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I am collecting data in a hash of hashes which looks like

$VAR1 = {
          '502' => {
                     'user2' => '0'
                   },
          '501' => {
                     'git' => '0',
                     'fffff' => '755'
                   },
          '19197' => {
                       'user4' => '755'
                     }
        };

The problem is in 501. Two keys may not occur. Is it possible to detect this?

Update Fixed typo in hash.

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migrated from serverfault.com Nov 3 '12 at 3:27

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Seems like you should be able to do something like foreach VAR1 as k,v (if count(v) { echo 'k is duplicatedup'}. I don't know the perl syntax for that though. –  Zoredache Nov 2 '12 at 16:43
    
Do you want to store a nested hash (git, fffff) as the value of key "501"? –  jscott Nov 2 '12 at 16:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

keys(%{$VAR1{'501'}}) == 2 where the rest would be one.

Also, syntax error on that key, but I assume it's a typo.

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You should still have keys so it is keys( %{$VAR1{'501'}}) == 2 –  Sandra Schlichting Nov 2 '12 at 17:10

If you are only going to store one key-value pair under each key of the main hash, why not use a 2-element array instead? That way you can check for existence before making each new insert, without needing to check the size of the hash or knowing what its keys are. The structure I'm proposing is this:

$VAR1 = {
    '502' => [ 'user2', '0' ],
    '501' => [ 'git', '0' ],
    '19197' => [ 'user4', '755' ]
}
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That is a very elegant design solution. I will do that next time! Thanks =) –  Sandra Schlichting Nov 2 '12 at 17:04

Assuming your hashref above is named $var :

my @bad = grep { scalar keys %{$var->{$_}} > 1 } keys %$var;

Results in an array of hash keys that have more than one hashref within them. Using your data above:

# perl test.pl
$VAR1 = {
          '501' => {
                     'git' => '0',
                     'fffff' => '755'
                   },
          '502' => {
                     'user2' => '0'
                   },
          '19197' => {
                       'user4' => '755'
                     }
        };
$VAR1 = '501';

Then you could access each element that is detected as bad with:

foreach my $key ( @bad ) {
  # do something to or with $var->{$key}
}
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