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Is there a better way of doing this...

MyString.Trim().Replace("&", "and").Replace(",", "").Replace("  ", " ")
         .Replace(" ", "-").Replace("'", "").Replace("/", "").ToLower();

I've extended the string class to keep it down to one job but is there a quicker way?

public static class StringExtension
{
    public static string clean(this string s)
    {
        return s.Replace("&", "and").Replace(",", "").Replace("  ", " ")
                .Replace(" ", "-").Replace("'", "").Replace(".", "")
                .Replace("eacute;", "é").ToLower();
    }
}

Just for fun (and to stop the arguments in the comments) I've shoved a gist up benchmarking the various examples below.

https://gist.github.com/ChrisMcKee/5937656

The regex option scores terribly; the dictionary option comes up the fastest; the long winded version of the stringbuilder replace is slightly faster than the short hand.

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Based on what you have in your benchmarks it looks like the dictionary version isn't doing all of the replacements which I suspect is what is making it faster than the StringBuilder solutions. –  toad Sep 12 at 21:23
1  
@toad Hi from 2009; I added a comment below in April about that glaring mistake. The gist is updated though I skipped over D. The dictionary version is still faster. –  Chris McKee Sep 15 at 0:24

6 Answers 6

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Quicker - no. More effective - yes, if you will use the StringBuilder class. With your implementation each operation generates a copy of a string which under circumstances may impair performance. Strings are immutable objects so each operation just returns a modified copy.

If you expect this method to be actively called on multiple Strings of significant length, it might be better to "migrate" its implementation onto the StringBuilder class. With it any modification is performed directly on that instance, so you spare unnecessary copy operations.

public static class StringExtention
{
    public static string clean(this string s)
    {
        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder (s);

        sb.Replace("&", "and");
        sb.Replace(",", "");
        sb.Replace("  ", " ");
        sb.Replace(" ", "-");
        sb.Replace("'", "");
        sb.Replace(".", "");
        sb.Replace("eacute;", "é");

        return sb.ToString().ToLower();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For clarity the dictionary answer is the fastest stackoverflow.com/a/1321366/52912 –  Chris McKee Jul 6 '13 at 20:28
2  
In your benchmark on gist.github.com/ChrisMcKee/5937656 the dictionary test is not complete: it does not do all replacements and " " replaces " ", not " ". Not doing all replacements could be the reason, why it's fastest in the benchmark. The regex replacement is not complete, either. But most importantly your string TestData is very short. Like the accepted answer states, the string has to be of significant length for the StringBuilder to be of advantage. Could you please repeat the benchmark with strings of 10kB, 100kB and 1MB? –  Leif Feb 14 at 8:42
    
Its a good point; as it stands it was being used for url cleansing so testings at 100kb - 1mb would have been unrealistic. I will update the benchmark so its using the whole thing though, that was a mistake. –  Chris McKee Apr 25 at 9:30

Maybe a little more readable?

    public static class StringExtension {

        private static Dictionary<string, string> _replacements = new Dictionary<string, string>();

        static StringExtension() {
            _replacements["&"] = "and";
            _replacements[","] = "";
            _replacements["  "] = " ";
            // etc...
        }

        public static string clean(this string s) {
            foreach (string to_replace in _replacements.Keys) {
                s = s.Replace(to_replace, _replacements[to_replace]);
            }
            return s;
        }
    }

Also add New In Town's suggestion about StringBuilder...

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1  
It would be more readable like this: private static Dictionary<string, string> _replacements = new Dictionary<string, string>() { {"&", "and"}, {",", ""}, {" ", " "} /* etc */ }; –  ANeves Aug 4 '11 at 10:04
    
or of course... private static readonly Dictionary<string, string> Replacements = new Dictionary<string, string>() { { "&", "and" }, { ",", "" }, { " ", " " } /* etc */ }; public static string Clean(this string s) { return Replacements.Keys.Aggregate(s, (current, toReplace) => current.Replace(toReplace, Replacements[toReplace])); } –  Chris McKee Jul 5 '13 at 22:22

this will be more effecient:

public static class StringExtention
{
    public static string clean(this string s)
    {
        return (new StringBuilder(s)).Replace("&", "and").Replace(",", "")
             .Replace("  ", " ").Replace(" ", "-").Replace("'", "")
             .Replace(".", "").Replace("eacute;", "é").ToString().ToLower();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Really hard to read. I am sure you know what it does but a Junior Dev will scratch his head at what actually goes on. I agree- I also always look for the shortes hand of writting something- But it was only for my own satisfaction. Other people were freaking out at the pile of mess. –  ppumkin Feb 12 '13 at 10:55
1  
This is actually slower. BenchmarkOverhead... 13ms StringClean-user151323... 2843ms StringClean-TheVillageIdiot... 2921ms Varies on reruns but the answer wins gist.github.com/anonymous/5937596 –  Chris McKee Jul 5 '13 at 22:16

I'm doing something similar, but in my case I'm doing serialization/De-serialization so I need to be able to go both directions. I find using a string[][] works nearly identically to the dictionary, including initialization, but you can go the other direction too, returning the substitutes to their original values, something that the dictionary really isn't set up to do.

Edit: You can use Dictionary<Key,List<Values>> in order to obtain same result as string[][]

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If you are simply after a pretty solution and don't need to save a few nanoseconds, how about some LINQ sugar?

var input = "test1test2test3";
var replacements = new Dictionary<string, string> { { "1", "*" }, { "2", "_" }, { "3", "&" } };

var output = replacements.Aggregate(input, (current, replacement) => current.Replace(replacement.Key, replacement.Value));
share|improve this answer
    
Similar to example C in the Gist (if you look above it the uglier linq statement is in the comment) –  Chris McKee Sep 15 at 0:26
    
Interesting that you define a functional statment as "Uglier" than a procedural one. –  TimS Sep 15 at 0:36
    
not going to argue about it; its merely preference. As you say, linq is simply syntactic sugar; and as I said I'd already put the equivalent above the code :) –  Chris McKee Sep 15 at 8:48

There is one thing that may be optimized in the suggested solutions. Having many calls to Replace() makes the code to do multiple passes over the same string. With very long strings the solutions may be slow because of CPU cache capacity misses. May be one should consider replacing multiple strings in a single pass.

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