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I am getting an error which I have no idea how to fix. I am trying to work through the "producer-consumer" problem using spin-lock. I created a "Queue"-like data structure as a shared resource to put "produced" items in, and to remove items to be "consumed". This is what my main program looks like:

#include <pthread.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <time.h>
#include "Queue.h"

#define DEBUG 1

Queue_t* global_queue; // create a global queue

/* thread procedure for the producer thread */
void* producer_func(void* arg)
{
   while(1) // loops infinitely
   {
      int datum = rand() % global_queue->maximum_count;

      // spin while the queue is full
      while ((global_queue->current_count) ==
         (global_queue->maximum_count));

      enqueue(global_queue, datum);
      display(global_queue);
   }
}


/* thread procedure for the consumer thread */
void* consumer_func(void* arg)
{
   while(1) // loops infinitely
   {
      int datum = 0;

      // spin while there are no items in the queue
      while(global_queue->current_count == 0);

      datum = dequeue(global_queue);
      printf("The number consumed is %d\n");
   }
}


/* Main */
int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
   if(argc != 2)
   {
      printf("Error: wrong number of command-line arguments\n");
      printf("Usage: %s <integer>\n", argv[0]);
      exit(1);
   }

   pthread_t producer;  // create producer thread
   pthread_t consumer;  // create consumer thread

   // create the queue object, get the max queue size
   //int max_count = atoi(argv[1]);
   global_queue = construct(10);
   display(global_queue);

   // intialize the random seed generator
   srand((unsigned)time(NULL));

   // create the threads and have them execute their routines
   pthread_create(&producer, NULL, &producer_func, NULL);
   pthread_create(&consumer, NULL, &consumer_func, NULL);

   // join the threads to finish
   pthread_join(producer, NULL);
   pthread_join(consumer, NULL);

   // deallocate the queue from memory
   //destruct(global_queue);

   return 0;
}

However, when I call the pthread_create in main routine, I get a bizarre error in malloc.c:

queue_demo: malloc.c:3096: sYSMALLOc: Assertion `(old_top == (((mbinptr) (((char *) &((av)->bins[((1) - 1) * 2])) - __builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd)))) && old_size == 0) || ((unsigned long) (old_size) >= (unsigned long)((((__builtin_offsetof (struct malloc_chunk, fd_nextsize))+((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1)) & ~((2 * (sizeof(size_t))) - 1))) && ((old_top)->size & 0x1) && ((unsigned long)old_end & pagemask) == 0)' failed.
Aborted

Here is my "Queue" data structure header file:

#ifndef QUEUE_H
#define QUEUE_H

typedef struct Queue
{
   int  current_count;
   int  maximum_count;
   int  buffer[];       // queue uses an array
} Queue_t;


// routines to implement Queue-like functionality (FIFO)
// TODO: somehow encapsulate all these features in the struct itself.
//
Queue_t* construct(int buff_size);
void     destruct (Queue_t* queue);
void     display  (Queue_t* queue);
int      dequeue  (Queue_t* queue);
void     enqueue  (Queue_t* queue, const int datum);

#endif

And implementation:

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include "Queue.h"

Queue_t* construct(int buff_size)
{
   Queue_t* queue = malloc(sizeof(Queue_t));

   assert(queue != NULL);
   queue->maximum_count = buff_size;
   queue->current_count = 0;

   int i = 0;

   for(; i < queue->maximum_count; ++i)
      queue->buffer[i] = 0;

   return queue;
}

void destruct(Queue_t* queue)
{
   assert(queue != NULL);
   free(queue);
   printf("Queue destroyed!\n");
}

void display(Queue_t* queue)
{
   int i = 0;

   for(; i < queue->maximum_count; ++i)
      printf("%d ", queue->buffer[i]);
   printf("\n");
}

void enqueue(Queue_t* queue, const int datum)
{
   assert(queue->current_count < queue->maximum_count);
   queue->buffer[queue->current_count] = datum;
   ++queue->current_count;
}


int dequeue(Queue_t* queue)
{
   int i = 1;
   int datum = queue->buffer[0];

   assert(queue->current_count > 0);

   for(; i < queue->maximum_count; ++i)
   {
      queue->buffer[i-1] = queue->buffer[i];
      queue->buffer[i] = 0;
   }

   --queue->current_count;

   return datum;
}

Clearly, I am doing something very wrong. But I have no idea what exactly that is. I suspect it may have something to do with declaring the struct globally, but I am not sure. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
the homework tag is deprecated and has been removed from this. –  WhozCraig Nov 3 '12 at 6:13
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your construct() is not allocating space for the queue item data.

Queue_t* construct(int buff_size)
{
   Queue_t* queue = malloc(sizeof(Queue_t));

   assert(queue != NULL);
   queue->maximum_count = buff_size;
   queue->current_count = 0;

   int i = 0;

   // HERE. Where is the item data space allocation ??
   for(; i < queue->maximum_count; ++i)
      queue->buffer[i] = 0;

   return queue;
}

Try this instead:

Queue_t* construct(int buff_size)
{
   // note space allocation for buffer[] bytes as well as overall structure.
   Queue_t* queue = malloc(sizeof(Queue_t) + sizeof(int) * buff_size);

   assert(queue != NULL);
   queue->maximum_count = buff_size;
   queue->current_count = 0;
   memset(queue->buffer, 0, sizeof(int)*buff_size);
   return queue;
}

I've not reviewed the rest of your code to determine if you're properly protecting concurrent access to the queue (that pthread mention makes me suspect you should be adding, and initializing, a pthread_mutex_t to the members of your Queue_t type, and using it for guarding concurrent queue modification). Regardless, the above is most-definitely a problem and should be taken care of first.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, that did not seem to make a difference. I should have added in the output that the test statement in main where i called display(global_queue) worked, as the output read all zeros in the array with the maximum size (in this case 10). –  Dylan Nov 3 '12 at 5:52
    
@Dylan if it worked without making the change I mentioned above, then either (a) the structure is not defined as you have shown here, or (b) completely undefined behavior. Your posted code clearly does not allocate space for the items in the queue, only the Queue_t members. This will not work as defined behavior. That said, I'll spend some time reviewing the rest of your code. Can you post a simplified main() at the bottom of your question above that demonstrates the problem, as well as the thread proc you're invoking? thanks. –  WhozCraig Nov 3 '12 at 5:56
1  
@Dylan thanks for the updated post. As I suspected, your queue is exhibiting concurrency walk-over. You need a pthread_mutex_t to latch the queue during any access (push, pop, top, etc). Note that currently your producer can be shoving data into the queue and updating current_count intertwined with the consumer modifying (and relying on) the same members to pop data off. Do you understand, or would you like help adding this functionality? –  WhozCraig Nov 3 '12 at 6:00
    
I made test program for my Queue_t structure without threading and it worked consistently on my OS X machine. But I will note that my destruct routine didn't work, i.e. it throws a`free(): invalid next size` error. Also, the assignment we were given was to implement this first without using mutexes or semaphores, but just using a spin lock. Is this not possible using this kind of global structure? –  Dylan Nov 3 '12 at 6:02
    
@Dylan You can certainly do it with this. The spin-lock data, like the mutex, would be held in the Queue_t structure. Like the rest of the data in the queue object, it would be initialized at queue-creation, and destroyed at queue-destruction. Because you have a dedicated consumer and dedicated producer, a semaphore can work nicely as well, but ultimately you'll find using a mutex to be the easiest of these by far (imho). –  WhozCraig Nov 3 '12 at 6:07
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