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I have a homework to make an algorithms for sum this sequence : S = 1 - 1/2 + 1/4 - 1/6 + 1/8 - 1/10 + ... + 1/2n if the user input 2 the sum will be 1 - 1/2 = 1/2 and etc.

Here is my coding :

int main() {

    int num, N, k;
    double S;
    cout << "enter the sequence : ";
    cin >> N;
    for (num = 1, k = 0, S = 1; num <=N; num++) {
        num++;
        k=+2;
        if (num % 2 == 0) {
            S -= 1/k;
        } else {
            S += 1/k;
        }
    }
    cout << "The sum is " << S;
    system("PAUSE");
    return 0;
}

I'm so confused why the sum always refer to 1 ?? Can anyone explain to me why this happen??

share|improve this question
for(num = 1, sum = 1; num <=N; num++){
    if(num%2==0){
        sum += 1/(num*2);
    }else{
        sum -= 1/(num*2);
    }
}

That should do it, provided the nth term in your sequence is (1/((n-1)*2)).

EDIT: As pointed out below, when performing division, one of the operands needs to be non integer to prevent the result from being an integer. The correction to my attempt above would be:

for(num = 1, sum = 1; num <=N; num++){
    if(num%2==0){
        sum += 1.0/(num*2);
    }else{
        sum -= 1.0/(num*2);
    }
}

http://codepad.org/KgGAxKxS

share|improve this answer
2  
This still has the integer division problem whenever (num*2) is greater than the numerator (1 in this case) – mathematician1975 Nov 3 '12 at 11:49
    
Which means — always ;-) – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 3 '12 at 11:50
    
@mathematician1975 You're right, added this information. – Asad Saeeduddin Nov 3 '12 at 11:51
1  
Not both sides of the division should be integers, one of them should be a double, thus either num sould be a double (which makes num+2 a double), or the 1 (can be solved by just typing 1.0 which is a double). – leemes Nov 3 '12 at 11:57
1  
BTW, about making things shorter (I think that was one of your objectives, which I find great) — sum += (1.-2*(num%2))/(2*num) instead of if ;-) This is about having fun, not a proper answer, tho ;-) – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 3 '12 at 12:20

In your loop you have this

k=+2;

so you assign the value 2 to k every iteration. You probably want

k+=2;

also take heed of the integer division problem highlighted in the other answer

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, it worked now – jack23 Nov 3 '12 at 11:49

Try 1./k — otherwise integer division of 1 by anything will yield zero. (and see the other answer about =+ vs += typo).

share|improve this answer
    
Don't forget that will yield infinity if k is zero. – Electro Nov 3 '12 at 11:46
    
@Electro, as we already know, k is 2 ;-) – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 3 '12 at 11:47
    
(and when corrected, k is 2 on the first iteration) – Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 3 '12 at 11:47
    
@Electro Yes but his loop code does not allow zero to be a value – mathematician1975 Nov 3 '12 at 11:47
1  
@MichaelKrelin-hacker Actually I think he should accept your answer as integer division is a common pitfall for newbies and your answer likely to be of more use to a future visitor. – mathematician1975 Nov 3 '12 at 12:32

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