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I'm programming a microcontroller in C that has an internal RTC and automatically increments a day counter (0-65536). So, given the initial date adjusted by the user (DD/MM/YYYY), I need to keep the calendar updated based on that counter. That is, I need to know how to calculate the date after x days. Does anyone know an algorithm for that? Couldn't find anything all over the web.

Thanks in advance. Daniel

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Unless it's a project requirement that the RTC should be seeded with month and date as well, I would recommend skipping month and date and seed the RTC with january 1 and the requested year. It will be so much simpler to count then, and you only need to keep track of the year so save a couple of bytes there. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 3 '12 at 12:27
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2 Answers

You could store the current date like this:

int year   = START_YEAR;
int mon    = START_MON;  // month        (1 - 12)
int day    = START_DAY;  // day in month (1 - 31)
int offset = 0;

Then to get the date corresponding to NEW_OFFSET:

void update (int new_offset)
{
    day += new_offset - offset;

    while (day > days_in_month (year, mon)) {
        day -= days_in_month (year, mon);
        mon++;
        if (mon > 12) {
            mon = 1;
            year++;
        }
    }
    offset = new_offset;
}

By saving the offset of the last update you avoid having to start from the initial date.

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Check this. Maybe it need some adjustments. Somewhat brute-force, but speed should be enough even for microcontroller.

#include <stdio.h>

static int days_in_month[] = { 0, 31, 28, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31, 31, 30, 31, 30, 31 };
int day, month, year;

unsigned short day_counter;

int is_leap(int y) {
    return ((y % 4 == 0 && y % 100 != 0) || y % 400 == 0);
}

next_day()
{
    day += 1; day_counter++;
    if (day > days_in_month[month]) {
        day = 1;
        month += 1;
        if (month > 12) {
            month = 1;
            year += 1;
            if (is_leap(year)) {
                days_in_month[2] = 29;
            } else {
                days_in_month[2] = 28;
            }
        }
    }
}

set_date(int d, int m, int y) 
{
    m < 1 ? m = 1 : 0;
    m > 12 ? m = 12 : 0;
    d < 1 ? d = 1 : 0;
    d > days_in_month[m] ? d = days_in_month[m] : 0;
    if (is_leap(y)){
        days_in_month[2] = 29;
    } else {
        days_in_month[2] = 28;
    }
    day = d;
    month = m;
    year = y;
}

skip_days(int x)
{
    int i;
    for (i=0;i<x;i++) next_day();
}

print_date()
{
    printf ("day: %d month: %d year: %d\n", day, month, year);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int i;

    set_date(5, 2, 1980);

    skip_days(10000);
    day_counter = 0;
    /* after this call next_day each day */

    print_date();

    return 0;
}
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It is extremely inefficient to implement skip_days in this way. Better to add the full offset in one step and normalize only once. See my answer. –  Antoine Mathys Nov 4 '12 at 5:35
    
as I understand, skipping will be used only on initial date setting, then each day only next_day() will be executed. about efficiency - 10000 days skipping one million times will take about 1,5 seconds on 16MHz microcontroller. this is not extremely. does your answer includes leap year correction? –  J X Nov 4 '12 at 8:08
    
updated answer for clarification –  J X Nov 4 '12 at 11:04
    
days_in_month() takes a year argument precisely so that it can check for leap years. –  Antoine Mathys Nov 4 '12 at 15:00
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