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I was using js2coffee but it doesn't seem to translate because I get an unexpected identifier.

$.fn.wait = function( ms, callback ) {
    return this.each(function() {
        window.setTimeout((function( self ) {
            return function() {
                callback.call( self );
            }
        }( this )), ms );
    });
};

My coffee version:

$.fn.wait = (ms, callback) ->
  @each ->
    window.setTimeout ((self) ->
      ->
        callback.call self
    (this)), ms
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closed as too localized by Daniel A. White, Mark Rotteveel, KooKiz, Ria, Bo Persson Nov 4 '12 at 11:11

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First clean up your JavaScript version so that it isn't trying to be overly clever and difficult to read; the inlined self-executing function really doesn't do anything for you except make the people maintaining and reading your code hate you:

$.fn.wait = function( ms, callback ) {
    return this.each(function() {
        var _this = this;
        window.setTimeout(function() {
            callback.call(_this);
        }, ms);
    });
};

That's less noisy and easier to grok at a glance. The var _this = this trick is generally replaced by a fat-arrow (=>) in CoffeeScript so we're left with this:

$.fn.wait = (ms, callback) ->
    @each(->
        fn = () => callback.call(@)
        setTimeout(fn, ms)
    )

Yes, parentheses are often optional in CoffeeScript but optional and forbidden are different words so I tend to include the parentheses to make the structure easier to see. You could also skip the fn variable with something horrific like this:

setTimeout(
    => callback.call(@)
, ms)

or this:

setTimeout (=> callback.call(@)), ms

but throwing an extra variable into the mix is, IMO, much easier on the eyes.

Demos:

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Use the fat arrow (=>):

$.fn.wait = (ms, callback) ->
  @each ->
    window.setTimeout( =>
      =>
        callback.call( this );
    , ms)

It compiles to:

$.fn.wait = function(ms, callback) {
  return this.each(function() {
    var _this = this;
    return window.setTimeout(function() {
      return function() {
        return callback.call(_this);
      };
    }, ms);
  });
};

The fat arrow => can be used to both define a function, and to bind it to the current value of this, right on the spot. This is helpful when using callback-based libraries like Prototype or jQuery, for creating iterator functions to pass to each, or event-handler functions to use with bind. Functions created with the fat arrow are able to access properties of the this where they're defined.

(Source: http://coffeescript.org/#fat_arrow)

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Use the cleaned up version by @mu-is-too-short, it's much nicer :) –  robbi5 Nov 3 '12 at 21:23

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