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This might be due to margin collapsing and I know about margin collapsing, at least how it affects adjacent elements, but I don't understand how it works on nested elements when negative margins are involved.

For example, in this markup and accompanying CSS:

Markup

<div class="parent">
  <div class="child">
    Child 1
  </div>
</div>

<div class="parent">
  <div class="child negative">
    Child 1
  </div>
</div>

CSS

body {
  background: white;
  padding: 45px;
}

.parent {
  border: 1px solid black;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
}

.negative {
  margin-bottom: -1px;
}

Live example here.

When I inspect the height of the second .parent div, I notice it is 1 pixel less than the first one. This has happened because of the negative margin on the .negative element inside it. I had a quick look at W3C and couldn't find an explanation for this behavior.

Could someone please explain what's happening here and also provide me with a link to the W3C spec section about it?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This might be due to margin collapsing and I know about margin collapsing, at least how it affects adjacent elements, but I don't understand how it works on nested elements when negative margins are involved.

Section 8.3.1 has all the details. It also covers the behavior of adjoining margins between nested boxes, as well as negative margins.

However, what you're seeing here is not the effect of margin collapse because you have negated it with a border: 1px solid black declaration in your .parent rule. That means having a border there prevents your .parent margin from collapsing with your .child.negative margin altogether.

Rather, this is simply how negative margins work. This is covered in various sections of the visual formatting model, but it's most succinctly and directly addressed in the beginning of Section 11, which summarizes it thus:

Generally, the content of a block box is confined to the content edges of the box. In certain cases, a box may overflow, meaning its content lies partly or entirely outside of the box, e.g.:

  • ...
  • A descendant box has negative margins, causing it to be positioned partly outside the box.

So what's happening here, instead, is:

  1. The absolute value of the .child.negative element's negative margin is subtracted from the .parent element's actual height (by 1px).

  2. As a result, the .child.negative element itself overflows .parent (because its own height is not changed and the default overflow for any div is visible).

  3. Since margin collapse does not take effect here, the margin-bottom: 10px in your .parent is unaffected. Note that while any subsequent elements in normal flow will be shifted up by 1px, this is mainly due to the negative margin of your .child.negative element; in other words, a side effect of step 1.

And that's all there is to it.

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thanks for the answer. I used to use this technique every now and then and I had learned from experience that it works, but today I noticed that I don't know exactly why. Thanks for the link to the spec, but I still don't see where in the spec the rule #1 is written (I see "A descendant box has negative margins, causing it to be positioned partly outside the box." but not the fact that the height of the parent should be reduce. I think that's the only possible conclusion due to how negative margins work generally, but is it explained in more details somewhere?) –  h2o Nov 3 '12 at 9:02
    
Alternatively, do you by any chance know of an email in the W3C CSS mailing list re. how this should be implemented? –  h2o Nov 3 '12 at 9:03
    
@Bill Jobs: Yes, this is how negative margins work in general. A positive margin pushes a box away from other boxes and - if margin collapse isn't in place - causes its parent box to expand, and a negative margin pulls other boxes inward and additionally causes its parent box to shrink. –  BoltClock Nov 3 '12 at 9:05
    
@Bill Jobs: The general mailing list for any CSS issue is www-style@w3.org. Implementation questions are welcome there; some of the WG members are also implementers as well, which could be helpful :) –  BoltClock Nov 3 '12 at 9:07

when you are using .negative { margin-bottom: -1px; } then it will moved at the top. see this example.

enter image description here

please refer the following link you understand easily. http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2009/07/27/the-definitive-guide-to-using-negative-margins/

body {
  background: white;
  padding: 45px;
}

.parent {
  border: 1px solid black;
  margin-bottom: 10px;
  min-height: 30px;
}

.negative {
  margin-bottom: 20px;
}

conclusion:

For e.g. In your case i have to added min-height:30px to parent class so that it remains fix. if moved only if you add positive margins to negative class. It just because you can see results in above figure that tells all what you need is.

see the cssdesk link click here cssdesk

Hope, it will helps you. Cheers. !!

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Margins are routinely used for positioning, consider the top: 50%; height: 100px; margin-top: -50px; centering hack. –  lanzz Nov 3 '12 at 8:25
    
@lanzz, you are right. Thanks for such a guidence. –  MM Tac Nov 3 '12 at 8:36

Here's a link to W3Schools' section for box model. Please take a look at the picture below:

enter image description here

Margin is the outer dotted line and it represents the distance between two elements (where two elements touch, including parent-child elements). Setting the value for the margin specifies how much space to leave around the element; in other words - what is the least distance from other elements around it. Setting a negative value allows overlapping of elements (in case you want them to overlap, for example, the effect of images being dropped on a table etc).

For example:

  • If you set a margin to 5px, surrounding elements (in this case parent element) will stay 5x away from the element.

  • If you set it to 0px, surrounding elements will lean on this element (0px distance)

  • If you set it to a negative value, e.g. -5px, surrounding elements will overlap this element.

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4  
Citing a W3Schools article as an answer to a question that specifically asks for a link to the W3C spec is suicide. –  BoltClock Nov 3 '12 at 8:07

Margins of first and last elements will apply to outer element when the outer element doesn't have border, padding and content, instead of it self.

In your case, parent node has border, so margin collapsing won't apply in this case. As you have margin-bottom = -1px for the child node inside, when calculate the outer height of the child node will be the height of its content + padding + border-width + margin. So it will be 1px less when measuring from outside. That's why the height of parent node will be 1px less than the upper example. To see it more clearly, you may apply a background to the child node, say yellow, you will find that the child node will overlap the border of the parent node.

But if you remove the border of the parent node, it will be a total different situation.

For instance to explain margin collapsing, say you have

<div style="background-color:black">
  <div style="height:10px; background-color:white; margin-top: 10px"></div>
</div>

You will not see a black box of 10px height, as the outer node will be considered to have a 10px margin on top, and the inner one's margin is ignored. And for negative situation, the outer margin will decrease.

Quote from spec:

When two or more margins collapse, the resulting margin width is the maximum of the collapsing margins' widths. In the case of negative margins, the maximum of the absolute values of the negative adjoining margins is deducted from the maximum of the positive adjoining margins. If there are no positive margins, the maximum of the absolute values of the adjoining margins is deducted from zero.

For more info: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/CSS/margin_collapsing

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1  
@BoltClock I don't think I need to explain why 10-1 is 9. And voting everyone down doesn't help at all. –  xiaoyi Nov 3 '12 at 8:20
    
In that case, your answer is completely irrelevant. I vote an answer down when it is wrong or irrelevant... that's the entire point of having the downvote button. –  BoltClock Nov 3 '12 at 8:22
    
How it's irrelevant? this is the right explanation to the question. –  xiaoyi Nov 3 '12 at 8:23
1  
@BoltClock you are right, the border applied. I was wrong. –  xiaoyi Nov 3 '12 at 8:28

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