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Why is it asking me to initialize the variable fin

FileInputStream fin;
File f = new File("C:/Users/NetBeansProjects/QuestionOne/input.txt");
fin = new FileInputStream(f);

When trying to close the file

fin.close();
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closed as not a real question by EJP, Ahmad, Cyrille, hims056, rene Nov 3 '12 at 10:41

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
where is fin.close()? Is your fin = new FileInputStream(f); present in some IF/ELSE block? Also, why not write FileInputStream fin = new FileInputStream("C:/Users/NetBeansProjects/QuestionOne/input.txt"); –  Vikdor Nov 3 '12 at 7:09
3  
Is that your actual code? I don't think it reflects what you are doing actually. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 3 '12 at 7:09
    
Where do you call fin.close? –  Ivan Koblik Nov 3 '12 at 7:09
    
Post the code with { and }, Java 7 may help with the syntax try( <open resource> ){ <code> } catch(...) {...} –  Aubin Nov 3 '12 at 7:10
    
Hmmmm Initialize fin with null and everything works fine...! I think you are calling fin some where in final block –  Patton Nov 3 '12 at 7:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I bet this is not exactly the same code that generated the compiler error. Almost sure you declared your variables outside the try-catch-finally block but you initialized them within the try block, which implies the variable may not be initialized in the context of the catch or finally blocks where the compiler error is occurring

For example:

FileInputStream fin;
try {
   File f = new File("C:/Users/NetBeansProjects/QuestionOne/input.txt");
   fin = new FileInputStream(f);
} finally {
   //you cannot be sure fin is initialized
   fin.close(); //compiler error
}

If you are using JDK 7 perhaps the best way is to use the try with resources to deal with the closing of your stream:

File f = new File("C:/Users/NetBeansProjects/QuestionOne/input.txt");
try(FileInputStream fin=new FileInputStream(f)) {
    //some input stream handlung here
}catch(IOException e){...} 
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That's true, I didn't know that was the reason! Thanks. –  InspiringProgramming Nov 3 '12 at 7:24

Because more probably you are using this snippet inside of a function, and inside functions variables are not automatically initialized, as they are if they are instance variables. If fin = new FileInputStream(f); throws an exception, and I think you have fin.close(); in a finally statement (but you didn't put entire code), the compiler doesn't know which is the value of fin in order to close it.

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Thank you! That's right. –  InspiringProgramming Nov 3 '12 at 7:23

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