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In the code I'm writing, I have been told to define a variable in a header file in the following way:

#define CLR_BLACK 0x0000

and since this is the only example I've been given, I was wondering whether all variables defined in a header file with the #define command need to be in caps. For example, would the following be valid?

#define videoBuffer (u16*)0x6000000

Thanks in advance for any help

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These are not variables. –  Lee Taylor Nov 3 '12 at 1:23
    
How about... try it? :) –  minitech Nov 3 '12 at 1:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No. You can use any combination of alphanumeric characters and underscores. Don't start with a number.

However a variable name like videoBuffer would be difficult to distinguish from regular variables (without syntax coloring). That's why most people either use all caps for preprocessor macros or start them with a lower case k, like this: kMyPreprocessorMacro

EDIT: Those are not "global variables" by the way (as you tagged). They're preprocessor macros. Basically an automatic find and replace mechanism that is run at compile time.

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so that videoBuffer example there would in fact be vaild? –  superdemongob Nov 3 '12 at 1:23
    
Yes it would be valid. However a variable name like that would be difficult to distinguish from regular variables (without syntax coloring). That's why most people either use all caps for preprocessor macros or start them with a lower case k like that: kMyPreprocessorMacro. –  DrummerB Nov 3 '12 at 1:25
    
right, thanks for that additional clarification on preprocessor macros. –  superdemongob Nov 3 '12 at 3:24

No.

#define is a pre-processor macro. It replaces every occurrence of the first string after it with whatever comes after the string. The first string does not need to be in caps.

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No, but it's a common and useful convention so if you're reading the code you can see what's a macro and what isn't. See c++ #ifndef for include files, why is all caps used for the header file?

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