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I'm having a problem with what should be incredibly simple code. I want to take in an integer between 1 and 3 with error checking. It works fine for checking for numbers that are too large or too small, but when a alpha/number combination is entered, it gets stuck in an infinite loop. Suggestions?

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argc, char *argv[]){
    int input;

    cout << "\nPlease enter a number from 1 to 3:" << endl;
    cout << "-> ";
    cin >> input;

    while(input< 1 || input> 3){
        cout << "\n---------------------------------------" << endl;
        cout << "\n[!] The number you entered was invalid." << endl;
        cout << "\nPlease re-enter a number from 1 to 3" << endl;
        cout << "-> ";
        cin >> input;
    }

    cout << "You chose " << input << endl;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that:

cin >> input;

Will cause the bad bit to be set when you try and read a non numeric value. After that happens any attempt to use the operator>> is silently ignored.

So the way to correct for this is to test if the stream is in a good state and if not then reset the state flags and try and read again. But note that the bad input (that caused the problem) is still on the input so you need to make sure you throw it away as well.

if (cin >> input)
{
    // It worked (input is now in a good state)
}
else
{
    // input is in a bad state.
    // So first clear the state.
    cin.clear();

    // Now you must get rid of the bad input.
    // Personally I would just ignore the rest of the line
    std::ignore(std::numeric_limits<std::streamsize>::max(), '\n');

    // now that you have reset the stream you can go back and try and read again.
}

To prevent it getting stuck (which is caused by the bad bit being set) read into a string then use a string stream to parse user input. I also prefer this method (for user interactive input) as it allows for easier combination of different styles of reading (ie combining operator>> and std::getline() as you can use these on the stringstream).

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
// using namespace std;
// Try to stop using this.
// For anything other than a toy program it becomes a problem.

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int          input;

    std::string  line;
    while(std::getline(std::cin, line))   // read a line at a time for parsing.
    {
        std::stringstream linestream(line);
        if (!linestream >> input)
        {
             // input was not a number
             // Error message and try again
             continue;
        }
        if ((input < 1) || (input > 3))
        {
             // Error out of range
             // Message and try again
             continue;
        }
        char errorTest;
        if (linestream >> errorTest)
        {
             // There was extra stuff on the same line.
             // ie sobody typed 2x<enter>
             // Error Message;
             continue;
        }

        // it worked perfectly.
        // The value is now in input.
        // So break out of the loop. 
        break;
    }
}
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ctest.cpp: In function 'int main(int, char**)': ctest.cpp:14:42: error: variable 'std::stringstream linestream' has initializer but incomplete type –  tuergeist Nov 3 '12 at 18:39
    
@tuergeist: Fixed. But you could have fixed it for me. –  Loki Astari Nov 3 '12 at 18:42
    
using namespace is always ok in a cpp (especially in this case). It's inside a header that it will surely give you a headache. To avoid any collision though, I prefer to explicitly call what I will be using with using theNameSpace::TheThingIneed; and only inside cpp. Always be fully explicit inside a header file. –  Emileb Feb 13 '14 at 1:55
    
@emileb: I would disagree. Read: Why is “using namespace std;” considered bad practice? The using construct is a problem in most situations and leads to the introduction of bugs when you maintain the code that are hard to spot and diagnose. –  Loki Astari Feb 13 '14 at 19:14
    
@LokiAstari I'm aware of the possible problems that this may lead to, but these problems are limited to the inside of a cpp source file if you keep the "using" stuff outside of any header file. Still, this may lead to problems, but in the code of the OP, it would be useless to be fully explicit. –  Emileb Feb 14 '14 at 21:50
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int validatedInput(int min = 1, int max = 3)
{
    while(true)
    {
        cout << "Enter a number: ";
        string s;
        getline(cin,s);
        char *endp = 0;
        int ret = strtol(s.c_str(),&endp,10);
        if(endp!=s.c_str() && !*endp && ret >= min && ret <= max)
            return ret;
        cout << "Invalid input. Allowed range: " << min << "-" << max <<endl;
    }
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int val = validatedInput();
    cout << "You entered " << val <<endl;
    return 0;
}
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you forgot to #include <stdlib.h> for strtol –  tuergeist Nov 3 '12 at 18:38
    
hmm runs for me even without inclusion. but i think that might be the least of his problems ;-) –  pokey909 Nov 3 '12 at 18:39
    
strtol - newer compiler would tell you this. –  tuergeist Nov 3 '12 at 18:40

You declared input as int but when you write an alphanumeric character to input it will try to implicitly convert it into integer. But you error checking does not account for this.

Ur problem can be easily solved by changing your while loop. instead of checking this how about you check

while(input!=1 || input!=2 || input!=3)
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Unfortunately not. The stream is in a bad state. You need to reset the state flags before retrying the read. –  Loki Astari Nov 3 '12 at 18:30

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