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Hi guys so I am making function for my graphs (adjacency matrices) to return number of connected components using breadth first search algorithm.

It almost works properly. It returns proper value if number of components is equal to number of vertices, but if number of components is smaller than number of vertices it returns (proper value +1). I have no idea how to fix it, so if you could give it a look and tell me I would be glad. Heres the link to the code it looks more decent then the one below http://wklej.org/id/861341/

int Graph::getNumberOfConnectedComponents()
{
    int components=0;
    queue<int> S;
    int n = getVerticesCount();//as name indicates it returns number of vertices in graph
    bool* visited = new bool[n];
    for(int i=1;i<n;i++)
        visited[i]=false;

    visited[0]=true;
    S.push(0);
    while(!S.empty())
    {
        int v = S.front();
        S.pop();
        list<int> x = getNeighbors(v);//as name indicates this function returns list of neighbours of given vertice
        if(!x.empty())
        {
            list<int>::iterator it;
            for (it=x.begin(); it!=x.end(); it++)
            {
                if(visited[*it]==false)
                {
                    S.push(*it);
                    visited[*it]=true;
                }
            }
        }

        if(S.empty())
        {
            components++;
            for(int i=1;i<n;i++)
            {
                if(visited[i]==false)
                {
                    S.push(i);
                    visited[i]=true;
                    break;
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return components;
}

I explained what those functions do in comments, hope you will be able to help me :/ . Btw if you change place of components++; and put it into if(visited[i]==false) it gives proper value for all graphs except those which number of components = number of vertices (for those this value is "proper value-1").

@Edit 1 , here is this function john

list<int> AdjacencyMatrixGraph::getNeighbors(int v)
 {
     list<int> x;
     if(v==0||v>=n)
     return x;

     for(int j=0;j<n;j++)
     {
     if(matrix[v][j]!=0)
         x.push_front(j);
     }
     return x;
 }
share|improve this question
    
Can only think that getNeighbors is bugged for some reason. So every vertex is acting as it's own component. – john Nov 3 '12 at 21:09
    
i don't think so i will update this function in my 1st post cuz i cant post it here. – MeIsNoob Nov 3 '12 at 21:17
    
OK, maybe the way you set up your matrix is wrong. Really I'm just guessing until I see a complete program. – john Nov 3 '12 at 21:18
    
Just a note, bool *visited = new bool[n](); will initialize all the values of visited to false for you. – noko Nov 3 '12 at 21:19
list<int> AdjacencyMatrixGraph::getNeighbors(int v)
 {
     list<int> x;
     if(v==0||v>=n)
     return x;

should be

list<int> AdjacencyMatrixGraph::getNeighbors(int v)
 {
     list<int> x;
     if(v<0||v>=n)
     return x;

vertex 0 can have neighbors as far as I can tell.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you I am so stupid :) . I just assumed that my previous code is correct and thats why i was so puzzled. Now everything works fine. – MeIsNoob Nov 3 '12 at 21:24
    
A debugger would have found that error pretty quickly, easier than staring at code. – john Nov 3 '12 at 21:26
    
I am pretty new to it, do you have any tutorial on how to use debugger? – MeIsNoob Nov 3 '12 at 21:32
    
Usually they come with your compiler, so how to use one depends on which compiler/IDE you are using. The basic idea is that you can run your code one line at a time, looking at the values of variables as you go. So you would have quickly noticed that vertex 0 didn't have any neighbors. – john Nov 3 '12 at 21:36

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