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I have script for ssh login without expect:

function do_auth_connect(){
    if [ -n "$SSH_ASKPASS_TMPFILE" ]; then
        cat "$SSH_ASKPASS_TMPFILE"
        exit 0
    elif [ $# -lt 1 ]; then
        echo "Usage: echo password | $0 <ssh command line options>" >&2
        exit 1
    fi

    sighandler() {
        rm "$TMP_PWD"
    }

    TMP_PWD=$(mktemp)
    chmod 600 "$TMP_PWD"
    trap 'sighandler' SIGHUP SIGINT SIGQUIT SIGABRT SIGKILL SIGALRM SIGTERM

    export SSH_ASKPASS=$0
    export SSH_ASKPASS_TMPFILE=$TMP_PWD

    [ "$DISPLAY" ] || export DISPLAY=dummydisplay:0
    read password
    echo $password >> "$TMP_PWD"

    # use setsid to detach from tty
    #exec setsid "$@"
    setsid "$@"

    rm "$TMP_PWD"
}

If I use command like:

echo "my_password" | do_auth_connect ssh use@domain "uname -a"

all work fine. But if I use:

read password
echo "$password" | do_auth_connect ssh use@domain "uname -a"

script freezes.

"set -x" shows that the script goes into a loop, and wait another "read" param.

How I can fix this? Thanks

---UPD--- (for @Barmar)

set -x output when ok (with scp example):

+ echo 'user_password'
+ do_auth_connect scp -P 444 user@domain:/home/user/dbg.log /home/user/dbg.log
+ '[' -n '' ']'
+ '[' 5 -lt 1 ']'
++ mktemp
+ TMP_PWD=/tmp/tmp.X8TKTIchq6
+ chmod 600 /tmp/tmp.X8TKTIchq6
+ trap sighandler SIGHUP SIGINT SIGQUIT SIGABRT SIGKILL SIGALRM SIGTERM
+ export SSH_ASKPASS=./1.sh
+ SSH_ASKPASS=./1.sh
+ export SSH_ASKPASS_TMPFILE=/tmp/tmp.X8TKTIchq6
+ SSH_ASKPASS_TMPFILE=/tmp/tmp.X8TKTIchq6
+ '[' :0.0 ']'
+ read password
+ echo 'user_password'
+ setsid scp -P 444 user@domain:/home/user/dbg.log /home/user/dbg.log
+ echo 'user_password'
+ do_auth_connect scp -P 444 user@domain:/home/user/dbg.log /home/user/dbg.log
+ '[' -n /tmp/tmp.X8TKTIchq6 ']'
+ cat /tmp/tmp.X8TKTIchq6
+ exit 0
+ rm /tmp/tmp.X8TKTIchq6
+ exit

and when fails:

+ read pass
> user_password
+ echo 'user_password'
+ do_auth_connect scp -P 444 user@domain:/home/user/dbg.log /home/user/dbg.log
+ '[' -n '' ']'
+ '[' 5 -lt 1 ']'
++ mktemp
+ TMP_PWD=/tmp/tmp.7usdmtHgqt
+ chmod 600 /tmp/tmp.7usdmtHgqt
+ trap sighandler SIGHUP SIGINT SIGQUIT SIGABRT SIGKILL SIGALRM SIGTERM
+ export SSH_ASKPASS=./1.sh
+ SSH_ASKPASS=./1.sh
+ export SSH_ASKPASS_TMPFILE=/tmp/tmp.7usdmtHgqt
+ SSH_ASKPASS_TMPFILE=/tmp/tmp.7usdmtHgqt
+ '[' :0.0 ']'
+ read password
+ echo 'user_password'
+ setsid scp -P 444 user@domain:/home/user/dbg.log /home/user/dbg.log
+ read -p '> ' pass

and this is all, ^C does not work :)

---UPD2---

I found out that any "read" breaks the script For example:

read null
echo "user_password" | do_auth_connect scp -P 444 user@domain:/home/user/dbg.log ~/dbg.log

have some troubles with freezes

share|improve this question
    
I can't think of anything -- can you add the output from set -x to the question? – Barmar Nov 3 '12 at 17:14
1  
Why aren't you using public key authentication and a keychain app instead of entering passwords by hand? – Barmar Nov 3 '12 at 17:16
1  
Did you put read pass at the beginning of this script? You put $0 in SSH_ASKPASS, so scp is running the script again, and it prompts for the password again. – Barmar Nov 3 '12 at 19:07
1  
When you do SSH_ASKPASS=$0 it means "In order to get the password, run this script again". If the script does read pass at the beginning, it will do it again. You need to make it conditional on whether the password has already been saved in the temp file. – Barmar Nov 3 '12 at 20:40
1  
@Barmar your explanation put everything in its place :) thank you very much! – Spirit of Stallman Nov 3 '12 at 20:49
SSH_ASKPASS           If ssh needs a passphrase, it will read the passphrase from
                       the current terminal if it was run from a terminal.  If ssh
                       does not have a terminal associated with it but DISPLAY and
                       SSH_ASKPASS are set, it will execute the program specified by
                       SSH_ASKPASS and open an X11 window to read the passphrase.
                       This is particularly useful when calling ssh from a .xsession
                       or related script.  (Note that on some machines it may be
                       necessary to redirect the input from /dev/null to make this
                       work.)

Related to:

(Note that on some machines it may be necessary to redirect the input from /dev/null to make this work.)

This is very vague, try to redirect input to /dev/null as advised just prior to issuing the ssh command

share|improve this answer

Came to this looking for a similar situation: ssh invokes a remote script that contains a setsid call, and observing the ssh never terminates.

ssh remotehost start-daemon.sh

where start-daemon.sh

#!/bin/bash
...
setsid $daemon $args &
exit 0

The ssh will hang, and must be given ^C to stop. The fix (as hinted in http://serverfault.com/questions/364689 comments) is to redirect setsid's stdout:

setsid $daemon $args > /dev/null &

Then ssh stops as expected. In my tests stderr did not need the same treatment.

share|improve this answer

Since feature requests to mark a comment as an answer remain declined, I copy the above solution here.

When you do SSH_ASKPASS=$0 it means "In order to get the password, run this script again". If the script does read pass at the beginning, it will do it again. You need to make it conditional on whether the password has already been saved in the temp file. – Barmar

share|improve this answer
3  
Instead of continually adding these types of answers, why not comment to the user (in this case Barmar) and ask them to post an answer. – bluefeet Nov 19 '13 at 13:47
    
1. Where the user has decided not to post his solution as an answer, why should he change his mind if asked to? 2. Asking him would involve remembering having asked until some time, then revisiting this page and checking whether he posted an answer; such procedure would be far more laborious than adding this type of answer, and if he didn't, we gained nothing. – Armali Nov 19 '13 at 14:30
1  
@Armali, if you have the time to convert comments to answers, you should at least spare some more time to beautify the answer, format code, add explanations, remove signatures, etc. Oh, and remove the useless references to the declined feature. Concatenating a few comments does not make an answer. – ypercubeᵀᴹ Nov 19 '13 at 14:42
    
Thank you for your suggestions, but, if you have the time to make them, you might do all this yourself. And even as it is, when anyone looks for an answer to the question, he will find it more easily (or find it at all) if it is placed in the section Answers, regardless of any pretty-printing. – Armali Nov 20 '13 at 7:16

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