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I need multiple cases in switch statement in JavaScript, Something like:

switch (varName)
{
   case "afshin", "saeed", "larry": 
       alert('Hey');
       break;

   default: 
       alert('Default case');
       break;
}

How can I do that? If there's no way to do something like that in JavaScript, I want to know an alternative solution that also follows DRY concept.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 288 down vote accepted

Use the fall-through feature of the switch statement. A matched case will run until a break (or the end of the switch statement) is found, so you could write it like:

switch (varName)
{
   case "afshin":
   case "saeed":
   case "larry": 
       alert('Hey');
       break;

   default: 
       alert('Default case');
}
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2  
1  
Somehow it works for me in Chrome, in the javascript console: switch('10') { case 1, '10': console.log('ok') } prints ok –  nafg Sep 3 '13 at 4:18
6  
@nafg: Try switch(1). The label here is just a comma expression. –  kennytm Sep 3 '13 at 7:10
    
Isn't break at the every end of the statement redundant? –  Barney Nov 23 '14 at 12:09
    
@Barney No, without the break you can fall through to the next case. –  Seiyria Apr 24 at 17:21

Here's different approach avoiding the switch statement altogether:

var cases = {
  afshin: function() { alert('hey'); },
  _default: function() { alert('default'); }
};
cases.larry = cases.saeed = cases.afshin;

cases[ varName ] ? cases[ varName ]() : cases._default();
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2  
I definitely prefer this version. Fall through is a bug-prone feature of switch ... case. It's too easy to forget a break statement, and if you use fall through intentionally, those forgotten break statements can be very hard to spot. This method lookup version also has lots of great features that switch ... case lacks, such as dynamic extensibility, or the ability to completely replace the object to accomplish mode switching. It's also easier to keep cleanly organized, and can lead to more maintainable code. See ericleads.com/2012/12/switch-case-considered-harmful –  Eric Elliott Sep 22 '13 at 11:28
4  
I always add a comment //fallthrough in place of break whenever I intentionally omit the break. That helps to identify when it's a mistake and when it's intentional. –  Mnebuerquo Jul 24 '14 at 13:58
3  
Intuitive approach. However, for readability, I'd recommend to use the native switch statement. –  contactmatt Nov 12 '14 at 15:01
5  
One can always scratch the left ear passing its right hand through the back of the neck... (sorry for my english, I mean: "one can always complicate things as much as possible...in this case, avoiding the switch statement in favor of this complicated solution doesn't seem to be the right thing to do...) –  Jonathan Nov 17 '14 at 13:53
    
Nah, switch is antipattern in my book. This is not complicated at all, on the contrary, it is a common alternative, and obviously better for maintainability and refactoring, as you can now move the cases around, because you got expressions, not statements. –  elclanrs Nov 17 '14 at 20:57

In Js for assign multiple cases in switch We have to define different case without break like given below:

   <script type="text/javascript">
      function checkHere(varName){
        switch (varName)
           {
           case "saeed":
           case "larry":
           case "afshin":
                alert('Hey');
                break;
          case "ss":
             alert('ss');
             break;
         default:
             alert('Default case');
             break;
       }
      }
     </script>

Please see example click on link

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3  
It's a common technique in a pletora of languages, not bound to JS –  AlberT Dec 12 '13 at 15:06

You could try this:

if (['afshin', 'saeed', 'larry'].indexOf(varName) !== -1) {
   alert('Hey');
} else {
   alert('Default case');
}

Note that this won't work in older IE browsers, but you could patch things up fairly easily. See the question determine if string is in list in javascript for more information.

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you can use the 'in' operator...
relies on the object/hash invocation...
so its as fast as javascript can be...

// assuming you have defined functions f(), g(a) and h(a,b) 
// somewhere in your code
// you can define them inside the object but... 
// the code becomes hard to read, I prefer this way

o = { f1:f, f2:g, f3:h };

// if you use "STATIC" code can do:
o['f3']( p1, p2 )

// if your code is someway "DYNAMIC", to prevent false invocations
// m brings the function/method to be invoked (f1, f2, f3)
// and you can rely on arguments[] to solve any parameter problems
if ( m in o ) o[m]()

Enjoy, ZEE

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