Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Can someone explain to me why the following code produces the exception it does?

>>> class CallableKlass(object):
    def __init__(self, callible):
        self.callible = callible
    def __call__(self, arg):
        return self.callible(arg)


>>> class Klass(object):
    d = {'foo': 'bar'}
    m = CallableKlass(lambda x: d[x])


>>> Klass.m('foo')

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#10>", line 1, in <module>
    Klass.m('foo')
  File "<pyshell#5>", line 5, in __call__
    return self.callible(arg)
  File "<pyshell#9>", line 3, in <lambda>
    m = CallableKlass(lambda x: d[x])
NameError: global name 'd' is not defined
share|improve this question
    
I believe it's Class and not a Klass. –  iTayb Nov 3 '12 at 19:36
    
@iTayb I think the OP just wanted to avoid keyword conflicts. –  millimoose Nov 3 '12 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The class namespace (stuff defined directly in the class body) is not accessible from within functions defined in that namespace. A lambda is just a function, so this applies to lambdas as well. Your CallableKlass is a red herring. The behavior is the same in this simpler case:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     d = {'foo': 'bar'}
...     (lambda stuff: d[stuff])('foo')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#3>", line 1, in <module>
    class Foo(object):
  File "<pyshell#3>", line 3, in Foo
    (lambda stuff: d[stuff])('foo')
  File "<pyshell#3>", line 3, in <lambda>
    (lambda stuff: d[stuff])('foo')
NameError: global name 'd' is not defined
>>> class Foo(object):
...     d = {'foo': 'bar'}
...     def f(stuff):
...         d[stuff]
...     f('foo')
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<pyshell#4>", line 1, in <module>
    class Foo(object):
  File "<pyshell#4>", line 5, in Foo
    f('foo')
  File "<pyshell#4>", line 4, in f
    d[stuff]
NameError: global name 'd' is not defined
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Do you know why Python chooses to exhibit this behaviour? It seems at odds with its normal closure rules - cf functions defined in functions –  Benjamin Hodgson Nov 3 '12 at 22:08
1  
@poorsod: I'm not totally sure, but I think it's to avoid method names shadowing global functions. If class-level attributes were in scope for subsequent methods, and you wrote a class that contained a sum method, say, then all methods defined after that in the class block would no longer have access to the builtin sum function (they'd be reading the just-defined method instead). –  BrenBarn Nov 4 '12 at 0:47

you should use Klass.d inside lambda, as the variables declared inside a class becomes attribute of that class. That's why your program raised that error, as it is not able to find anything like d in global variables.:

class Klass(object):
    d = {'foo': 'bar'}
    m = CallableKlass(lambda x: Klass.d[x])
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.