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I'm trying to format a time using a variable input. If a user enter an hour as 1 - 9 the out put would include a "0", and the same for minutes. So far if a user enters 1 hour 3 minutes the output reads 1:3 instead of 01:03.

How do I get the extra 0 in front of numbers less than 10.

Here's the code.....

import java.util.Scanner;

public class FormatTime {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);

        int MinutesInput;
        int HoursInput;
        int Hours;
        int Minutes;

        {
            System.out.println("Enter hours between 1 and 24");
            Hours = input.nextInt();
            System.out.println("Enter minutes between 1 and 59");
            Minutes = input.nextInt();

            {
                **//THIS NEXT LINE IS THE PROBLEM**
                HoursInput = Hours < 10 ? "0" + Hours : Hours;
                System.out.print(HoursInput + ":");
            }
            {
                **//THIS NEXT LINE IS THE PROBLEM**
                MinutesInput = (Minutes < 10) ? "0" + Minutes : (Minutes); 
                System.out.print(MinutesInput);
            }
            System.out.println();
        }

    }
}
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4 Answers 4

Perhaps you should be using

System.out.printf("%02d:%02d%n", Hours, Minutes);
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How do I get the extra 0 in front of numbers less than 10.

You don't, while the target variable is of type int. An int is just a number, not a string - whereas "0" + Hours is a string.

int values don't contain any sort of string representation - the number sixteen is just as much "0x10" or "0b10000" as it is "16"... or even "00016" if your decimal representation allows much digits. ("00016" may be mis-interpreted as fourteen, however, if it's parsed as an octal string...)

Use DecimalFormat to convert numbers into strings in your desired format, or String.format, or possibly just PrintStream.printf if you want to write it straight to the console.

I'd also strongly recommend that you use camelCase for your local variables, and only declare them when you first need them.

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Wouldn't it be the same as 0020, not 00016? Since you're describing how to write 16 in hex and binary, but 00016 won't actually give you the number sixteen... –  Louis Wasserman Nov 3 '12 at 20:56
    
@LouisWasserman: It depends on whether or not you're assuming some horrible octal-parsing format. Will edit to clarify. –  Jon Skeet Nov 3 '12 at 20:57
    
as I'm only learning, I'm told by my tutor the user will input a valid time. –  Brian Forbes Nov 3 '12 at 21:32
    
@BrianForbes: I don't see how that's relevant to my answer... –  Jon Skeet Nov 3 '12 at 21:33

You are confusing int and String types:

int HoursInput;
//...
HoursInput = Hours < 10 ? "0" + Hours : Hours;

There are two problems with your code: you are trying to store string "07" (or similar) in an int. Secondly even if it was possible, 07 is equivalent to 7 as far as integer types are concerned (well, leading 0 has a special octal meaning, but that's not the point).

Try this instead:

String hoursInput;
//...
hoursInput = Hours < 10 ? "0" + Hours : "" + Hours;
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I used this and it worked thanks a lot your ace. I just had to change the HoursInput and MinutesInput values to a string. Simple –  Brian Forbes Nov 3 '12 at 21:22

you must use String variables or use format method (similar to sprintf from c) from String class.

String time = String.format("%02d:%02d", hours, minutes );
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