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I am currently working on a project, having an embedded system sending data to a PC via radio. The packets get a crc16 checksum at the end and it's calculated based on this algorithm:

uint16_t crc16 (const uint8_t * buffer, uint32_t size) {
    uint16_t crc = 0xFFFF;

    if (buffer && size)
        while (size--)
        {
            crc = (crc >> 8) | (crc << 8);
            crc ^= *buffer++;
            crc ^= ((unsigned char) crc) >> 4;
            crc ^= crc << 12;
            crc ^= (crc & 0xFF) << 5;
        }

    return crc;
}

Now I am looking for an equivalent in Java. I already found a good one here: http://introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/51data/CRC16CCITT.java.html

public class CRC16CCITT { 

    public static void main(String[] args) { 
        int crc = 0xFFFF;          // initial value
        int polynomial = 0x1021;   // 0001 0000 0010 0001  (0, 5, 12) 

        // byte[] testBytes = "123456789".getBytes("ASCII");

        byte[] bytes = args[0].getBytes();

        for (byte b : bytes) {
            for (int i = 0; i < 8; i++) {
                boolean bit = ((b   >> (7-i) & 1) == 1);
                boolean c15 = ((crc >> 15    & 1) == 1);
                crc <<= 1;
                if (c15 ^ bit) crc ^= polynomial;
             }
        }

        crc &= 0xffff;
        System.out.println("CRC16-CCITT = " + Integer.toHexString(crc));
    }

}

But this doesnt work with my C Code.

Is anybody able to deliver an adaption or solution for a C and Java equivalent algorithm? Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Why are you setting crc = on every iteration as this is the same as ignoring every value but the last. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 3 '12 at 12:53
    
So what do I have to write then? crc ^= ? I just copied the code from an open source project i ones worked with. –  tellob Nov 3 '12 at 12:56
    
There are much faster ways to compute CRcs than this. Keep searching. There is a table-driven method. –  EJP Nov 3 '12 at 22:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The major difference between java and c in this case is the fact in c you use unsigned numbers and java has only signed numbers. While you can implement the same algorithm with signed numbers, you have to be aware of the fact the sign bit is carried over on shift operations, requiring an extra "and".

This is my implementation:

static int crc16(final byte[] buffer) {
    int crc = 0xFFFF;

    for (int j = 0; j < buffer.length ; j++) {
        crc = ((crc  >>> 8) | (crc  << 8) )& 0xffff;
        crc ^= (buffer[j] & 0xff);//byte to int, trunc sign
        crc ^= ((crc & 0xff) >> 4);
        crc ^= (crc << 12) & 0xffff;
        crc ^= ((crc & 0xFF) << 5) & 0xffff;
    }
    crc &= 0xffff;
    return crc;

}
share|improve this answer
    
Is this the implementation to the c code i posted? –  tellob Nov 3 '12 at 13:04
    
This is the CRC function I use in my code - provided the initial value is the same (0xFFFF) and the polynomial is the same (0x1021) they should give the exact same result. –  thedayofcondor Nov 3 '12 at 13:09
    
The package I get is: 1 20 0 -30 -1 72 -31 -110 64 1 0 2 0 3 0 4 0 5 0 125 -7. 21 Bytes. The packages crc is then -1667. I had to change the order of the last to byte. When I use your algorithm crc delivers me 3377. –  tellob Nov 3 '12 at 13:13
    
the data you should pass to my function is the buffer without the last two bytes. You can change my function to for (int i = 0; i < data.length-2; i++) so the last 2 bytes are not taken into account –  thedayofcondor Nov 3 '12 at 13:23
    
This is how its currently looking like: byte[] bx = new byte[packet.length - 2]; for(int i = 0; i < bx.length; i++) bx[i] = packet[i]; System.out.println(crc16(bx)); –  tellob Nov 3 '12 at 13:26

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