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I'm quite newbie in C and now I'm trying to implement basic generic linked list with 3 elements, each element will contain a different datatype value — int, char and double.

Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

struct node
{
    void* data;
    struct node* next;
};

struct node* BuildOneTwoThree()
{
    struct node* head   = NULL;
    struct node* second = NULL;
    struct node* third  = NULL;

    head    = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    second  = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    third   = (struct node*)malloc(sizeof(struct node));

    head->data = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int));
    (int*)(head->data) = 2;
    head->next = second;

    second->data = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char));
    (char*)second->data = 'b';
    second->next = third;

    third->data = (double*)malloc(sizeof(double));
    (double*)third->data = 5.6;
    third->next = NULL;

    return head;
}

int main(void)
{
    struct node* lst = BuildOneTwoThree();

    printf("%d\n", lst->data);
    printf("%c\n", lst->next->data);
    printf("%.2f\n", lst->next->next->data);

    return 0;
}

I have no problem with the first two elements, but when I try to assign a value of type double to the third element I get an error: «cannot convert from 'double' to 'double *'».

What is the reason for this error? Why don't I get the same error in case of int or char? And the most important question: how to fix this, how to assign a double value to the data field of the third element?

The problem string is «(double*)third->data = 5.6;».

Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are casting the pointer, but you need to derefernce it for the assignment, the assignment worked for the first two since the int and char were casted to pointers, it should be:

*((int*)(head->data)) = 2;
*((char*)(second->data)) = 'b';
*((double*)(third->data)) = 5.6;

Anyway, there should be warning for such a cast in first place.

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I still say it's silly to use pointers to store primitive types. –  Mark Reed Nov 4 '12 at 20:34

In your "working" examples, you're calling malloc to get a pointer to some newly-allocated space, and then immediately throwing that pointer away and replacing the pointer value with your integer or character value. That works more or less by accident because in most C implementations a pointer cell can hold an integer or char value, though you should be getting warnings. If you actually tried to dereference the data pointer after those assignments, you would probably get a crash and core dump.

You want to put the values at the place pointed to by the pointer, not in the pointer itself. Which means you need an extra *:

 *((double *)third->data) = 5.6;

The * in the (double *) typecast is part of the type name - "pointer to double". The cast says "take the value of third->data and interpret it as a pointer to double". The result is still a pointer, so when you assign to that, you are changing where the pointer points (and probably making it point somewhere meaningless). Instead, you want to assign a value to the place it already points, which is what the outer * does.

However, if you're only storing basic types like int, char, and double, you don't need to go through a pointer (and worry about the attendant memory management). You can just use a union:

struct node 
{
    struct node *next;
    union {
        char c;
        int  i;
        double d;
    } data;
 }

Then you would do e.g.

head->data.i = 2;
second->data.c = 'b';
third->data.d = 5.6;
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You can't assign the value to the pointer, you have to assign it to the object pointed (in the last case, a double - you only have space for one double).

So:

    ...
    head->data = (int*)malloc(sizeof(int));
    ((int*)(head->data))[0] = 2;
    head->next = second;

    second->data = (char*)malloc(sizeof(char));
    ((char*)second->data)[0] = 'b';
    second->next = third;

    third->data = (double*)malloc(2 * sizeof(double));
    ((double*)third->data)[0] = 5.6;
    ((double*)third->data)[1] = 3.1415;
    // We only allocated space for 2 doubles, so this line here would cause a crash
    // (or anyway, a data corruption)
    // ((double*)third->data)[2] = 666;
    third->next = NULL;

    return head;
}

int main(void)
{
    struct node* lst = BuildOneTwoThree();

    printf("%d\n", ((int *)lst->data)[0]);
    printf("%c\n", ((char *)lst->next->data)[0]);
    printf("%.2f\n", ((double *)lst->next->next->data)[0]);
    printf("%.2f\n", ((double *)lst->next->next->data)[1]);
    ...

returns:

2
b
5.60
3.14

BTW: with full warnings enabled, the compiler should have warned you that the first two assignments were risky (GCC considers them errors) and the third one unallowed (can't convert from a double to a pointer)

One more thing: when you use a struct payload this way, you have to consider that the data type that you actually stored in the payload itself is lost. So you can't, by inspecting an instance of your linked list, determine whether it is a char, an integer or a double. Worse, even checking the value might not be allowed and crash the program (suppose you stored a single byte, but try to read four or eight).

So you ought to also store an extra field in your structure holding an indicator (an enum maybe) of the original data type:

typedef enum
{
    TYPE_IS_CHAR,
    TYPE_IS_INT,
    TYPE_IS_FLOAT,
    TYPE_IS_DOUBLE,
    ...
} mytype_t;

struct node
{
    mytype_t type;
    void     *data;
    struct node *next;
}
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