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Our website has a configuration page such as "config.aspx", when the page initializing will load some infomations from a configuration file. To cache the loaded informations we provided a factory class and we call a public method of the factory to get the configuration instance when the page loaded. But sometimes when the Applciation Pool restarted, we found some error message in the Event Log such as below:

Message: Object reference not set to an instance of an object.
Stack:   at System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary`2.Insert(TKey key, TValue value, Boolean add)
   at System.Collections.Generic.Dictionary`2.set_Item(TKey key, TValue value)
   at ObjectFactory.GetInstance(string key)
   at config.Page_Load(Object sender, EventArgs e)
   at System.Web.Util.CalliHelper.EventArgFunctionCaller(IntPtr fp, Object o, Object t, EventArgs e)
   at System.Web.Util.CalliEventHandlerDelegateProxy.Callback(Object sender, EventArgs e)
   at System.Web.UI.Control.OnLoad(EventArgs e)
   at System.Web.UI.Control.LoadRecursive()
   at System.Web.UI.Page.ProcessRequestMain(Boolean includeStagesBeforeAsyncPoint, Boolean includeStagesAfterAsyncPoint)

The factory class implements like below:


public static class ObjectFactory
{
    private static object _InternalSyncObject;
    private static Dictionary _Instances;

    private static object InternalSyncObject
    {
        get
        {
            if (_InternalSyncObject == null)
            {
                var @object = new object();
                Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref _InternalSyncObject, @object, null);
            }

            return _InternalSyncObject;
        }
    }

    private static Dictionary Instances
    {
        get
        {
            if (_Instances == null)
            {
                lock (InternalSyncObject)
                {
                    if (_Instances == null)
                    {
                        _Instances = new Dictionary();
                    }
                }
            }

            return _Instances;
        }
    }

    private static object LoadInstance(string key)
    {
        object obj = null;

        // some statements to load an specific instance from a configuration file.

        return obj;
    }

    public static object GetInstance(string key)
    {
        object instance;

        if (false == Instances.TryGetValue(key, out instance))
        {
            instance = LoadInstance(key);

            Instances[key] = instance;
        }

        return instance;
    }
} 

I guess the exception was throwed by the line "Instances[key] = instance;", because its the only code could called set_Item method of a dictionary. But if the "Instances" value is null, it will thrown a NullReferenceException when call the TryGetValue method and the top frame of the stacktrace may be the GetInstance not the Insert. Does anyone know how the dictionary could thrown a NullReferenceException when call the set_Item method in multi-threading scenario?

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5 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

As the exception occurs internally in the Dictionary code, it means that you are accessing the same Dictionary instance from more than one thread at the same time.

You need to synchronise the code in the GetInstance method so that only one thread at a time accesses the Dictionary.

Edit:
Lock around the accesses separately, so that you aren't inside a lock while doing the (supposedly) time consuming loading:

private static object _sync = new object();

public static object GetInstance(string key) {
   object instance = null;
   bool found;
   lock (_sync) {
      found = Instances.TryGetValue(key, out instance);
   }
   if (!found) {
      instance = LoadInstance(key);
      lock (_sync) {
         object current;
         if (Instances.TryGetValue(key, out current)) {
            // some other thread already loaded the object, so we use that instead
            instance = current;
         } else {
            Instances[key] = instance;
         }
      }
   }
   return instance;
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Guffa: Thanks for your help, and I found the ICollection interface has a SyncRoot property, can I lock the SyncRoot object to replace the _sync object? By the way, I have tried some simulator multithreading scenario but could not found a way to throw the exception every time, how to test the problem was solved? –  Pag Sun Aug 25 '09 at 2:32
    
@Pag Sun: You ccould use the SyncRoot property to lock the code, but the common practice is to use a private object specifically created for this purpose. The problem with testing for thread safety is that you can only use it to prove that the code doesn't work, you can't use it to prove that the code works (only that it probably works). Knowledge about how to write thread safe code is the best tool. –  Guffa Aug 25 '09 at 5:46
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As of .Net 4 you have ConcurrentDictionary which is a thread-safe dictionary, no more need for "manual" synchronization.

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To quote http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/xfhwa508.aspx (emphasis added by me):

"Thread Safety

Public static (Shared in Visual Basic) members of this type are thread safe. Any instance members are not guaranteed to be thread safe.

A Dictionary<(Of <(TKey, TValue>)>) can support multiple readers concurrently, as long as the collection is not modified. Even so, enumerating through a collection is intrinsically not a thread-safe procedure. In the rare case where an enumeration contends with write accesses, the collection must be locked during the entire enumeration. To allow the collection to be accessed by multiple threads for reading and writing, you must implement your own synchronization."

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Yeah, maybe this is the case (Same as what Guffa said as well) - you need to lock around the Insert row, at least. You might get two threads not finding the same key, and reading and inserting it one after the other (Or 17 threads, theoretically), but the actual inserts will be in sync. –  Noam Gal Aug 24 '09 at 6:29
    
@Noam: Locking around just the insert doesn't make it thread safe, there has to be locks around all access to the dictionary. –  Guffa Aug 24 '09 at 6:54
    
But locking around just the inserts will make sure no two objects will be inserted at the same time. There might still be instances where a TryGetValue returns false, even while a different thread is inserting the needed value, but there won't be cases where two threads are trying to insert at the same time, which possibly caused the exception. –  Noam Gal Aug 24 '09 at 11:33
    
When I search the keywords like "dictionary set_Item NullReferenceException" and I found someone has commented after the msdn document about "Dictionary.Item Property" mentioned that: "Inserting an item may result in a NullReferenceException in threading scenarios where an item could have been added or removed during the insert call. Make sure to lock the dictionary before adding elements if your application uses multiple threads." But I still don't know how to meet the exception condition during debugging. The link is: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/9tee9ht2%28VS.85%29.aspx –  Pag Sun Aug 25 '09 at 2:03
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A better solution would be to create a synchronized dictionary. Here is one that will work in this situation. The ReaderWriterLockSlim I think is the best synchronization object to use in this situation. The writing to the dictionary will be pretty rare. Most of the time the key will be in the dictionary. I didn't implement all them methods of the dictionary, just the ones that were used in this case, so it isn't a complete synchronized dictionary.

public sealed class SynchronizedDictionary<TKey, TValue>
{
    private readonly Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dictionary = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    private readonly ReaderWriterLockSlim readerWriterLock = new ReaderWriterLockSlim();

    public TValue this[TKey key]
    {
    	get
    	{
    		readerWriterLock.EnterReadLock();
    		try
    		{
    			return this.dictionary[key];
    		}
    		finally
    		{
    			readerWriterLock.ExitReadLock();
    		}
    	}
    	set
    	{
    		readerWriterLock.EnterWriteLock();
    		try
    		{
    			this.dictionary[key] = value;
    		}
    		finally
    		{
    			readerWriterLock.ExitWriteLock();
    		}
    	}
    }

    public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value)
    {
    	readerWriterLock.EnterReadLock();
    	try
    	{
    		return this.dictionary.TryGetValue(key, out value);
    	}
    	finally
    	{
    		readerWriterLock.ExitReadLock();
    	}
    }
}
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I think your Instances Dictionary is not null. Your exception is from inside the Insert method - meaning that there is a Dictionary object at runtime (Also, as you've said, you have already had TryGetValue before, on the same reference) Could it be that your key is null?

EDIT

Just checked it - TryGetValue throws ArgumentNullException when it receives a null key, and so does insert with a null key. But what class are you using in your example? I used the generic IDictionary<string, string>, but I see you are using a non generic one. Is it a class you have inherited from DictionaryBase or maybe HashTable?

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The Instants is just a generic Dictionary<TKey, TValue> instance, the TKey is string type, and the TValue is a custom class extends System.Object in the real implements. –  Pag Sun Aug 25 '09 at 1:54
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