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This is my first C homework, so my error might be something really obvious to you, and I apologize in advance if that's the case. However, this seemed quite unusual to me (not just working, but having some weird output), so I thought I should probably ask around. I'm trying to calculate the sum of the alternating harmonic series. This is the function that's supposed to do it (it returns a double).

    double series(void){

    double sum = 0.0;
    int i,x;

    for (i = 1; i > 0 ; i = i+1)
    {

            if (sum - (sum - 1.0/x) == 0 || sum - (sum + 1.0/x) == 0)
            {
                    printf("To infinity and beyond... almost!\n");
                    return sum;
            }
            else if (i % 2 != 0)
            {
                    sum = sum - 1.0/x;
            }
            else if (i % 2 == 0)
            {
                    sum = sum + 1.0/x;
            }
            else
            {
            printf("How did I end up here?\n");
            }

    }

    printf("I ESCAPED THE LOOP\n");
    return 1.0*i;

}

And when I run the program, it always ends up in the last few lines (prints the line I ESCAPED THE LOOP, so the for loop ends, while it's supposed to run until the first if condition is met. Last line isn't meant to be reached). And the output -- the return value of the function -- is -21473822648.000000 for i. A negative number (actually the output in main is positive, but it's multiplied by minus one in there and removing the -1.0 does nothing more than change the sign to the one it shouldn't be), when the only things that change i should be i=1 and ++i in the for loop introduction . How does that happen? The only things that main does is call for the function, set a double's value as the negative of the return value of the function and prints that value.

And I just realized that the order of operations in the if() statement might be wrong, but I fixed it with extra parentheses around everything. It had no effect.

Oh, and this is actually not the whole problem, I'm actually supposed to find out which are the best and worst orders of summation. I just wanted to see whether I could even write a program that does it. Any links to floating point arithmetic related material and such would be appreciated.

Thanks in advance for all and any advice anyone might have.

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1  
I'd suggest assigning x –  Nico Nov 3 '12 at 18:45
2  
Is x uninitialized? –  Laurynas Biveinis Nov 3 '12 at 18:45
    
Yes. Yes it was, and I just realized it should be a double. I changed it to int i; double x; before the loop and x=1.0*i; inside the loop on the first line (before the if-else if-chain). However, the loop still somehow ends and gives me the same result. –  user1796924 Nov 3 '12 at 18:52
2  
When comparing doubles, you should be working with epsilons. You shouldn't compare them directly with each other. double and float are probably not what you think they are. Read: cygnus-software.com/papers/comparingfloats/comparingfloats.htm –  Nikos C. Nov 3 '12 at 18:59
    
They probably aren't, and that page seems exactly what I wanted and needed to read. Thank a bunch! I'll be reading that and trying again. –  user1796924 Nov 3 '12 at 19:06

2 Answers 2

What is 'x' basically? You haven't initialize it and yet you are using it. So it may be the problem or bug you are facing.

share|improve this answer
    
Come to think about it, I don't even know why I'm using x. It's supposed to be the same x that is in the mathematical expression of the series, but why would I need to use a separate variable, since it's the same as the index or the loop counter. Duh, really shows that I'm new to this. Still, like I said, I tried initializing x to x=i inside the loop, but it doesn't change anything. –  user1796924 Nov 3 '12 at 18:56

Using the corrected function (per comments)

double series(void){

    double sum = 0.0, x;
    int i;

    for (i = 1; i > 0 ; i = i+1)
    {
        x = 1.0*i;
        if (sum - (sum - 1.0/x) == 0 || sum - (sum + 1.0/x) == 0)
        {
            printf("To infinity and beyond... almost!\n");
            return sum;
        }
        else if (i % 2 != 0)
        {
            sum = sum - 1.0/x;
        }
        else if (i % 2 == 0)
        {
            sum = sum + 1.0/x;
        }
        else
        {
            printf("How did I end up here?\n");
        }
    }
    printf("I ESCAPED THE LOOP\n");
    return 1.0*i;
}

to eliminate the undefined behaviour from using an uninitialised variable, let us see what happens.

The value of sum is always between -1.0 and 0.0, approaching (modulo floating point rounding) -log 2 (natural logarithm).

i is an int. From the result you get, we can infer (not strictly logically, but beyond reasonable doubt) that ints have 32 bits on your platform, and hence i < 2^31 = 2147483648. So the term to be added or subtracted, 1.0/i is larger in magnitude than 2^(-31). Since doubles usually have 53 bits of precision, each addition/subtraction changes sum enough that

sum - (sum - 1.0/x) == 0 || sum - (sum + 1.0/x) == 0

never becomes true. So the loop doesn't end by that condition, and i is incremented until it reaches INT_MAX, then once more.

That last increment overflows. That overflow of a signed integer invokes undefined behaviour, but in this case, the common behaviour of wrap-around occurred, and i then contains the value INT_MIN = -2147483648. Then the loop condition i > 0 evaluates to false, and the loop ends without returning from the function.

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Wow. Thanks! I had no idea that (the integer wrap-around) could even happen, and was so bewildered about the negative i that I didn't even stop to think about other stuff that could've gone wrong, like the if condition not ever happening. I assumed that the program would just keep running silently until I killed it or something even if the overflow did happen. Once again, thanks. I think I now have at least some idea on how to approach these problems. –  user1796924 Nov 3 '12 at 20:09
    
@user1796924 If you use a long long for i instead of an int, it will run for a long long time (and if your system doesn't use extended floating point representations but only the normal 64-bit IEEE754 type, will return from inside the loop). –  Daniel Fischer Nov 3 '12 at 20:12

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