);
    public static void Compress(this DirectoryInfo input, DirectoryInfo output, Format format, Level level);

    public static void Decompress(this DirectoryInfo input, DirectoryInfo output);
    public static void Decompress(this DirectoryInfo input, DirectoryInfo output, Format format);
}

// In use:
DirectoryInfo myDir = new DirectoryInfo(input_folder_path);
DirectoryInfo myCompDir = new DirectoryInfo(output_folder_path);
                 myDir.Compress(myCompDir);
// Subject (noun) --^      ^----- Operation (verb)
                 myCompDir.Decompress(myDir);
share|improve this answer
4  
if you're going to break it up by Types, I would drop the API altogether and just implement all the functionality via Extension methods, so SomeString.Compress(), SomeBytes.Compress() etc. –  andy Aug 24 '09 at 4:37
    
I would combine this answer with the one above. Definitely start by splitting off related functionality though - 20,000 lines in one file is way too much. –  Jamie Penney Aug 24 '09 at 4:37
    
Extension methods are an option if you are using the right version of C#. However, given the nature of the file and folder compression, that would break what would otherwise be a clean API, as there is no decent, logical way to implement those two as extension methods. –  jrista Aug 24 '09 at 4:39
    
An additional step you might take is to add the type of compression (if it is a well known one) to the names. For example: CompressZip and DecompressZip. –  Chris Dunaway Aug 24 '09 at 14:47
2  
@ChaosPandion: I think your still missunderstanding the point I was trying to make. Your classifying the concern as "compression". Thats a very broad concern, and you could lump a LOT of functionality into a single static class under that label. Try to look at it from a finer grain: Byte array compression, string compression, file and folder compression. A lot of architecture boils down to figuring out how to classify things. You can't be too broad in your classifications, but, as you noted, you can't be too fine grained either. Find the right balance, and you'll reap the benefits. –  jrista Aug 25 '09 at 3:16

An obvious improvement will be with VS2010 where you can have optional parameters.

Another thing that could be helpful is to offer extension methods, so that I could do: input_folder_path.CompressFolder(output_file_path).DecompressFolder(outputfile);

This would allow me to compress, and then decompress what was compressed in order to verify the compression.

What if I want to compress a folder and have it put in the same level as the input file path, why should I have to specify the output file?

So, if I do CompressFolder(@"C:\input_folder") and leave it like that then it would use C: as the output path.

share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of the API returning a path. When you compress a file or folder. –  ChaosPandion Aug 25 '09 at 0:49
    
Please explain why optional parameters would be 'an obvious improvement'. I don't feel that out-of-order arguments are really improving this API. Also, compressing c:\input_folder automagically to c:\input_folder.zip is, if anything, just another override method. –  Robert Paulson Aug 25 '09 at 3:25
    
If I call CompressString("some input string") then the format and level will have a default value, as I expect that everything leads to the Compress method with 3 parameters. If I have optional arguments then I can put those default values in the parameter list and reduce the number of functions to one, and yet have the advantage of overloading in that the programmer only as to pass in one parameter. The reason for assuming the output directory is just a simplification as the original request was what could make the API better. –  James Black Aug 25 '09 at 3:35
    
You can do that today without optional parameters. See my answer. –  Robert Paulson Aug 25 '09 at 3:55

Another improvident not in .net 4 could be to create a class CompressInfo that have String input_folder_path, String output_file_path, Format format, Level level properties in it, and to have just one method that will check is properties null or not.

share|improve this answer
    
I would take overloads over a single monolithic method that has to check for nulls any day. Overloads are clean and simple, and don't require that you create some type before hand to pass into the call. –  jrista Aug 24 '09 at 4:36
    
Why ? the method with the most parameters will still have to look for nulls in the other parameters ? –  sirrocco Aug 24 '09 at 15:02
    
yea, but he will provide only 2 methods to end user in API –  ArsenMkrt Aug 24 '09 at 15:06
    
just for the record I was responding to jrista :) –  sirrocco Aug 24 '09 at 18:22
    
I agree with jrista on this. I'll be sticking with overloads... Until C# 4 comes out of course. –  ChaosPandion Aug 25 '09 at 0:50

Firstly I'd recommend having a look at this excellent presentation by Casey Muratori : http://www.mollyrocket.com/873
(you have to follow the slides and the audio separately unfortunately)

If you plan on keeping a monolithic class, my personal preference would be:

public static Byte[] CompressGzip(Byte[] input);
public static Byte[] CompressGzip(Byte[] input, Level level);

public static Byte[] DecompressGzip(Byte[] input);

public static String CompressGzip(String input);
public static String CompressGzip(String input, Level level);

etc

ie. I know they're bytes, the compiler knows they're bytes, why do I have to type it in? However, keeping Gzip front and centre is important, as its a requirement that data compressed with Gzip is decompressed with the same. Of course, this doesn't work if you can encode Byte arrays to Strings or any combination thereof.

Ie. otherwise this code looks suspiciously non-suspicious:

Format f = Format.NotDefault;

// Use our non-standard compression
String compressed = Compress("my name", f);

// more code, or transfer across the network

// Uh oh! Decompression failed.
// The default parameters are broken in this case!
String decompressed = Decompress(compressed);

By putting the method in the name, you ensure that everybody thinks about what format the compressed bytes are in.

Further, you leave room to add extra compression options for different engines - eg LZMA's dictionary size parameter.

share|improve this answer

One refactoring improvement I might make is:

public sealed class CompressOptions
{
  public Format Format { get; set; }
  public Level Level { get; set; }
}

You can then reduce to 2 methods per compression target. Using the Byte[] compressors as an example.

public static Byte[] Compress(Byte[] input)
{
    Compress(input, new CompressOptions { Format=Zip, Level=Normal });
}
public static Byte[] Compress(Byte[] input, CompressOptions options)
{
    if( options == null )
        throw new ArgumentNullException("options");

    // compress-away
}

Caller code can then use whatever options they want without you having to provide overrides for every conceivable scenario, which just seem to be duplicated once per scenario (Byte, strings, files).

Byte[] b = GetSomeData();
var result = Compress(b, new CompressOptions { Format=Gzip } );
var result2 = Compress(b, new CompressOptions { Level=Store } );
var result3 = Compress(b);

You might want to make CompressOptions immutable as well (i.e. once set, a value can't be changed)

This design also allows the Compress Options to be passed into code that needs to compress something, without it needing to know what compression to use.

For other compressors that may require more options, you could subclasses from CompressOptions (unseal it first though, and seal any leaf classes). There are a number of variations here.

share|improve this answer
    
I'd also recommend this in conjunction with @jrista's answer –  Robert Paulson Aug 25 '09 at 3:57
    
I do like your answer, esp since you have an option for parts of the code to not need the details, so it could be injected in using DI, so the user can set these parameters. –  James Black Aug 26 '09 at 0:59

Following on from jrista, I would inherit them, because I can assume there is some common functionality:

abstract class CompressorBase<T> { }

And then consider having a standard methods of the form:

public CompressionResult Compress (T toCompress, CompressionParams paramaters)
{
}

Then, at least, the class itself is making clear decisions about what to do, simply based on changes to the 'CompressionParams' class.

It's quite nice because you don't need to go around changing the public API anymore, just make changes to that class and the 'Compressor' will figure the rest out.

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That makes CompressionParams a part of the API, and user would have to configure it properly for different types of T... Less functions, but this exposes too much to the outside IMO. –  MaxVT Aug 24 '09 at 5:29
    
Yes, but the caller is already passing in a lot of parameters, and it will greatly simplify your API. So your instatiation is something like ByteCompressor<byte[]> b = new ByteCompressor<byte[]>(); b.Compress(myBytes, params);. It's slightly redundant on the generics, but that's just due to the lack of support to that style of inheritance in c#. I personally think it's quite beautiful :) –  Noon Silk Aug 24 '09 at 5:37
    
Following an OO paradigm would overly complicate this. Our goal was to make it as simple as possible. –  ChaosPandion Aug 25 '09 at 0:52
    
I don't see it overly complicating it at all, but perhaps it comes down to preference. Does it go without saying that you would subclass CompressionParams to have the appropriate variables for each subclass? It just seems so nice, to have it all wrapped up and OO, in this fashion. Regardless though, up to you of course :) I'm close to writing up all the classes though, just to see how it looks. –  Noon Silk Aug 25 '09 at 0:54

For the compress methods consider returning information like compression achieved. Similarly for decompression a status indication if any file/folder did not decompress for some reason.

In case of compression/decompression there are usually valid cases when the method should not succeed. For example trying to compress a file that is in use or decompress location can potentially overwrite something. Because these are not 'exceptions' you should not throw exceptions in such cases and returning the information either as a return value or 'out' parameter is recommended.

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I disagree. These are exceptions that the caller should handle. –  ChaosPandion Aug 25 '09 at 0:53
    
Trying to compress a file that is in use is exactly the type of exceptional circumstance that exception handling is for. –  kibibu Aug 25 '09 at 3:15

In our CORE library we offer this class as a 20,000 line abstraction....

20k lines? Seriously? It's not the API surface that's your problem then. I mean surely, CompressString(string) is just calling into CompressString(string, Format, Level) - right? And surely CompressString(string, Format, Level) basically consists of:

byte[] b = System.Text.Encoding.Default.GetBytes(input);
byte[] c = CompressBytes(b, format, level);
return Convert.ToBase64(c);

which is all of 3 lines - with the temp variables. I can think of similar implementations of the rest.

So - that leads me to believe that CompressBytes(byte[], Format, Level) must be around 19,500 lines. I'd say that's your problem.

share|improve this answer
    
How does this answer my question? Also I updated my question to mention we use a SharpZipLib backing which is in fact about 20k lines. –  ChaosPandion Aug 26 '09 at 0:53

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