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I have a file:

pablo tty8 Thu Nov 1 12:51:21 2012 still logged in 
(unknown tty8 Thu Nov 1 12:50:57 2012 - Thu Nov 1 12:51:21 2012 (00:00) 
pablo tty2 Thu Nov 1 12:50:39 2012 still logged in 
pablo tty7 Thu Nov 1 12:49:45 2012 - Thu Nov 1 12:50:56 2012 (00:01) 
(unknown tty7 Thu Nov 1 12:34:32 2012 - Thu Nov 1 12:49:45 2012 (00:15)

I want to replace the file in the above date for a second. I want to print:

pablo tty8 1351770681 still logged in 
(unknown tty8 1351770657 - 1351770681 (00:00) 
pablo tty2 1351770639 still logged in 
pablo tty7 1351770585 - 1351770656 (00:01) 
(unknown tty7 1351769672 - 1351770585 (00:15)

I tried this command:

gawk --posix 'function my()
{"date -d \047"$0"\047 +%s" | getline b; 
gsub( /[A-Za-z]{3} [A-Za-z]{3} [0-9] ([0-9]{2}:){2}[0-9]{2} [0-9]{4}/,b ); print}
{ my() }' file

The above command does not work:

$ gawk --posix 'function my()
> {"date -d \047"$0"\047 +%s" | getline b; 
> gsub( /[A-Za-z]{3} [A-Za-z]{3} [0-9] ([0-9]{2}:){2}[0-9]{2} [0-9]{4}/,b ); print}
> { my() }' ta
date: błędna data: `pablo tty8 Thu Nov 1 12:51:21 2012 still logged in '
pablo tty8  still logged in 
(unknown tty8 1351897200 - 1351897200 (00:00) 
date: błędna data: `pablo tty2 Thu Nov 1 12:50:39 2012 still logged in '
pablo tty2 1351897200 still logged in 
date: błędna data: `pablo tty7 Thu Nov 1 12:49:45 2012 - Thu Nov 1 12:50:56 2012 (00:01) '
pablo tty7 1351897200 - 1351897200 (00:01) 
(unknown tty7 1351897200 - 1351897200 (00:15)

How to improve the above command?

Thank you for your help.

share|improve this question
2  
Please don't double post: unix.stackexchange.com/q/53724/4667 –  glenn jackman Nov 3 '12 at 20:07
    
@glenn jackman, Sorry for the duplicate topic in another forum. –  Tedee12345 Nov 4 '12 at 9:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's one way using GNU awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file.txt

Contents of script.awk:

{
    line = ($0 ~ /still logged in/) ? "still logged in" : "-" OFS getstamp(10) OFS $NF
    print $1, $2, getstamp(4), line
} 

function getstamp(i) {

    split($(i + 2), T, ":")

    Y = $(i + 3)
    M = convert($i)
    D = $(i + 1)

    hrs = T[1] + 9
    min = T[2]
    sec = T[3]

    return(mktime(sprintf("%d %d %d %d %d %d", Y, M, D, hrs, min, sec)))
}

function convert(month) {

    return(((index("JanFebMarAprMayJunJulAugSepOctNovDec", month) - 1) / 3) + 1)
}

Results:

pablo tty8 1351770681 still logged in
(unknown tty8 1351770657 - 1351770681 (00:00)
pablo tty2 1351770639 still logged in
pablo tty7 1351770585 - 1351770656 (00:01)
(unknown tty7 1351769672 - 1351770585 (00:15)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for a good solution. I just wonder if you can do it my way? –  Tedee12345 Nov 3 '12 at 17:24
    
@Tedee12345: I've updated the script to produce the exact results you require. I'm not sure why the hours needs to be adjusted by nine, but it gives you the results you want. Also, I would avoid calls to date like you're trying to do. awk has some good in-build time functions and date is unnecessary. HTH. –  Steve Nov 4 '12 at 3:19
    
Thanks again for your help. –  Tedee12345 Nov 4 '12 at 6:46
    
Thanks mate! Glad I could help. Cheers. –  Steve Nov 4 '12 at 6:55

If you have vim installed, try this command:

:%s/\v\w+\s\w+\s\d+\s\d+:\d+:\d+\s\d+/\=system('date +%s -d"'.submatch(0).'" | tr -d "\n"')/g

The idea is very simple. vim can be very quick.

share|improve this answer
    
And just when I thought I'd done well +1 –  Steve Nov 3 '12 at 12:26
    
Thank you for a good solution –  Tedee12345 Nov 4 '12 at 6:45

Here's a solution using date in awk (possibly gawk only)

awk --posix '
{
  while(match($0,/([[:alpha:]]{3} ){2}[^[:alpha:]]+[0-9]{4}/)){
    date_str=substr($0, RSTART, RLENGTH)
    "date -d \""date_str"\" +%s" | getline date_sec
    sub(date_str,date_sec,$0)
  }
  print
}
' $1

Output:

pablo tty8 1351745481 still logged in 
(unknown tty8 1351745457 - 1351745457 (00:00) 
pablo tty2 1351745439 still logged in 
pablo tty7 1351745385 - 1351745456 (00:01) 
(unknown tty7 1351744472 - 1351744472 (00:15)

Notes:

  1. match-substr combination is used to extract the substring containing the date.
  2. Use date to convert the date substring to seconds format (+%s)and assign the seconds to date_sec
  3. Substitute the string-format date with the second-format date.
  4. Iterate until no match is found (match returns 0 if no match found which terminates the while loop)
  5. Interval expressions are only allowed in gawk with --re-interval or --posix option
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for another good solution. –  Tedee12345 Nov 4 '12 at 8:53
    
It's not gawk-only, it'll work in any POSIX awk and any other awk that supports RE intervals. You added --posix so gawk would handle RE intervals like {3} correctly but FYI that's the default behavior in newer gawk releases and in older ones it's better to use --re-interval than --posix as the latter disables all other GNU awk extension, like gensub() and the time functions. Finally, you don't need to invoke an external "date" command with gawk since it has it's own built in time functions. –  Ed Morton Nov 5 '12 at 16:43

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