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I have already implemented some of the recommendations before in Code Review. I also improved my code by using pointers. However, what is wrong with address incrementation part below squeezed_str++? It seems that address is not incrementing. Please advise.

PS. substring() function is working. :)

char *squeeze (char *str, int start_index, int end_index, char *ref_str) {
     char *substr;
     substr = malloc (sizeof (*substr));
     if (substr == NULL) {
          printf ("Unable to allocate memory.\n");
          exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
     }

     char *squeezed_str;
     squeezed_str = malloc (sizeof (*squeezed_str));
     if (squeezed_str == NULL) {
          printf ("Unable to allocate memory!\n");
          exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
     }

     substr = substring (str, start_index, end_index);
     int substr_len = strlen (substr);
     int refstr_len = strlen (ref_str);

     char chr1, chr2; chr1 = chr2 = '\0';

     for (int i = 0; i < substr_len; i++) {
          chr1 = *(substr+i);
          for (int j = 0; j < refstr_len; j++) {
               chr2 = *(ref_str + j);
               if (chr1 == chr2) {
                    break;
               }
          }
          if (chr1 != chr2) {
               *squeezed_str = *(substr+i);
               squeezed_str++;
          }     
     }

     return squeezed_str;
 } /* end of squeeze() */
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closed as too localized by Mat, Pascal Cuoq, Jonathan Leffler, alestanis, Andre Nov 4 '12 at 13:05

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5  
The two mallocs are really strange. sizeof(*subtr) == sizeof(char). –  Mat Nov 3 '12 at 8:51
    
sizeof(char*) gives 4 or 8 bytes typically; strlen(char*) gives the length of the string –  Aki Suihkonen Nov 3 '12 at 8:52
1  
@Pubby: already formatted. –  chrismsawi Nov 3 '12 at 8:56
1  
@DavidRF: thanks –  chrismsawi Nov 3 '12 at 8:57
2  
@chrismsawi , the reccomendation you read was int *ptr = malloc( sizeof(*ptr) ); this allocs space for one integer, you want to alloc space for the content of char *, then malloc(strlen(str)+1) do the trick –  Alter Mann Nov 3 '12 at 9:29

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Some improvements with inline advice, not tested:

char *squeeze (char *str, int start_index, int end_index, char *ref_str) {
     char *substr = substring (str, start_index, end_index);
         //do not malloc here!, you are doing an assignment later on, so memory leak
         //infact might as well move assignment right here

     char *squeezed_str;
     squeezed_str = malloc (strlen(str)+1); //+ 1 one for null terminator
     if (squeezed_str == NULL) {
          printf ("Unable to allocate memory!\n");
          exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
     }

     int substr_len = strlen (substr);
     int refstr_len = strlen (ref_str);
     int squeezeStrIdx = 0;

     for (int i = 0; i < substr_len; i++) {
          char chr1 = substr[i]; //using index accessing is nicer
                                 //moved the scope of the variable in
          char chr2 = '\0'; //reduced variable scope, benefit is now resets each loop
          for (int j = 0; j < refstr_len; j++) {
               chr2 = ref_str[j];
               if (chr1 == chr2) {
                    break;
               }
          }
          if (chr1 != chr2) {
               squeezed_str[squeezeStrIdx] = chr1;
               squeezeStrIdx++; //if you modify squeezed_str,
                                //how do you expect to return it at end of method?
          }     
     }

     //this is to null terminate the squeezed_str
     squeezed_str[squeezeStrIdx] = '\0';

     return squeezed_str;
 } /* end of squeeze() */
share|improve this answer
    
this actually did the trick. it works! thank you. however, maybe for the last question. i stil don't get why you introduce another variable, squeezeStrIdx to act as the array index. why is this so? please advise more. –  chrismsawi Nov 3 '12 at 9:29
1  
He introduced another variable to not lose the pointer malloc returned. See my answer, I did the same thing but using another pointer. –  Patrick Schlüter Nov 3 '12 at 9:38
1  
At the end of the function you return the pointer squeezed_str. Your code was incrementing this pointer, so what you were returning would be the pointer at the end of your squeezed_str. So the extra variable is to keep track of where we are writing to without needing to alter the squeezed_str pointer. It just goes up like 0,1,2,3,4 and is used as an offset into the squeezed_str array. –  weston Nov 3 '12 at 9:40
1  
I just added an improvement, once we are done filling the squeezed_str, we should null terminate it. The squeezeStrIdx offset is in the right place to do this. –  weston Nov 3 '12 at 9:44

One thing completely flawed is to modify squeezed_str at all. This is the address returned by malloc. If you modify it you won't be able to free that memory area later on. You built a memory leak or even worse, you built a crash when you call free at the end.

EDIT:

 char *squeeze (const char *str, size_t start_index, size_t end_index, const char *ref_str) 
 /* You don't modify `str` and `ref_str` so it is a good idea to make it visible in the signature of the function, whence the const qualifiers */
 {
 char *substr;   
 /* Snip the memory leak */

 char *squeezed_str = malloc (sizeof (*squeezed_str));
 if (!squeezed_str) {
      fprintf (stderr, "Unable to allocate memory!\n");  /* Error are to be written on stderr */
      exit (EXIT_FAILURE);     /* Exitting the app in a function is not good style */
 }

 substr = substring (str, start_index, end_index);
 size_t substr_len = strlen (substr);       /* strlen returns size_t not int */
 size_t refstr_len = strlen (ref_str);

 char chr1 = 0, chr2 = 0;
 char *squeezed_copy = squeezed_str;       /* We use a second pointer to not lose the malloc'ed area */
 for (size_t i = 0; i < substr_len; i++) {
      chr1 = substr[i];                     /* This syntax is simpler (you'll see when you have nested structures */
      for (size_t j = 0; j < refstr_len; j++) {
           chr2 = ref_str[j];
           if (chr1 == chr2) {
                break;
           }
      }
      if (chr1 != chr2)
           *squeezed_copy++ = substr[i];
 }
 /* Add the NUL sentinel */
 *squeezed_copy++ = 0;

 return squeezed_str;
} /* end of squeeze() */

This said, I haven't checked the algorithm if it does what you intended to do. In a hunch I would say that using strstr would be a better idea.

share|improve this answer
    
this also did the trick! thanks! :) –  chrismsawi Nov 3 '12 at 9:42
1  
one question i would like to raise. you said that "Exitting the app in a function is not good style", why is this so and how should i improved mine? as i read your code, i got many things that are very helpful, consistent implementation. thank you very much. –  chrismsawi Nov 3 '12 at 9:48
1  
Within 1 small program, exiting in a function is not that bad, but if your function is a utility function (destined in the end to be part of a library) it can be confusing when your program, calling that function, suddenly stops without giving the caller the chance to clean-up (closing files, sockets, signalling, whatever...). –  Patrick Schlüter Nov 3 '12 at 11:20
    
A function may use a return error_code instead. The caller, of course, has then to take action depending on the error returned. For bigger programs it's the better approach, the caller can ignore or handle correctly the errors. –  Patrick Schlüter Nov 3 '12 at 11:23
    
thank you very much. i'll try to implement your suggestions. :) –  chrismsawi Nov 3 '12 at 14:51

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