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I have a global var foo="some value" and a background process back_func, I want to the background process to access $foo and modify its value, which can be seen by the main process. It's something like the following:

#!/bin/bash
foo=0

function back_func {
     foo=$(($foo+1))
     echo "back $foo"
}

(back_func) &
echo "global $foo"

The result of the above script is

global 0
back 1

How could I get the result of global and back are both '1'?, i.e. the back ground process's modification can return back to the main process.

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Is the "main process" another bash script? Does it restart periodically? –  ct_ Nov 3 '12 at 8:29
    
what is the motivation for using an environment variable? The transport of the information could IMHO be done via a file which is much simpler to share. –  Wolfgang Fahl Nov 3 '12 at 8:53
    
@ct_ Yes the main process is another periodically running bash script. –  algosolo Nov 3 '12 at 10:17
    
@WolfgangFahl There are actually many such kind of vars, if for each var we create a file for sharing its value, it would be more complicate to manage the whole program. But for small size of program it's a nice idea to share values via file. –  algosolo Nov 3 '12 at 10:20
    
@algosolo OK. If the main process (let's call it main.sh) is another periodically running bash script then you could simply have the the other script (let's call it other.sh) write the value to a file (let's call this file value.sh). **other.sh** #! /bin/bash echo "SOME_VAR=42" > /tmp/value.sh **main.sh** #! /bin/bash . /tmp/other.sh # Now SOME_VAR will be set –  ct_ Nov 3 '12 at 11:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Rendez-vous

If you wanna have two independant process which could communicate, you have to place a rendez-vous somewhere both process can reach.

This could be a simple file, a fifo pipe, a unix socket, a TCP socket or maybe else (Rexx port).

and other

Bash don't have a equivalent to rexx port, so there is a little sample, using a rendez-vous file, that work (on my Linux).

I'm using shared memory /dev/shm, to reduce disk load.

Simple counter sample

$ back_func() {
    while :;do
        echo $(($(</dev/shm/foo)+1)) >/dev/shm/foo;
        sleep .3;
      done;
}

Let play

$ echo 1 >/dev/shm/foo
$ back_func &

$ echo $(</dev/shm/foo)
4

$ echo $(</dev/shm/foo)
21

Than stop now:

$ fg
back_func
^C

or

$ kill $!
$
[1]+  Terminated              back_func

More than one variables

For having many vars, there could by a nice manner:

$ back_func() {
    declare -A MYGLOBAL
    local vars
    while :; do
        ((MYGLOBAL["counter"]++))
        IFS=\ / read -a vars <<< "$(</proc/uptime) $(</proc/loadavg)"
        MYGLOBAL["uptime"]=$vars
        MYGLOBAL["idle"]=${vars[1]}
        MYGLOBAL["l01m"]=${vars[2]}
        MYGLOBAL["l05m"]=${vars[3]}
        MYGLOBAL["l15m"]=${vars[4]}
        MYGLOBAL["active"]=${vars[5]}
        MYGLOBAL["procs"]=${vars[6]}
        MYGLOBAL["lpid"]=${vars[7]}
        MYGLOBAL["rand"]=$RANDOM
        MYGLOBAL["crt"]=$SECONDS
        declare -p MYGLOBAL > /dev/shm/foo
        sleep 1
    done
}

Then

$ back_func &
[1] 27429
$ . /dev/shm/foo
$ echo ${MYGLOBAL['counter']}
5
$ echo ${MYGLOBAL['lpid']}
27432

and from there, why not:

$ dumpMyGlobal() {
    . /dev/shm/foo
    printf "%8s " ${!MYGLOBAL[@]}
    echo
    printf "%8s " ${MYGLOBAL[@]}
    echo
}

$ dumpMyGlobal
    l15m   uptime      crt    procs     lpid   active     rand     idle     l05m
  counter     l01m 
    0.42 13815568.06       95      554      649        1    31135 21437004.95   
  0.38       73     0.50 
$ dumpMyGlobal
    l15m   uptime      crt    procs     lpid   active     rand     idle     l05m
  counter     l01m 
    0.41 13815593.29      120      553      727        2     3849 21437046.41   
  0.35       98     0.33 

or

$ dumpMyGlobal() {
    . /dev/shm/foo
    sort <(
        paste <(
            printf "%-12s\n" ${!MYGLOBAL[@]}
          ) <(printf "%s\n" ${MYGLOBAL[@]})
    )
}

$ dumpMyGlobal
active              1
counter             297
crt                 337
idle                21435798.86
l01m                0.40
l05m                0.44
l15m                0.45
lpid                30418
procs               553
rand                7328
uptime              13814820.80

Get variable with snapshot

and finally getMyGlobalVar function

$ declare -A MYGLOBALLOCK   # snapshot variable
$ getMyGlobalVar () { 
    local i sync=false
    [ "$1" == "--sync" ] && shift && sync=true
    if [ -z "${MYGLOBALLOCK[*]}" ] || $sync; then
        . /dev/shm/foo
        for i in ${!MYGLOBAL[@]}
        do
            MYGLOBALLOCK[$i]=${MYGLOBAL[$i]}
        done
    fi
    echo ${MYGLOBALLOCK[$1]}
}

will require --sync flag for re-reading rendez-vous in order to let you look about each fields from the same snapshot.

$ getMyGlobalVar --sync idle
362084.12

$ getMyGlobalVar idle
362084.12

$ getMyGlobalVar rand
1533

$ getMyGlobalVar rand
1533

$ getMyGlobalVar --sync rand
43256

$ getMyGlobalVar idle
362127.63
share|improve this answer
    
+1, didn't know about /dev/shm/, quite useful –  etuardu Nov 3 '12 at 16:45

According to the Bash manual here,

If a command is terminated by the control operator ‘&’, the shell executes the command asynchronously in a subshell.

And since a process run in a subshell cannot modify the environment of the parent shell, I guess what you are trying to do is only possible via temp files / named pipes. Or you could rethink your approach.

share|improve this answer

If the main process (let's call it main.sh) is another periodically running bash script then you could simply have the the other script (let's call it other.sh) write the value to a file (let's call this file value.sh).

other.sh

#! /bin/bash  
echo "SOME_VAR=42" > /tmp/value.sh

main.sh

#! /bin/bash  
. /tmp/value.sh  
# Now you can use SOME_VAR
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