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How can I count the number of occurrences in c of each letter (ignoring case) in the string? So that it would print out letter: # number of occurences, I have code to count the occurences of one letter, but how can I count the occurence of each letter in the string?

{
    char
    int count = 0;
    int i;

    //int length = strlen(string);

    for (i = 0; i < 20; i++)
    {
        if (string[i] == ch)
        {
            count++;
        }
    }

    return count;
}

output:

a : 1
b : 0
c : 2
etc...
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8 Answers 8

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Let's assume you have a system where char is eight bit and all the characters you're trying to count are encoded using a non-negative number. In this case, you can write:

const char *str = "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.";

int counts[256] = { 0 };

int i;
size_t len = strlen(str);

for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    counts[(int)(str[i])]++;
}

for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
    printf("The %d. character has %d occurrences.\n", i, counts[i]);
}

Note that this will count all the characters in the string. If you are 100% absolutely positively sure that your string will have only letters (no numbers, no whitespace, no punctuation) inside, then 1. asking for "case insensitiveness" starts to make sense, 2. you can reduce the number of entries to the number of characters in the English alphabet (namely 26) and you can write something like this:

#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

const char *str = "TheQuickBrownFoxJumpedOverTheLazyDog";

int counts[26] = { 0 };

int i;
size_t len = strlen(str);

for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
    // Just in order that we don't shout ourselves in the foot
    char c = str[i];
    if (!isalpha(c)) continue;

    counts[(int)(tolower(c) - 'a')]++;
}

for (i = 0; i < 26; i++) {
    printf("'%c' has %2d occurrences.\n", i + 'a', counts[i]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
This code gives me this: The 0. character has 0 occurrences. The 1. character has 0 occurrences. ..... –  enginefree Nov 3 '12 at 21:23
    
@user1786283 what you listed is a dash (-). I don't believe you got that. –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 21:23
    
@user1786283 Aaaaaaand... What's wrong with that? It means that the character 0x00 had zero occurrences. And so on. You know, there's a scroll bar in the right side of the terminal window in case you're using a modern GUI-based OS. Also, have you made the effort to try the second code snipped? –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 21:25
    
size_t len = strlen(str); ^~~~~~~~~~~ Untitled.c:12:1: error: expected identifier or '(' for (i = 0; i < len; i++) { ^ 2 errors generated. –  enginefree Nov 3 '12 at 21:31
    
@user1786283 you have to wrap it into an int main(). –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 21:34

Like this:

int counts[26];
memset(counts, 0, sizeof(counts));
char *p = string;
while (*p) {
    counts[tolower(*p++) - 'a']++;
}

This code assumes that the string is null-terminated, and that it contains only characters a through z or A through Z, inclusive.

To understand how this works, recall that after conversion tolower each letter has a code between a and z, and that the codes are consecutive. As the result, tolower(*p) - 'a' evaluates to a number from 0 to 25, inclusive, representing the letter's sequential number in the alphabet.

This code combines ++ and *p to shorten the program.

share|improve this answer
    
Woops, actually neither of us managed to fully pay attention to OP ;-) "ignoring case" is what he meant. –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 21:03
    
@H2CO3 You are right, thanks! I added the tolower, and expanded the assumptions. Thank you very much! –  dasblinkenlight Nov 3 '12 at 21:06
    
You're welcome. (I'll extend my answer as well.) –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 21:07

You can use the following code.

main()
{
    int i = 0,j=0,count[26]={0};
    char ch = 97;
    char string[100]="Hello how are you buddy ?";
    for (i = 0; i < 100; i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<26;j++)
            {
            if (tolower(string[i]) == (ch+j))
                {
                    count[j]++;
                }
        }
    }
    for(j=0;j<26;j++)
        {

            printf("\n%c -> %d",97+j,count[j]);

    }

}

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
For the string The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog. it gives me, a -> 0 b -> 1 c -> 1 d -> 0 e -> 1 f -> 1 g -> 0 h -> 1 i -> 1 j -> 0 k -> 1 l -> 0 m -> 0 n -> 1 o -> 2 p -> 0 q -> 1 r -> 1 s -> 0 t -> 1 u -> 1 v -> 0 w -> 1 x -> 1 y -> 0 z -> 0, but it should be 1 for every letter. –  enginefree Nov 3 '12 at 21:13
    
In the letter jumps –  enginefree Nov 3 '12 at 21:15
    
@user1786283 Are you sure you didn't write "jumped"? –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 21:16
    
No i used a panagram, en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pangram –  enginefree Nov 3 '12 at 21:19
    
It does work. Check this out codepad.org/DKsiQe91 –  CCoder Nov 3 '12 at 21:36

One simple possibility would be to make an array of 26 ints, each is a count for a letter a-z:

int alphacount[26] = {0}; //[0] = 'a', [1] = 'b', etc

Then loop through the string and increment the count for each letter:

for(int i = 0; i<strlen(mystring); i++)      //for the whole length of the string
    if(isalpha(mystring[i]))
        alphacount[tolower(mystring[i])-'a']++;  //make the letter lower case (if it's not)
                                                 //then use it as an offset into the array
                                                 //and increment

It's a simple idea that works for A-Z, a-z. If you want to separate by capitals you just need to make the count 52 instead and subtract the correct ASCII offset

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int charset[256] = {0};
int charcount[256] = {0};

for (i = 0; i < 20; i++)
{
    for(int c = 0; c < 256; c++)
    {
        if(string[i] == charset[c])
        {
           charcount[c]++;
        }
    }
}

charcount will store the occurence of any character in the string.

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#include<stdio.h>
#include<string.h>

#define filename "somefile.txt"

int main()
{
    FILE *fp;
    int count[26] = {0}, i, c;  
    char ch;
    char alpha[27] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuwxyz";
    fp = fopen(filename,"r");
    if(fp == NULL)
        printf("file not found\n");
    while( (ch = fgetc(fp)) != EOF) {
        c = 0;
        while(alpha[c] != '\0') {

            if(alpha[c] == ch) {
                count[c]++; 
            }
            c++;
        }
    }
    for(i = 0; i<26;i++) {
        printf("character %c occured %d number of times\n",alpha[i], count[i]);
    }
    return 0;
}
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for (int i=0;i<word.length();i++){
         int counter=0;
         for (int j=0;j<word.length();j++){
             if(word.charAt(i)==word.charAt(j))
             counter++;
             }// inner for
             JOptionPane.showMessageDialog( null,word.charAt(i)+" found "+ counter +" times");
         }// outer for
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After Accept Answer

Though of a method that meets these specs. (IMO, the other answers do not meet all)

  1. Is practical/efficient when char has a wide range. IWO: CHAR_BIT is 16 or 32, so no bool Used[1 << CHAR_BIT];

  2. Works for very long strings (use size_t rather than int).

  3. Does not rely on ASCII. ( Use Upper[] )

  4. Defined behavior when a char < 0. isalpha() defined for EOF and unsigned char

    static const char Upper[] = "ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ";
    static const char Lower[] = "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz";
    
    void LetterOccurances(size_t *Count, const char *s) {
      memset(Count, 0, 26*sizeof Count);
      while (*s) {
        unsigned char ch = *s;
        if (isalpha(ch)) {
          const char *caseset = Upper;
          char *p = strchr(caseset, ch);
          if (p == NULL) {
            caseset = Lower;
            p = strchr(caseset, ch);
          }
          if (p != NULL) {
            Count[p - caseset]++;
          }
        }
      }
    }
    
    // sample usage
    char *s = foo();
    size_t Count[26];
    LetterOccurances(Count, s);
    for (int i=0; i<26; i++)
      printf("%c : %zu\n", Upper[i], Count[i]);
    }
    
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