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I am writing some kind of a wrapper for WCF calls (using BackgroundWorker) to keep GUI from freezing while the call is ongoing. It is working mostly as it should, but I have a problem with the BackgroundWorker when the WCF call is throwing an exception. If an exception occurs in DoWork, I am able to detect it in RunWorkCompleted, but rethrowing it to the GUI does not work. I have read numerous threads with people mentioning that this should work.

Code for the wrapper (notice that the WCF call is symbolized by an exception being thrown):

private void GetSomething(Action<IEnumerable<int>> completedAction)
{
    BackgroundWorker b = new BackgroundWorker();

    b.DoWork += (s, evt) => { throw new Exception(); evt.Result = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 }; };

    b.RunWorkerCompleted += (s, evt) =>
    {
        if (evt.Error == null && completedAction != null)
        {
           completedAction((IEnumerable<int>)evt.Result);
        }
        else if(evt.Error != null)
        {
           throw evt.Error;
        }
    };

    b.RunWorkerAsync();
}

Invoking code in a Windows form:

private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    try
    {
        GetSomething(list =>
        {
           foreach (int i in list)
           {
              listView1.Items.Add(new ListViewItem(i.ToString()));
           }
        });
    }
    catch (Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
    }
}

While debugging this, I get:

  1. "Exception of type 'System.Exception' was thrown" in DoWork
  2. "Exception of type 'System.Exception' was thrown" at throw evt.Error
  3. "TargetInvocationException was unhandled" at Application.Run(new Form1()) in the Main method

What am I doing wrong? I would like to catch the exception in the Windows form.

share|improve this question
    
you should be handling the exception in RunWorkerCompleted .Is there any specific reason you are rethrowing. –  unikorn Nov 3 '12 at 19:53
    
@CodeIgnoto: My idea was to push this decision to the caller. I would not like to use message boxes, say, from this wrapper. It should be as GUI agnostic as possible –  MRT Nov 3 '12 at 20:54
    
In my experience any exceptions thrown in the RunWorkerCompleted code will bring the application down. So go for Tasks or handle it there. If you use a while(true)Application.DoEvents() instead of Application.Run() when starting you can do a try catch around the doevents and it will grab the exception you just rethrown tho. But some code might not run as expected with that kind of "message" loop. –  Wolf5 Nov 4 '12 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The event b.RunWorkerCompleted is where you should do the error handling. You can pass in an Action<Exception> to do the error handling like

private void GetSomething(Action<IEnumerable<int>> completedAction, Action<Exception> exceptionAction)
{
    BackgroundWorker b = new BackgroundWorker();

    b.DoWork += (s, evt) => { throw new Exception(); evt.Result = new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 }; };

    b.RunWorkerCompleted += (s, evt) =>
    {
        if (evt.Error == null && completedAction != null)
            completedAction((IEnumerable<int>)evt.Result);
        else if(evt.Error != null)
            exceptionAction(evt.Error);
    };

    b.RunWorkerAsync();
}

However this tends to get ugly. If you use .Net 4 or 4.5 you can resort to Tasks. The Task<TResult> was created for exactly that case:

Task<IEnumerable<int>> GetSomething()
{
    return Task.Factory.StartNew(() => { 
        Thread.Sleep(2000);
        throw new Exception(); 
        return (new List<int> { 1, 2, 3 }).AsEnumerable(); 
        });
}

Task basically is a signalling construct with

  • a .Result property
  • an .Exception property
  • a .ContinueWith() method

Within ContinueWith() you can check if the Task in a faulted state (Exception got thrown).

You can use it like

    private void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        GetSomething()
            .ContinueWith(task =>
                {
                    if (task.IsCanceled)
                    {
                    }
                    else if (task.IsFaulted)
                    {
                        var ex = task.Exception.InnerException;
                        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
                    }
                    else if (task.IsCompleted)
                    {
                        var list = task.Result;
                        foreach (int i in list)
                        {
                            listView1.Items.Add(new ListViewItem(i.ToString()));
                        }
                    }
                });
    }

If you use .Net 4.5 and C#5 (you need VS2012 or VS2010 and the Async CTP) you can even resort to async and await like

    private async void button3_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        try
        {
            var list = await GetSomething();
            foreach (int i in list)
            {
                listView1.Items.Add(new ListViewItem(i.ToString()));
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            MessageBox.Show(ex.Message);
        }
    }

... and all the magic is done by the compiler. Note that you can use try catch as you are used to.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I will try it –  MRT Nov 3 '12 at 20:50
    
Hi again. I tried it now. First problem was that "foreach (int i in list)" would not compile, since the return type of GetSomething is a Task. After changing it to iterate over task.Result, my GUI gets blocked during the call and the exception is not caught. –  MRT Nov 4 '12 at 9:01
    
Sorry. You are absolutely right. The example with ContinueWith was nonsense. I corrected it. However, the GUI should not be blocked if you use Task.Factory.StartNew(). –  PeterB Nov 4 '12 at 18:11
    
I will try this, thanks. Actually I think your first solution with passing an Action<Exception> is the simplest. This will abstract a lot of details away from the GUI. –  MRT Nov 4 '12 at 20:45

You should change this:

throw evt.Error;

To this:

MessageBox.Show(evt.Error.Message);

Your exception is currently unhandled because the RunWorkerCompleted handler is running later. It is not running within the try/catch you have in button3_Click.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point, thanks. –  MRT Nov 4 '12 at 20:43

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