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Visual studio is giving me all sorts of warnings about not awaiting my MessageDialog.ShowAsync() and Launcher.LaunchUriAsync() methods.

It says:

"consider applying the await keyword"

Obviously I don't NEED to await them but is would it be beneficial to?

Awaiting the call obviously blocks the UI thread which is bad - so why does Visual Studio throw up so many warnings?

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Does msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh965065.aspx help? –  ta.speot.is Nov 3 '12 at 11:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Awaiting the call obviously blocks the UI thread which is bad

await doesn't actually block the UI. await suspends the execution of the method until the awaited task completes and then continues the rest of the method. Read more about await (C# Reference).

Obviously I don't NEED to await them but is would it be beneficial to?

If you don't use await, then the method calling MessageDialog.ShowAsync() may be completed before MessageDialog.ShowAsync() is completed. You don't need to, but it's good practice.

For example, let's say you want to download a string and use it, without await:

async void MyAsyncMethod()
{
    var client = new HttpClient();
    var task = client.GetStringAsync("http://someurl.com/someAction");

    // Here, GetStringAsync() may not be finished when getting the result
    // and it will block the UI thread until GetStringAsync() is completed.
    string result = task.Result;
    textBox1.Text = result; 
}

But if we use await:

async void MyAsyncMethod()
{
    var client = new HttpClient();
    string result = await client.GetStringAsync("http://someurl.com/someAction");

    // This method will be suspended at the await operator, 
    // awaiting GetStringAsync() to be completed,
    // without freezing the UI, and then continues this method.

    textBox1.Text = result;
}
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1  
The first version of the method blocks the calling/UI thread until the task completes when you access the Result property. –  James Manning Nov 3 '12 at 21:36
    
@JamesManning You are correct, what was I thinking. I updated the comments. Next time I'll do a better example =) Thanks for pointing it out. –  Mario Nov 4 '12 at 10:42

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