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Hi. I was wondering if there is a way to add items into a list recursively. The function is supposed to print the path names of the file that matches with fname. So fname is the name of the file and the path is the folder in which the file is located. If there are folders inside the path folder it will go inside and look for the fname file. so far I am able to find all the files. But I am not able to append the list recursively.

def findAll(fname, path): 
 lst= []
 for item in os.listdir(path):
        n = os.path.join(path, item)
    try:
        if item == fname:
            lst.append(n)
    except:
        findAll(fname,n)
return lst
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4  
I'd take a look at os.walk. –  Blender Nov 3 '12 at 4:22
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5 Answers

you need to extend your list with your recursive call

list.extend(findAll(fname,n))

also you can check if something is a directory with os.path.isdir(n)

but I think you have more problems than that with your script

afaik listdir just returns names , not the path of the directory ....

so you will need to call findAll(fname,os.path.join(path,n))

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Not related to the question per se but I believe that os.walk would help you out:

allFiles = []
for root, dirs, files in os.walk(basedir):
    [allFiles.append(file) for file in files]

Check out help(os.walk), it comes with a great example on how to use this function.

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try/except is used incorrectly in your code. except clause is executed only if there is an error. Also you don't use the returned value from findAll(). You could skip creating a list inside the function and just yield found items lazily instead:

import os

def findAll(filename, rootdir): 
    for item in os.listdir(rootdir):
        path = os.path.join(rootdir, item)
        if not os.path.isdir(path):
            if item == filename: # don't select dirs
                yield path
        else: # path is a dir
            try:
                for found_path in findAll(filename, path):
                    yield found_path
            except EnvironmentError:
                pass # ignore errors

print(list(findAll('python', '/usr')))

Output

['/usr/bin/python']

if it is not homework you could use os.walk() to find the files:

import os

def find_all(filename, rootdir):
    for dirpath, dirs, files in os.walk(rootdir):
        for file in files:
            if file == filename:
                yield os.path.join(dirpath, file)


print(list(find_all('python', '/usr')))

Output

['/usr/bin/python']

It is the same output as expected.

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If you're on a Unix based system you could use find with the subprocess module .. I would reckon this would be the fastest way to retrieve all paths matching a filename. You can then do a split() on the output to make it a list:

>>> import subprocess
>>> lst = subprocess.check_output('find . -name "*rst"', shell=True)
>>> print lst
    ./SphinxWorkspace/doc/chapter1.rst
    ./SphinxWorkspace/doc/index.rst
    ./SphinxWorkspace/doc/tables.rst

You can always split the command and avoid the shell=True

Checkout: http://docs.python.org/2/library/subprocess.html#using-the-subprocess-module .. Hope this helps!

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Normally, I wouldn't give a full solution because this smells like homework (which is also why I'm avoiding os.walk), but since you have posted your attempt, here's an explanation and a solution:

For one thing, every time you call findAll, you initialize lst. Sure, you return it at the end, but you don't do anything with the return value, so the effect lst.append is contained within the recursion and is therefore not visible outside. Let me try to draw diagram to explain this (with one level of recursion):

+--------------------------------------------------+
|Outer Level:                                      |
|                                                  |
|`lst = []`                                        |
|found file f1 with name fname                     |
|`lst.append(f1)`                                  |
|+------------------------------------------------+|
||Inner Level                                     ||
||                                                ||
||`lst=[]`                                        ||
||found file f2 with name fname                   ||
||`lst.append(f2)`                                ||
||`return lst`                                    ||
|+------------------------------------------------+|
|a list is returned from recursive call,           |
|but not assigned to a variable.                   |
|Therefore, `lst` remains unchanged                |
+--------------------------------------------------+

There are a couple of ways by which you can fix this:

  1. move lst to a scope outside findAll (personally, this is what I would do)
  2. use the return value from the recursive call to modify lst

move lst to a scope outside findAll

lst= []
def findAll(fname, path): 
    global lst
    for item in os.listdir(path):
        n = os.path.join(path, item)
        try: # really though, you don't need to use try/except here
            if item == fname:
                lst.append(n)
            else:
                findAll(fname,n)
        except:
            pass

After findAll has terminated, lst will contain the values you want

use the return value from the recursive call to modify lst

def findAll(fname, path, answer=None):
    if answer == None:
        answer = []
    for item in os.listdir(path):
        n = os.path.join(path, item)
        try:
            if item == fname:
                answer += [n]
        except:
            findAll(fname,n, answer)
    return answer

Hope this helps

PS: of course, the non-homework way to do this would be to use os.walk:

answer = []
def findAll(fname, dirpath):
    dirpath, dirnames, filenames = os.walk(dirpath)
    for filename in filenames:
        if filename == fname:
            answer.append(os.path.join(dirpath, filename))
    for dirname in dirnames:
        findAll(fname, os.path.join(dirpath, dirname))
# now, answer contains all the required filepaths

EDIT: OP asked for a version that doesn't use global variables:

def findAll(fname, root, answer=None):
    if answer == None:
        answer = []
     for entry in os.listdir(root):
         if os.path.isdir(os.path.join(root, entry)):
             answer += findAll(fname, os.path.join(root, entry))
         else:
             if entry == fname:
                 answer.append(os.path.join(root, entry))
     return answer
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findAll() inside except won't be called under ordinary conditions (no recursive calls are made). Globals should be avoided in this case either pass answer as a parameter or use yield –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 3 '12 at 5:11
    
@J.F.Sebastian: Duly noted about the except. I didn't want to add yield given that this might be for homework and OP therefore might be at a very beginner level. I agree though, that yield should be used –  inspectorG4dget Nov 3 '12 at 5:20
    
is there any way to not use a global variable/ –  brian Chiem Nov 5 '12 at 3:54
    
@brianChiem: Added a third solution that should work for you –  inspectorG4dget Nov 5 '12 at 4:41
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