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I am confused on how to fill a vector with values from a different class.

Can anyone give me a coded example how this is done. :)

Class A
{
   //vector is here
}
Class B
{
   //add values to the vector here
}
 main()
{
  //access the vector here, and print out the values
}

I appreciate the help <3

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This is not an object-oriented thing to do. Nothing wrong with that, but you shouldn't be using classes then. –  leftaroundabout Nov 3 '12 at 21:53
    
I suggest you start actually learning the language and OOP principles first. Here is a good link for a book: books.google.de/books/about/… –  pokey909 Nov 3 '12 at 21:55
1  
You could as well come to musician's forum and ask how to play notes. –  user1773602 Nov 3 '12 at 21:57
    
If you take the time to actually read slavik262's answer you can answer your question by yourself. No magic involved. –  pokey909 Nov 3 '12 at 21:58
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3 Answers 3

It seems like a quick lesson in access levels and encapsulation is in order.

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may the down-voter explain his/her decision? Excellent answer IMO. –  pokey909 Nov 3 '12 at 21:56
    
Not my vote down but I'd like to offer my suggestion on the reason. Perhaps the answer, although correct and straight to the point, was perceived as cold and dismissive by OP (or whoever set the downvote)? Just because I dislike downvoting (especially without a reason provided, which is immature and border-line bullying, sometimes) I just graded you up. Enjoy! –  Konrad Viltersten Nov 3 '12 at 22:14
1  
I personally thought it was overly nice of slavik to ignore the fact that the OP's code isn't C++. –  Cubic Nov 3 '12 at 22:15
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My guess, based on the questions touch is that you're looking for the following code.

int main()
{
  ClassA[] as = {new ClassA(), new ClassA(), ... }
  ClassB[] bs = {new ClassB(), new ClassB(), ... }
}

But I'm shooting in the dark, a bit. :)

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You should make your question more specific, edit it and post what you've tried to do. If you mean to do something respecting oop-rules, the play looks like this:

#include<iostream>
#include<vector>
class A{
public:
  void fill_up_the_vector() { v=std::vector<int>(3); v[0]=0; v[1]=1; v[2]=4; }
  void add( a.add(i); ) { v.push_back(i); }
  void display_last() const { std::cout<<v[v.size()-1]; }
private:
  std::vector<int> v;
};

class B{
public:
  B(){ a.fill_up_the_vector(); }  // B just *instructs* A to fill up its vector.
  void add_value(int i) { a.add(i); }
  void display() const { a.display_last(); }
private:
  A a;
};

int main()
{
  B b;
  b.add_value(9);
  b.display(); // reads v through A.
}

Note that this example above is a bit different from what you've asked. I posted it since I think you sould keep in mind that according to OOP rules

  • you don't want to access values in A directly,
  • B should have a member with type A if you plan to access a value in A,
  • you're supposed to access a value in A through B if you have filled it up from B.

The other way to go is not OOP:

struct A{
  std::vector<int> v;
};

struct B{
  static void fill_A(A& a) const { a.v = std::vector<int>(3); a.v[0]=0; a.v[1]=1; a.v[2]=4; }
};

int main()
{
  A a;
  B::fill_A(a);
  a.v.push_back(9);
  std::cout << a.v[a.v.size()-1];
}

but this code is as horrible as it gets.

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