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I was wondering if I could calculate the logarithm of a number based on a number relative to a base (for example, log base 2 of 16) without actually using log(). I managed to do it, but I don't believe it is very efficient.

This is my code in Python:

def myLog(x,b):
    exp=0
    ans=b**exp
    while x!=ans:
        ans=b**exp
        if ans==x:
            return exp
        exp=exp+1

So I could give it myLog(16,2) and it should return 4. And indeed it does, however I believe it is not the most efficient way, so how could I fix it and make my code more efficient, not just in this case, but in most of them?

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8  
This is an almost perfect fit for codereview.SE ;] –  inspectorG4dget Nov 3 '12 at 1:26

7 Answers 7

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here's my two cents worth:

def myLog(x,b):
    exp = 0
    ans = 1
    while ans<x:
        ans *= b
        exp += 1
    if ans == x:
        return exp  
    else:
        raise ValueError("can't find a suitable exponent")

In [10]: myLog(16,2)
Out[10]: 4

Hope this helps

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hmn... i tested it however it does not seem to work for some reason –  user1795758 Nov 3 '12 at 2:01
    
@Epsilon: Updated. Works! –  inspectorG4dget Nov 3 '12 at 2:58

Try recursion:

In [21]: def func(a,b,ans=0):
    if a/b==1:
        return ans+1
    else: return func(a/b,b,ans+1)
   ....:
   ....:

In [26]: func(16,2)
Out[26]: 4

In [27]: func(8,2)
Out[27]: 3

In [28]: func(16,4)
Out[28]: 2
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max(None,0) is cleaner than the ternary here –  inspectorG4dget Nov 3 '12 at 1:31
    
Or how about ans = ans or 0. –  Blckknght Nov 3 '12 at 1:47
    
@inspectorG4dget good point, solution edited. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Nov 3 '12 at 1:59
2  
@AshwiniChaudhary: Actually, now that I think of it, there's no reason to use a None default at all. Just make the default value 0 and don't mess with it later. –  Blckknght Nov 3 '12 at 2:00
    
can't if a/b==1: simplify to if a==b:? –  Samy Bencherif Jan 30 at 23:23

You're not taking into account if someone gives a negative value such as myLog(-1,2) or if it is 1 myLog(1,2), then you compute ans before the loop which you know it always be 0 because you put exp = 0, then in the loop you compute it again without before changing the exp.

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Assumes:

x: a positive integer
b: a positive integer; b >= 2
returns: log_b(x), or, the logarithm of x relative to a base b.

Seems the shortest way is:

def myLog(x, b):
    ans = 0
    while b <= x:
        ans += 1
        x /= b
    return ans

Or recursively:

def myLog(x, b):
    if (b > x): return 0
    else: return 1 + myLog(x/b, b)
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Because it is an endless loop:

def myLog(x,b):
    exp = 0
    ans = b**exp
    while x != ans:
        ans = b**exp
        if ans>x:
            return -1
        if ans == x:
            return exp
        exp = exp+1

See also:

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This version adds support for non-integer outputs:

def log(a, b):
    b = float(b)
    a = float(a)
    g = a
    n = 0
    i = 1
    while b**i != 1:
        while g >= b**i:
            g /= b**i
            n += i
        i /= b
    return n
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Note: This is only accurate when a >= 1 and b > 0 –  Samy Bencherif Mar 1 at 18:20
    def log(a, b):
b = float(b)
a = float(a)
g = a
n = 0
i = 1
while b**i != 1:
    while g >= b**i:
        g /= b**i
        n += i
    i /= b
return n

Does not work for all numbers. log(5,10) returns 0.00000 when it should be 0.69897

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