Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've tried using a tripple pointer, but it keeps failing. Code:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int set(int *** list) {
  int count, i;
  printf("Enter number:\n");
  scanf("%d", &count);
  (*list) = (int **) malloc ( sizeof (int) * count);

  for ( i = 0; i<count;i++ ) {
    (**list)[count] = 123;
  }
  return count;
}

int main ( int argc, char ** argv )
{
  int ** list;
  int count;

  count = set(&list);

  return 0;
}

Thanks for any advice

share|improve this question
4  
I made myself a rule long ago that if my code has *** anywhere I have to rewrite it. –  Pete Becker Nov 3 '12 at 11:25
    
I've heard of this rule, but in this case, *** will save creating a function that would be called only once. –  Grant Nov 3 '12 at 11:28
    
No, it doesn't mean recoding, it means redesigning your data structures so that you don't need all those layers of indirection. –  Pete Becker Nov 3 '12 at 11:31
1  
yOu should use (**list)[i]=123 instead of (**list)[count]=123 –  Omkant Nov 3 '12 at 11:39
    
@Grant :writing [count] at index is that correct ? what do you exactly want –  Omkant Nov 3 '12 at 11:48

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you call list is actually an array. You might do it the following way:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int set(int ** ppList) 
{
  int count = 0;

  printf("Enter number:\n");
  scanf("%d", &count);

  (*ppList) = malloc(count * sizeof (**ppList));

  if (!ppList)
    return -1;

  {
    int i = 0;
    for (; i < count; ++i) 
    {
      (*ppList)[i] = 123;
    }
  }

  return count;
}

int main (int argc, char ** argv)
{
  int * pList = NULL;
  int count = set(&pList);

  if (0 > count)
     /* error */
  else
     /* use *pList */

  ...

  free(pList);

  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was looking for, thanks. –  Grant Nov 3 '12 at 11:55

As far as I understand your question you want to return an array which is allocated in another function : here is the simple version of this

#include<stdio.h>
#include<stdlib.h>
int* set(int *list) {
  int count, i;
  printf("Enter number:\n");
  scanf("%d", &count);
  list = (int *) malloc ( sizeof (int) * count);

  for ( i = 0; i<count;i++ ) {
    list[i] = 123;
  }

  return list;
}

int main ( int argc, char ** argv )
{
  int *list;
  list = set(list);
  //Use whatever you want to do with that array 
  free(list); // don't forget to free
  return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have not checked if malloc fails condition –  Omkant Nov 3 '12 at 12:04

you have an array of integer arrays. Let's look at your set function closely:

for (i = 0; i < count;i++ ) {
    (**list)[count] = 123;
}

As you can see you are treating every array object like an integer value. That should be a nested loop:

for (i to n)
    // allocate each array
    for (k to m)
        // assign value for each value of array
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I didn't see that. But the question is: How to allocade 1-dimensional array and return it using reference? –  Grant Nov 3 '12 at 11:37
    
@Grant by reference do you mean return &array or what? –  user9000 Nov 3 '12 at 11:39
    
By using reference I mean as an output parameter. –  Grant Nov 3 '12 at 11:42
1  
@Grant for (i to n)<br/> (**list)[i] = new int[desired_length_of_each_array]<br/> for (k to m)<br/> (*list)[k] = desired_value<br/> But i assume you are doing this to learn the c syntax. Because it's not a good programming style to use a tripple pointer, since the syntax is very confusing. of the topic: By the way i am new to this forum and i would like to learn how to enter a new line in a comment. –  moller1111 Nov 3 '12 at 11:46

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.