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Let's say I've got three products:

Product A Will deliver 5 power. Costs 50.

Product B Will deliver 9 power. Costs 80.

Product C Will deliver 15 power. Costs 140.

I want to know what combination of products I could buy when I need 7 power. I could buy two of A but one of B is cheaper.

When I'd need 65 power. I would need 4 times C and 1 time A (costs 680). But I could also go for seven B products and one A (costs 610).

I am looking for a way to calculate the possible combinations of products for the given amount of power I need.

The way I tried doing this doesn't give me what I want:

// $products are sorted DESC on their $power
$power = 65
 while( $power > 0 ) {
    foreach( $products as $productPower ) {
        if( ( $productPower > $power && $power - $productPower > 0 ) || $productPower == end( $products ) ) {
            // Add product to list
            $power -= $productPower;
            break;
        }
    }
 }

This sample code will only give me 4 times C and one time A. How should I go about it?

EDIT The number of products is variable. Also, the specific cost and power is variable. So there may be 10 products with cheeper and more expensive price tags.

EDIT 2 As I said above, I want to calculate the possible combinations (plural). Some people seem to have missed that in my description.

share|improve this question
1  
Very interesting question. I'll put my thought into it. –  Second Rikudo Nov 3 '12 at 16:44
2  
Just to be clear, do you want all possible combinations? Or only the cheaper one? –  Second Rikudo Nov 3 '12 at 16:46
9  
It seems you've run into a variation of the Knapsack Problem. The good news is, there's a lot of various algorithms to help you with. The bad news is that you won't be able to do it quickly. This is a category of problems where you'll need to compare every solution to every other solution (known as combinatorial optimization). –  SomeKittens Nov 3 '12 at 16:47
    
Do you know a maximum power you will ever need to provide? –  walrii Nov 3 '12 at 17:07
1  
If I get the question correctly, you want all feasible combinations, i.e. all integer combinations of products that yield at least the minimum required power. Do you have a limit on your budget? Otherwise, there is an infinite number of solutions. Or do you expect only all solutions that satisfy the constraint, and cannot be "reduced", i.e. removing any unit would make it unfeasible? –  Mathias Nov 9 '12 at 21:32

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted
+50

Introduction

This would have been a Knapsack problem but because you are not not just looking for the optimal solution you also want to find all possible combination

Then you can solve this Subset sum problem + Coin Change to get :

  • List all possible Combination and not just total combination
  • Get Best Combination

    For example, for N = 4,S = {1,2,3}, there are four solutions: {1,1,1,1},{1,1,2},{2,2},{1,3}.

Example 1

echo "<pre>";
$start = microtime(true);

// Start Finder
$finder = new CombinationFinder(65);

// Add Produts
$finder->addProduct(new Product("A", 5, 50));
$finder->addProduct(new Product("B", 9, 80));
$finder->addProduct(new Product("C", 15, 140));

// Output All Found Combinations
foreach ( $finder as $key => $sales ) {
    echo $sales->getName(), "\t\t\t", $sales->getCombinationCost(), PHP_EOL;
}

// Get Best Combination
echo "Combination: ", $finder->getBestCombination()->getName(), PHP_EOL;
echo "Cost: ", number_format($finder->getBestCombination()->getCombinationCost(), 2), PHP_EOL;

// Total Time
echo PHP_EOL, microtime(true) - $start;

Output

Top Combinations

["A",1],["C",4]                 610
["A",1],["B",5],["C",1]         590
["A",4],["C",3]                 620
["A",4],["B",5]                 600
["A",7],["C",2]                 630
["A",10],["C",1]                640
["A",13]                        650

Best Combination

Combination: ["A",1],["B",5],["C",1]
Cost: 590.00

Total Time

0.2533269405365

Best Combination

You can see the best Combination is A*1 ,B*5 ,C*1 .. Break down

            A          B           C
Power : 5   *  1 +  9  *  5 +  15  *  1    =   65
Cost  : 50  *  1 +  80 *  5 +  140 *  1    =   590   <---- Better than 610.00   

Example 2

The class can be use for 2, 3 , 4 or more product combination and yet sill very fast

echo "<pre>";
$start = microtime(true);

// Start Finder
$finder = new CombinationFinder(65);

// Add Produts
$finder->addProduct(new Product("A", 5, 50));
$finder->addProduct(new Product("B", 9, 80));
$finder->addProduct(new Product("C", 15, 140));
$finder->addProduct(new Product("D", 20, 120)); // more product class

$finder->run(); // just run

// Get Best Combination
echo "Combination: ", $finder->getBestCombination()->getName(), PHP_EOL;
echo "Cost: ", number_format($finder->getBestCombination()->getCombinationCost(), 2), PHP_EOL;

// Total Time
echo PHP_EOL, microtime(true) - $start;

Output

Combination: ["A",1],["D",3]    //<---------------------- Best Combination
Cost: 410.00

Time Taken

1.1627659797668  // less than 2 sec 

Class Used

class Product {
    public $name;
    public $power;
    public $cost;
    public $unit;

    function __construct($name, $power, $cost) {
        $this->name = $name;
        $this->power = $power;
        $this->cost = $cost;
        $this->unit = floor($cost / $power);
    }
}



class Sales {
    /**
     *
     * @var Product
     */
    public $product;
    public $count;
    public $salePower;
    public $saleCost;

    function __construct(Product $product, $count) {
        $this->product = $product;
        $this->count = $count;
        $this->salePower = $product->power * $count;
        $this->saleCost = $product->cost * $count;
    }
}



class SalesCombination {
    private $combinationPower;
    private $combinationCost;
    private $combinationName;
    private $combinationItems;
    private $args;

    function __construct(array $args) {
        list($this->combinationPower, $this->combinationCost, $this->combinationItems) = array_reduce($args, function ($a, $b) {
            $a[0] += $b->salePower;
            $a[1] += $b->saleCost;
            $a[2] = array_merge($a[2], array_fill(0, $b->count, $b->product->name));
            return $a;
        }, array(0,0,array()));
        $this->args = $args;
    }

    function getName() {
        $values = array_count_values($this->combinationItems);
        $final = array();
        foreach ( $values as $name => $amount ) {
            $final[] = array($name,$amount);
        }
        return substr(json_encode($final), 1, -1);
    }

    function getCombinationPower() {
        return $this->combinationPower;
    }

    function getCombinationCost() {
        return $this->combinationCost;
    }
}




class CombinationFinder implements IteratorAggregate, Countable {
    private $sales;
    private $products = array();
    private $power;
    private $found = array();
    private $bestCombination = null;
    private $run = false;

    function __construct($power) {
        $this->power = $power;
    }

    function addProduct(Product $product) {
        $this->products[] = $product;
    }

    function getBestCombination() {
        return $this->bestCombination;
    }

    function getFound() {
        return $this->found ?  : array();
    }

    public function getIterator() {
        if ($this->run === false) {
            $this->run();
        }
        return new ArrayIterator($this->found);
    }

    public function count() {
        return count($this->found);
    }

    function run() {
        $this->run = true;
        $this->buildSales();
        $u = new UniqueCombination($this->sales);
        $u->setCallback(array($this,"find"));
        $u->expand();
    }

    function find() {
        $salesCombination = new SalesCombination(func_get_args());
        if ($salesCombination->getCombinationPower() == $this->power) {
            isset($this->bestCombination) or $this->bestCombination = $salesCombination;
            $salesCombination->getCombinationCost() < $this->bestCombination->getCombinationCost() and $this->bestCombination = $salesCombination;
            $this->found[sha1($salesCombination->getName())] = $salesCombination;
        }
    }

    function buildSales() {
        $total = count($this->products);
        foreach ( $this->products as $product ) {
            $max = floor($this->power / $product->power);
            for($i = 1; $i <= $max; $i ++) {
                $this->sales[$product->name][] = new Sales($product, $i);
            }
        }
    }
}

class UniqueCombination {
    private $items;
    private $result = array();
    private $callback = null;

    function __construct($items) {
        $this->items = array_values($items);
    }

    function getResult() {
        return $this->result;
    }

    function setCallback($callback) {
        $this->callback = $callback;
    }

    function expand($set = array(), $index = 0) {
        if ($index == count($this->items)) {
            if (! empty($set)) {
                $this->result[] = $set;
                if (is_callable($this->callback)) {
                    call_user_func_array($this->callback, $set);
                }
            }
            return;
        }
        $this->expand($set, $index + 1);
        foreach ( $this->items[$index] as $item ) {
            $this->expand(array_merge($set, array($item)), $index + 1);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
6  
Babas answer, as always been.... elegant. +1. –  itachi Nov 11 '12 at 11:52
    
thanks for the complement .. i really appreciate –  Baba Nov 11 '12 at 11:55
1  
Clear, clever and well documented. You deserve the +50. Thank you very much for helping me solve this problem. –  Bob Kruithof Nov 14 '12 at 14:26
    
You are welcome anytime –  Baba Nov 14 '12 at 14:33

Updated answer

I stand with my original answer, but have since derived an explicit solution. Unfortunately, I am not versed in PHP, so the implementation I'll present is in (poorly written) F#.

The point which makes your question interesting is that you are not looking for THE best solution, but for all feasible solutions. As I pointed out in my original answer, this is tricky, because the set of feasible solutions is infinite. As an illustration, if you want to produce 65 units, you can use 13xA, which yields a power of 5x13 = 65. But then, obviously, any solution which contains more than 13 units of A will also be a solution.

You can't return an infinite set from a function. What you need here is the set of all "boundary" cases:

  • if a solution contains as many units as a boundary case for all products, it is valid
  • if a unit can be removed from a boundary case and it is still feasible, it is not feasible anymore.

For instance, the solution S = { A = 13; B = 0; C = 0 } is a boundary case. Remove one unit from any product, and it is not feasible - and if a combination is such that for every product, it contains more units than S, it is a valid solution, but "dominated" by S.

In other words, we cannot return all possible solutions, but we can return the "limit" that separates feasible and unfeasible solutions.

Note also that the cost of the Products is irrelevant here - once you have the set of boundary cases, computing the cost of a solution is trivial.

Given that you specify that the number of products could be arbitrary, this sounds like a clear case for recursion.

If you have no product, the solution is trivially empty - there is no solution. If you have 1 product, the solution is ceiling (target / product.Power) If you have 2 products, say A:5 and B:2, with a target of 10, you could

  • use 0 of A -> remaining target is 10, use 5 B (or more)
  • use 1 of A -> remaining target is 10 - 5, use 3 B (or more)
  • use 2 of A -> remaining target is 10 - 10, use 0 B (or more)

A is maxed out, so we are done.

Note that I sorted A and B by decreasing Power. An unsorted list would work, too, but you would produced "useless" boundary points. For instance, we would get [1 B; 2 A], and [2 B; 2 A].

The idea can be extended to a full recursion, along the lines of

Given a list of Products and a remaining Target power to achieve,
If the Product is the last one in the list, use ceiling of Target/product Power,
Else take every possible combination of the head product from 0 to max, and
Search deeper, decreasing Target Power by the units supplied by the Product selected.

Below is a simple F# implementation, which could easily be improved upon, and will hopefully convey the idea. The units function returns the minimum number of units of a product with Power value required to supply target Power, and the recursive function solve builds up the combinations into a List of solutions, tuples with a Product Id and the number of units to use:

type Product = { Id: string; Power: int }
let A = { Id = "A"; Power = 5 }
let B = { Id = "B"; Power = 9 }
let C = { Id = "C"; Power = 15 }

let products = [ A; B; C ] |> List.sortBy(fun e -> - e.Power)

let units (target: int) (value: int) =
    if target < 0
    then 0
    else
        (float)target / (float)value |> ceil |> (int)

let rec solve (products: Product list) 
              (current: (string * int) list) 
              (solutions: (string * int) list list) 
              (target: int) =
    match products with
    | [ ] -> [ ]
    | [ one ] -> ((one.Id, (units target one.Power)) :: current) :: solutions
    | hd :: tl ->
        let max = units target hd.Power
        [ 0 .. max ]
        |> List.fold (fun s u ->
            solve tl ((hd.Id, u) :: current) s (target - u * hd.Power)) solutions

I would run it this way:

> solve [B;A] [] [] 65;;
Real: 00:00:00.001, CPU: 00:00:00.000, GC gen0: 0, gen1: 0, gen2: 0
val it : (string * int) list list =
  [[("A", 0); ("B", 8)]; [("A", 1); ("B", 7)]; [("A", 3); ("B", 6)];
   [("A", 4); ("B", 5)]; [("A", 6); ("B", 4)]; [("A", 8); ("B", 3)];
   [("A", 10); ("B", 2)]; [("A", 12); ("B", 1)]; [("A", 13); ("B", 0)]]

Note that the number of solutions will increase pretty fast. I ran your example, which yielded 28 solutions. As the number of products and the target power increases, the number of boundary solutions will expand quite a bit.

I can't code in PHP at all, but I assume it supports recursion - maybe someone will show a recursive solution in PHP? In any case, I hope this helps.

An interesting side question would be how different the problem would be, if the products could be purchased in non-integer quantities. In that case, the boundary would really be a surface (a polyhedron I believe); how to describe it adequately would be an interesting problem!

Original answer

Unless I am misunderstanding your question, what you describe is what is known in optimization as an Integer Linear Programming problem, with well established algorithms to resolve them. Your problem sounds like a variation of the Diet problem (given ingredients, find the cheapest way to get enough calories to survive), one of the archetypes of Linear Programming, with integer variable constraints.

First, the solution to your problem as stated has an infinite numbers of solutions; suppose that 5 x A is a solution to your problem, then any combination with more than 5 units of A will also satisfy your requirements.

Edit: I realize I might have misunderstood your problem - I assumed you could buy any quantity of each product. If you can buy only 1 unit of each, this is an easier problem: it is still an integer programming problem, but a simpler one, the Knapsack problem.

Note also that if you can by non-integer quantities of the products (doesn't seem to be the case for you), your problem is significantly easier to solve.

The most obvious way to restate your problem, which make it a standard optimization problem that can be solved fairly easily:

Find the combination of n Products which has the minimum total cost, subject to constraint that the total energy delivered is above desired threshold. (I assume that both the total cost and total energy delivered are linear functions of the quantity of A, B, C... purchased).

I assume this is actually what you really want - the best possible solution to your problem. If you are really interested in enumerating all the solution, one way to go about it is to identify the boundaries which define the feasible set (i.e. the geometric boundary such that if you are on one side you know it's not a solution, otherwise it is). This is much easier if you are working with numbers that don't have to be integers.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was going to say. More or less. –  eh9 Nov 8 '12 at 21:32

A simple observation on this specific problem may help people in solving this question. The way the power and costs are distributed here. You get the most value for your money with Product B. In fact, the only time you would ever use Product C, is when you need exactly 15 power, or 28-30 power.

So for any power needed above 30, just use integer division to get the # of Product B's you need by:

int num_productB = power_needed/9;

Then find out how much more power you need by:

int leftover = power_needed % 9;

If the leftover is greater than 5, just add one more Product B, Else use 1 Product A:

if(leftover > 5)
     num_productB++;
else
     productA = 1;

The full function would look something like this:

function computeBestCombination($power_needed){
$power_results = array();
//index 0 = Product A
//index 1 = Product B
//index 2 = Product C
if($power_needed == 15){
    $power_results[0] = 0;
    $power_results[1] = 0;
    $power_results[2] = 1;
}
else if($power_needed >= 28 && $power_needed <= 30)
    $power_results[0] = 0;
    $power_results[1] = 0;
    $power_results[2] = 2;
else{
    $power_results[1] = $power_needed / 9;
    $left_over = $power_needed % 9;
    if($left_over > 5){
        $power_results[1]++;
    }
    else{
        $power_results[0] = 1;
    }
    $power_results[2] = 0;
}
return $power_results;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Provided that only B will always be cheeper than any other product, yes. Something I should have stated in hindsight is that there is a variable amount of products with different specifications. –  Bob Kruithof Nov 3 '12 at 19:06

Check this code:

<?php
$products = array(5 => 50, 9 => 80, 15 => 140);

$power = 65;
$output = array();

function calculate_best_relation($products, $power, &$output) {
  $aux = array_keys($products);
  sort($aux);

  $min = $aux[0];
  if ($power <= $min) {
    $output[] = $min;
    return $output;
  }
  else {
    //Calculate best relation
    $relations = array();
    foreach ($products as $p => $c) {
      $relations[$p] = $c / $p;
    }
    asort($relations);

    foreach($relations as $p => $c) {
      if ($power > $c) {
        $output[] = $p;
        $power -= $c;
        calculate_best_relation($products, $power, $output);
        break;
      }
    }
  }
}

calculate_best_relation($products, $power, $output);

print_r($output);
?>

This will print:

Array ( [0] => 9 [1] => 9 [2] => 9 [3] => 9 [4] => 9 [5] => 9 [6] => 9 [7] => 5 )

Which is the correct solution.

P.D: Surely you can optimize the function.

share|improve this answer
2  
As I have stated in my question, I want to know the possible combinations. There is always a possibility that one might want to spend more than the cheapest solution. –  Bob Kruithof Nov 3 '12 at 19:09

An integer programming package such as pulp will make this easy as pie.

Here is a beautiful example that will guide you through the process.

Install python and then easy_install pulp and this will work.

The code should be easy to read and follow too.

__author__ = 'Robert'
import pulp

def get_lp_problem(products, required_power):
    prob = pulp.LpProblem("MyProblem", pulp.LpMinimize)
    total_cost = []
    total_power = []
    for product in products:
        var = pulp.LpVariable(product.name,
            lowBound=0,
            upBound=None,
            cat=pulp.LpInteger)
        total_cost.append(var * product.cost)
        total_power.append(var * product.power)

    prob += sum(total_power) >= required_power #ensure we have required power
    prob += sum(total_cost) #minimize total cost!
    return prob

def solve(products, required_power):
    lp_prob = get_lp_problem(products, required_power)
    lp_prob.solve()
    print lp_prob.solutionTime #0.01 seconds
    for var in lp_prob.variables():
        print var.name, var.varValue


from collections import namedtuple
Product = namedtuple("Product", "name, power, cost")
products = [
    Product('A', 5, 50),
    Product('B', 9, 80),
    Product('C', 15, 140)
]
solve(products, 7)
"""
A 0.0
B 1.0
C 0.0

cost = 0*50 + 1*80 + 0*140 = 80
power = 0*5 + 1*9 + 0*15 = 9
"""

solve(products, 65)
"""
A 1.0
B 5.0
C 1.0

cost = 1*50 + 5*80 + 1*140 = 590
power = 1*5 + 5*9 + 1*15 = 65
"""

more products:

products = [Product(i, i, i-i/100) for i in range(1000)]
solve(products, 12345)
"""
solution time: 0.0922736688601
1 45.0
100 123.0
power = 123*100 + 45*1 =12345  
"""
share|improve this answer
1  
This looks right, with one caveat. The problem is in general a linear integer programming problem, but what is unclear on the statement is whether Bob wants the optimal solution, or the entire feasible set. Your solution is the best possible one, but from the problem statement, it looks as if what is requested is all solutions that are feasible. –  Mathias Nov 9 '12 at 20:24

This is pretty nicely solved using dynamic programming. The trick is in finding the mathematical relationship between increasingly large values and previous, smaller values.

So let C(p) be the cost for p power. Then we know the following from your base cases:

Let's say I've got three products:

Product A Will deliver 5 power. Costs 50.

Product B Will deliver 9 power. Costs 80.

Product C Will deliver 15 power. Costs 140.

C(5) = 50
C(9) = 80
C(15) = 140

You can define the base cases however you want. Presumably C(0) = 0, but that is not given.

Then the trick is to find the recursion to solve this. Using the given values, we get

C(p) = Min(C(p-5) + 50, C(p-9) + 80, C(p-15) + 140)

More generally, you have to iterate over each of the base cases and see which way is cheaper.

So now you're left with two ways to build your solution: recursively or using dynamic programming. The former is easier given the recursive function, but is obviously quite inefficient. The other way to do this, then, is to start at the bottom and build your solution iteratively.

Lets say you want to find the cost for p power. Then the following pseudocode will work:

// Create an array big enough to hold elements 0 through p inclusive.
var solution = new Array(p+1);

// Initialize the array with the base cases.
for each base case b:
  solution[power(b)] = cost(b);

// Now we build the array moving forward
for i from 0 to p:
  // Start with a really big number
  solution[i] = +Infinity;

  // Iterate over base case to see what the cheapest way to get i power is.
  for each base case b:
    solution[i] = min(solution[i], solution[i - power(b)] + cost(b);

// The final answer is the last element in the array, but you get everything
// else for free. You can even work backwards and figure out the cheapest
// combination!
return solution[p]

Analysis left as an exercise to the reader :-)

share|improve this answer

You want to optimize the following function

$cost = $amountOfProductA * $costOfProductA + $amountOfProductB * $costOfProductB + $amountOfProductC * $costOfProductC

With the following restriction

$powerDeliveredByA * $amountOfProductA + $powerDeliveredByB * $amountOfProductB + $powerDeliveredByC * $amountOfProductC = 65

So these lines find solutions that yield 65 (or close to 65, using an acceptable threshold you'd have to set), then sort the solutions array by the cost, and get the first element of the solutions array:

$requiredPower = 65;
$productA = array('amount' => 0, 'cost' => 50, 'powerDelivered' => 5);
$productB = array('amount' => 0, 'cost' => 80, 'powerDelivered' => 9);
$productC = array('amount' => 0, 'cost' => 140, 'powerDelivered' => 15);
$increment = 0.01;
$threshold = 0.01;
$solutions = array();
while($productA['amount'] * $productA['powerDelivered'] < $requiredPower)
{
    $productC['amount'] = 0;
    while($productB['amount'] * $productB['powerDelivered'] < $requiredPower)
    {
        $productC['amount'] = 0;
        while($productC['amount'] * $productC['powerDelivered'] < $requiredPower)
        {
            if($productA['amount'] * $productA['powerDelivered'] + $productB['amount'] * $productB['powerDelivered'] + $productC['amount'] * $productC['powerDelivered'] > $requiredPower + $threshold)
            {
                break;
            }
            if(isWithinThreshold($productA['powerDelivered'] * $productA['amount'] + $productB['powerDelivered'] * $productB['amount'] + $productC['powerDelivered'] * $productC['amount'], $requiredPower, $threshold))
            {
                //var_dump($productA['powerDelivered'] * $productA['amount'] + $productB['powerDelivered'] * $productB['amount'] + $productC['powerDelivered'] * $productC['amount']);
                $cost = $productA['amount'] * $productA['cost'] + $productB['amount'] * $productB['cost'] + $productC['amount'] * $productC['cost'];
                $solutions[number_format($cost,10,'.','')] = array('cost' => $cost, 'qA' => $productA['amount'], 'qB' => $productB['amount'], 'qC' => $productC['amount']);
            }
            $productC['amount'] = $productC['amount'] + $increment;
        }
        $productB['amount'] = $productB['amount'] + $increment;
    }
    $productA['amount'] = $productA['amount'] + $increment;
}
ksort($solutions, SORT_NUMERIC);
$minimumCost = array_shift($solutions);
var_dump($minimumCost);

//checks if $value1 is within $value2 +- $threshold
function isWithinThreshold($value1, $value2, $threshold)
{
    if($value1 >= $value2 - $threshold && $value1 <= $value2 + $threshold)
    {
        return true;
    }
}

The way to optimize a function is described here: Function Optimization

share|improve this answer
6  
This doesn't actually answer the question. –  SomeKittens Nov 3 '12 at 16:46
    
The optimization is easy in that case. 0, 0, 0. You don't take the $requiredPower here into account. –  Second Rikudo Nov 3 '12 at 16:55
1  
That link doesn't offer any help for discretized solutions other than saying they are harder. –  walrii Nov 3 '12 at 17:05
    
@SomeKittens I believe it does. –  Diego Saa Nov 3 '12 at 23:07
    
@madara-uchiha The edited answer doesn't have these problems. –  Diego Saa Nov 3 '12 at 23:09

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