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Below is a script that is run when a Change Password button is clicked for a form. The form contains 2 password fields, one for the new password, and one for confirming the new password. Here is the action script of the form:

<?php
session_start();

include("func.php");

$NewPassword = mysql_real_escape_string(md5($_POST['newpassword']));
$Confirm = mysql_real_escape_string(md5($_POST['confirmnewpassword']));
$userid = $_SESSION['username'];

if (!isset($NewPassword) || !isset($Confirm)) {
    header("Location: ../error.php");
    die("Error");
}else if ($NewPassword <> $Confirm) {
    header("Location: ../error.php");
    die("Error");
}else{
    dbConnect();

    mysql_query("UPDATE users SET password='$Confirm' WHERE username='$userid'");

    mysql_close($connect);

    header("Location: ../profile.php");
    die("Success");
}
?>

Even when the 2 password fields on the form are empty or do not match, the password is still updated in the database. Any reason for why this could be?

I appreciate any help offered.

share|improve this question
2  
isset() will allow empty passwords through, not only because it considers empty values to be set, but also because md5() will always generate a non-empty hash. Also, since you are using md5() on the input, there's no need to escape it. –  NullUserException Nov 3 '12 at 18:49
2  
The second case is more interesting, because if the passwords are indeed different, it should fail this condition ($NewPassword <> $Confirm). I recommend removing the redirects and doing a var_dump($_POST) and seeing what's there exactly. –  NullUserException Nov 3 '12 at 18:53
1  
The first step to debugging is the var_dump... Thank you, @NullUserException –  Matthew Blancarte Nov 3 '12 at 18:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You do not need mysql_real_escape_string enclosing the md5 function, as md5 returns an hex number.

 if (!isset($NewPassword) || !isset($Confirm)) {

will never evaluate to true, you should check if $_POST['newpassword'] and $_POST['confirmnewpassword'] are not empty - in this case if the passwords are both empty the password will be updated.

About the passwork being updated even if the password are different, are you 100% sure you are passing the variables using POST and not GET and the names of the parameters are 'newpassword' and 'confirmnewpassword'?

Try putting an "echo" to display the value of the variables to make sure you are passing the parameters properly, 99% the problem is there.

share|improve this answer
    
Using isset on $_POST['newpassword'] will not give you the desired result: ablazex.com/demos/post.php –  NullUserException Nov 3 '12 at 19:09
    
@NullUserException - What do you think about using !empty rather than isset? –  David Grenier Nov 3 '12 at 19:49
    
Thanks! All I needed to do was change !isset() to empty() and it worked perfectly fine. –  user1710563 Nov 3 '12 at 19:53

There is nothing in your code that would prevent an empty string from being hashed and uploaded. You're checking the hash, not the original string. This would explain why empty values still get updated.

However, if the values don't match, their hashes should be different. This would indicate to me that it's likely your variables $_POST['newpassword'] and $_POST['confirmnewpassword'] are not accurate. As other's have suggested, a var_dump or even print_r($_POST) statement at the beginning of your code will help you diagnose this.

Without even getting into bigger-picture questions like PDO vs. mysql or structuring your code differently, here's what I would do:

session_start();
include("func.php");

print_r ($_POST); // you'll want to delete this later 

$new_password = $_POST['newpassword']; // not technically necessary, my preferred style
$confirm_password = $_POST['confirmnewpassword']; // also not technically necessary
$userid = $_SESSION['username'];


/* Test the actual submitted password and confirmation to ensure they are set */
if (empty ($new_password) || empty ($confirm_password)) {
    /* header("Location: ../error.php"); */ // comment this out for now
    die ("Error: Password or Password Confirmation not set");
}

/* Test the actual submitted password and confirmation to ensure they match */
elseif ($new_password != $confirm_password) {
    /* header("Location: ../error.php"); */ // comment this out for now
    die("Error: Password and Password Confirmation do not match");
}

else {
    /* NOW that you have established the password and confirmation are both
     * set AND match, you get the hash value */
    $password_hash = mysql_real_escape_string(md5($new_password));
    dbConnect(); 
    mysql_query("UPDATE users SET password='$Confirm' WHERE username='$userid'");
    mysql_close($connect);
    /* header("Location: ../profile.php"); */ // comment this out for now
    die("Success: Updated");
}

This should allow you to debug your script and see what's going wrong. My guess is that data is either being passed as a GET or the variable names are incorrect.

Next steps:

  1. Once working, delete the var_dump and uncomment your redirects.
  2. Consider reworking your if statement to more explicitly test that the password is correct as stated in one of the other answers.
  3. Seriously, look into PDO or mysqli. Procedural mysql_* is in the process of being depricated.
  4. If you don't want to go the full OOP route, consider making functions like update_password () and send_error (). It would make your code more readable and reusable.

But one step at a time, lets get this current stuff debugged!

share|improve this answer

I can't find a specific reason why this isn't working (try using a debugger or debug messages), but I surely wouldn't put my password update in the 'else' branch!! Only update the password when you're 100% sure that the new password and its confirmation match and that they are validated against your password policy. At least assure that they are not empty strings.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 This is exactly what the OP is trying to accomplish. (ie: you are not offering any helpful advice) –  NullUserException Nov 3 '12 at 18:56
1  
@NullUserException: I am affering helpfull advice. Don't beso generous with your downvotes. Being 100% sure that two values match is not the same as being not 100% sure that you caught all other possible situations (defensive programming) –  Björn Boxstart Nov 3 '12 at 19:03
    
You're telling the OP to make sure the passwords match and that they are not empty and s/he is trying to do that already. So this doesn't answer the question at all. –  NullUserException Nov 3 '12 at 19:11
    
@NullUserException: During my programming classes (long ago) I learned that you must always be prepared for an unexpected situation. That is what the 'else' branche should be used for. Especially with important actions like changing passwords.If you've learned something different, that's fine, but i.m.h.o. it its not a reason for downvoting my answer. I would appreciate it if you would undo this. –  Björn Boxstart Nov 3 '12 at 19:24
    
It's fine to offer extra advice, but the problem I have with your answer is that it does not answer the question. I'll remove the downvote if you address the OP's problems. –  NullUserException Nov 3 '12 at 19:26

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