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I am trying to loop through an array and count the number of prime numbers in it...Simple enough but I am missing something...

count = 0;
for(i =0; i<5; i++)
{
    flag = true;    // is prime
    for (j=2;j<a[i];j++)
    {
        if(a[i] % j == 0)
        {
            flag = false;
        }


    }

    count ++;
}
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closed as not constructive by dawnoflife, Jim O'Neil, Sgoettschkes, Nimit Dudani, David Segonds Dec 3 '12 at 8:59

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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Change your code to this

flag = true;    // is prime
for (j=2;j<a[i];j++)
{
    if(a[i] % j == 0)
    {
        flag = false;
        break;
    }

}
if (flag) {
   count++;
}   

Once you have counted a non prime you might as well break out of the loop - it is not going to become unprime again with repeated testing

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1  
If this was an IOCCC entry, I'd suggest it to change into count += flag; :P –  user529758 Nov 3 '12 at 21:50
1  
You don't need a flag at all: Just advance count and break out of the inner loop. –  alexis Nov 3 '12 at 21:52
    
@alexis Yes you could simply count++, and break but you would then need to calculate primes from array_length - count. If you want count to represent the prime count, you need to check if its still true after the loop. Unless I have totally misunderstood what you mean which is always possible –  mathematician1975 Nov 3 '12 at 21:54
    
oh right, i got the sense of the flag backwards. –  alexis Nov 3 '12 at 21:59
    
But you could always increment, and in the case of a composite, decrement. Not that that's really better than checking a flag. –  Daniel Fischer Nov 3 '12 at 22:01
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You are missing a condition before count++.

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ah okay. got it –  dawnoflife Nov 3 '12 at 21:49
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You increase count even if flag is false.

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Blah fixed it with a (flag == true) condition before count ++;

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You forgot the "if" in line "count++;"

count = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    var flag = true;    // is prime
    for (var j = 2; j < a[i]; j++)
    {
        if (a[i] % j == 0)
        {
            flag = false;
            break; //this break will avoid useless process
        }

    }

    // only when the flag is false that the current number is prime.
    if(!flag) count++;
}

but a better way to do that is:

count = 0;
for (var i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
    for (var j = 2; j < a[i]; j++)
    {
        if (a[i] % j == 0)
        {
            count++; // don't need a variable flag, put increment here.
            break;
        }
    }
}
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