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I am trying to have dynamically allocate arrays of structures and perform operations on them but i keep running into segmentation faults. could someone help me out?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

void *malloc(size_t size);

typedef struct {
  double x;
  double y;
} coords;

struct figure {
  char fig_name[128];
  int coordcount, size_tracker;
  coords *pointer;
} fig;

void init_fig(int n, struct figure **point)
{
  printf("%u\n", sizeof(coords));
  point[n]->pointer = malloc(sizeof(coords) * 20);  <-------SEGFAULT
  if (point[n]->pointer == NULL){
    exit(-1);
  }
  point[n]->pointer[19].x = 2;
  point[n]->pointer[0].x = 1;
  point[n]->pointer[0].y = 2;
  point[n]->pointer[7].x = 100;
}

int main()
{
  int numfigs = 1;
  struct figure * point;
  point = malloc(sizeof(struct figure) * 16);
  point = &fig;
  point[1].coordcount = 1;
  init_fig(numfigs, &point);
  return 0;
}

I labelled where the first seg fault occurs, (used ddd). what i dont get is that i can manipulate point[1] in main but not in any other function.

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this is not my project it is simply a short test file ive been using to try and figure out why im geting seg faults –  user1787262 Nov 3 '12 at 11:14
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with @Maxim Skurydin. Nevertheless I'd like to explain your mistake in some more details.

Reading your init_fig one assumes that the parameter you pass struct figure **point - is actually array of pointers to struct figure. And this function accesses its n'th element.

However in your main you do something else. You allocate an array of struct figure, and your point variable points to its head. Then you take the address of this local variable and call your init_fig.

Here's the problem. init_fig assumes that you pass it an array of pointers, whereas actually this "array" consists of a single element only: the local point variable declared in main.

EDIT:

How to do this properly.

  1. Leave main intact, fix init_fig.

This means that actually there's an array of figure structs. Means - a single memory block, interpreted as an array of consequent structs.

void init_fig(int n, struct figure *point)
{
  printf("%u\n", sizeof(coords));
  point[n].pointer = malloc(sizeof(coords) * 20);  <-------SEGFAULT
  if (point[n].pointer == NULL){
    exit(-1);
  }
  point[n].pointer[19].x = 2;
  point[n].pointer[0].x = 1;
  point[n].pointer[0].y = 2;
  point[n].pointer[7].x = 100;
}
  1. Leave init_fig intact. Fix main.

This means that we actually should allocate an array of pointers, every such a pointer should point to an allocated point structure.

int main()
{
  int numfigs = 1;
  struct figure ** point;
  point = malloc(sizeof(struct figure*) * 16);

  for (i = 0; i < 16; i++)
    point[i] = malloc(sizeof(struct figure));

  point[1].coordcount = 1;
  init_fig(numfigs, &point);
  return 0;
}
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hmm.. do you mind me asking how I do this properly then? should my functions take in a struct figure *point? or should I initialize a struct figure **point in main. sorry im a bit new to this. –  user1787262 Nov 3 '12 at 11:30
    
ok i did option 1 but now I can assign things to point[n].pointer[233] which is far outside the allocated 20. why does this work? should i have a seg fault? point[n].pointer[233].x = 2; printf("%lf\n", point[n].pointer[233].x); –  user1787262 Nov 3 '12 at 11:44
    
@user1787262 Writing or reading outside the allocated memory is undefined behaviour. It crashes immediately if you're very lucky, it corrupts important data and crashes later if you're less lucky. Just don't do it. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 3 '12 at 11:52
    
okay,thank goodness you explained that there. I had originally done my program the way you described above but was confused when I could write outside my allocated bound. but now that you explained it I understand THANK YOU! @DanielFischer –  user1787262 Nov 3 '12 at 11:54
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You allocate memory and store the pointer in point but then you forget that pointer when you assign &fig to it.

point = malloc(sizeof(struct figure) * 16);
point = &fig;

So, you are essentially trying to write fig[1], that does not make sense.

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  struct figure * point;
  point = malloc(sizeof(struct figure) * 16);

here point is pointer pointing to memory of 16 structures in heap but in the next line you have done this

  point = &fig;

so its memory leak and also point is not pointing to that allocated region anymore

and also init_fig should be like this

void init_fig(int n, struct figure **point)

It's the problem of segfault

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Eliminate this line point = &fig;

and modify or function:

void init_fig(int n, struct figure *point)
{
  ...
  point[n].pointer = (coords*) malloc(sizeof(coords) * 20);
  ...
}

Since you should pass an array of structs (like you had created) and not a array of pointers

Also, i suggest you to add a third parameter to your init_fig function passing the size of the array of points that you want to create. Like :

void init_fig(int n, struct figure *point, int size)
    {
      ...
      point[n].pointer = (coords*) malloc(sizeof(coords) * size);
      ...
    }

Therefore, making the function more reusable.

and modify the call also:

init_fig(numfigs, &point); to init_fig(numfigs, point);
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i did this and i got an error tester.c:18:6: note: expected ‘struct figure *’ but argument is of type ‘struct figure **’ –  user1787262 Nov 3 '12 at 11:51
    
It could be because i test with struct figure * point; (on the main) and you are using struct figure ** point. Nevertheless, i am glad that you already solve your problem :) –  dreamcrash Nov 3 '12 at 12:14
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