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I have an abstract class

public abstract class Integrator {
    public abstract Point integrate();
    public abstract Point function(Double x, Point y);
}

which is extended by

public abstract class Euler extends Integrator {
    public Point integrate() {
        ... // this calls function(x, y)
    }
}

public abstract class Central extends Integrator {
    public Point integrate() {
        ... // this calls function(x, y)
    }
}

which both implement integrate() differently. Now, the concrete classes which I instantiate are defined like so

public class EulerIVP extends Euler {
    public EulerIVP(...) { ... }

    public Point function(Double x, Point y) {
        ...
    }
}

public class CentralIVP extends Central {
    public CentralIVP(...) { ... }

    public Point function(Double x, Point y) {
        ...
    }
}

which both implement function() exactly the same way, but will use their parent's integrate(). Because Euler and Central are abstract it doesn't make sense for them to both extend an IVP class. So I was hoping I'd be able to do something like this

public class IVP<T extends Integrator> extends T {
    public IVP(...) { ... }
    public Point function(Double x, Point y) { ... }
}

Integrator eulerIntegrator = new IVP<Euler>(...);
Integrator centralIntegrator = new IVP<Central>(...);

But I can't because, I believe, T here would be a type not a class. Is there something similar I can do?

share|improve this question
    
If function() is the same for all, why not implement it in Integrator ? – jlordo Nov 3 '12 at 22:16
    
It is only the same for this particular example. I could have another class which extends Euler but has a different function – bountiful Nov 3 '12 at 22:18
    
I think you can use the factory design pattern to solve this problem. – Gilberto Torrezan Nov 3 '12 at 22:23
up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can use composition instead of inheritance. Something like:

public class IVP {
    private Integrator integrator;

    public IVP(Integrator integrator) {
        this.integrator = integrator;
    }

    public Point function(Double x, Point y) {
        // Calculate using integrator.integrate();
    }
}

and then make euler a non-abstract class:

IVP eulerIVP = new IVP(new Euler());
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I wanted to offer the same solution: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Composition_over_inheritance – Michał Ziober Nov 3 '12 at 22:24
    
But would this be possible if integrate() called function(x,y) of its child class? I've edited my question to make this clear. – bountiful Nov 3 '12 at 22:27
1  
@fophillips In that case, you could add a setIVP method to the integrator so that they can both refer to each other. – fgb Nov 3 '12 at 22:32
    
In the end I did it the other way around, and ensured all Integrators were constructed with an IVP. – bountiful Nov 4 '12 at 1:16

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