Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I would like to know if in general it is possible to create a C++ DLL with Visual C++ 2010 starting from C code and the header files I find in a Linux distribution.

Theoretically, if I take a piece of C code (that includes different header files) from Linux and I find in the Linux file system all the header files needed for the linkage of the project, will I be able to successfully compile the project in Windows with Visual C++ 2010?

Are there some examples or a tutorial for doing this?

After compiling a DLL, I would like to use it in a C# application, which I will run under Linux with Mono.

share|improve this question
    
If the source includes the whole Linux kernel as well, then... Then still not, because MSVC doesn't respect the standards, so portable C is not portable to Windows. –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 16:45
    
@H2CO3: even if MSVC respected the standarts, simply compiling the kernel into your application won't make it work. Unless you make a system replacing driver, of course :) –  Dani Nov 3 '12 at 16:49
    
@Dani Yes, of course I meant that if the necessary parts (incl. the system services, syscalls, etc.) could be compiled along with the program, that could, in theory, work. But see, it's far from realistic. –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 16:51

1 Answer 1

No, it might not be possible purely with header files.
The problem is some functions (usually most) are defined in object files and shared libraries, and not in header files so without object files and shared libraries you cannot compile them.
Object files and shared libraries are not cross-platform so you cannot copy them.
The only solution is use a system like Cygwin, which has linux headers and object files/dlls compiled for Windows.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.