Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I had enum class, say

enum class Enum{
   var1, var2;
}

Now I want to add some member which depends on parameter i.e var3(int). OK, It's not for enum, so I want to change it by regular class, but my goal is to leave old code(Enum::var1 as value of type Enum) possible to compile.

I tried to do it this way(let's temporary forgot about var3, it'll be static function):

class Enum{
    public:
        const static Enum var1 = Enum(1);
        const static Enum var2 = Enum(2);
    private:
        Enum(int v):v(v){
        }
    int v;
    //operator == using v
};

But it doesn't compile because Enum has incomplete type.
I can't declare it after class because it's in header so it'll not work with multiple cpp's. Besides, it's not great idea to have public constructor here.

Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
2  
The biggest problem with this will be that you couldn't use Enum::var1 where a constant expression is required. –  Xeo Nov 3 '12 at 20:24
    
@Xeo1: will constexpr fix it? BTW, no need to use as constexpr(for now, maybe) –  RiaD Nov 3 '12 at 20:26
1  
No, since a class type can't be used as a, say, non-type template parameter. –  Xeo Nov 3 '12 at 20:28
    
@Xeo: anyway, if I want add something that depends on parameter, I'll never have this advantage:), But thanks for useful comment. –  RiaD Nov 3 '12 at 20:34
    
You wanted that everyone can use Enum::var1 just the same as before. However, if var1 is of type Enum now, and Enum is a class-type, and you used Enum::var1 in a constant expression before, the code will not compile anymore. –  Xeo Nov 3 '12 at 20:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Solution 1:

For the static variable problem: declare your static variables in the class declaration:

class Enum
{
    public:
        static const Enum var1;
        static const Enum var2;
        Enum(int v):v(v)
        {
        }
    private:
        int v;
        //operator == using v
};

Then, create a source file for this class, Enum.cpp, containing:

#include "Enum.h"
const Enum Enum::var1 = Enum(1);
const Enum Enum::var2 = Enum(2);

Solution 2:

If you want it to be header-only, you can use static variables instead of class variables:

class Enum
{
    public:
        Enum(int v):v(v)
        {
        }
    private:
        int v;
};

namespace Enumeration // It is not possible to name it 'Enum'
{
    // static => local to translation unit. No linking conflict
    static const Enum var1 = Enum(1);
    static const Enum var2 = Enum(2);
}

You can see a live example here. The only drawback is that you cannot use the name of the class for the namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
It's cool, but I want to void it because I need to provide ONLY header to end-user –  RiaD Nov 3 '12 at 20:25
    
Won't be able to use them where a constant expression is required. –  Xeo Nov 3 '12 at 20:25
    
BTW doesn't compile with private ctor. Fixed it in your code. –  RiaD Nov 3 '12 at 20:31
    
@RiaD, you can write initialization var1 and var2 in Enum.h, after class declaration. –  Ruu Nov 3 '12 at 20:40
    
@Ruu and user will get compile error with two cpp's that include it. –  RiaD Nov 3 '12 at 20:43

You can write a class like this:

class Enum
{
public
    enum NestedEnum : int
    {
        var1, var2
    };

    static NestedEnum var3;

    Enum(NestedEnum value) : value(value) { }

    operator NestedEnum() const { return value; }
private:
    NestedEnum value;
};

And anywhere else you can declare:

Enum::var3 = (Enum::NestedEnum)someIntegerVariable;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.