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I'm attempting to inject a property using ninject. Given the two bindings in the ninject module below, I would expect the ConcreteDependency to be injected into B.
However, it seems that WhenInjectedInto doesn't consider the type being injected into, just the declaring type of the target (property in this case).

Is there a way to achieve the behaviour I expected?

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var kernel = new StandardKernel(new TestModule());
    var b = kernel.Get<B>();
    var c = kernel.Get<C>();
}

class TestModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        Bind<IDependency>().To<EmptyDependency>();
        Bind<IDependency>().To<ConcreteDependency>().WhenInjectedInto<B>();
    }
}

abstract class A
{
    [Inject]
    public IDependency Dependency { get; set; }
}

class B : A {}

class C : A {}

interface IDependency {}

class EmptyDependency : IDependency { }

class ConcreteDependency : IDependency { }
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How you register A, B and C into NInject? –  Cuong Le Nov 4 '12 at 8:40
    
You don't have to in Ninject. Since B and C are concrete classes they don't need to be registered explicitly. –  Gibsnag Nov 4 '12 at 23:40
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In order to check against a concrete type, you can use ParentContext.Plan.Type on the IRequest interface. This should give you the behaviour you expected from WhenInjectedInto. For example:

When(req => req.ParentContext.Plan.Type == typeof(B))
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You should use constructor injection instead of property injection if possible. This is a better technique, which is recommended by Mark Seeman, because makes dependencies required for object construction explicit and object signature via constructor is more expressive. Code should look like this:

    abstract class A
    {
        public IDependency Dependency { get; private set; }

        public A (IDependency dependency)
        {
            Dependency = dependency;
        }

    }

    class B : A
    {
        public B (IDependency dependency)
            : base(dependency)
        {

        }
    }

    class C : A
    {
        public C (IDependency dependency)
            : base(dependency)
        {

        }
    }

    interface IDependency { }

    class EmptyDependency : IDependency { }

    class ConcreteDependency : IDependency { }

Configuration will be the same as in you example. The following test passes

    [Test]
    public void TestSpecificBindingToObjectB()
    {
        var kernel = new StandardKernel(new TestModule());
        var b = kernel.Get<B>();
        var c = kernel.Get<C>();

        Assert.AreNotEqual(b.Dependency.GetType(), c.Dependency.GetType());
        Assert.AreEqual(typeof(ConcreteDependency), b.Dependency.GetType());
    }

If you have an optional dependency with default implementation and you are ok with decorating your classes with Inject attribute, you can can pull parent information from request, like this:

class TestModule : NinjectModule
{
    public override void Load()
    {
        Bind<IDependency>().To<EmptyDependency>();
        Bind<IDependency>().To<ConcreteDependency>().When(req =>req.ParentContext.Request.Service == typeof(B));
    }
}

Then the same test given above passes for your class hierarchy with property injection.

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1  
Thanks, but unfortunately I'd like to get it to work for property injection. The dependency, in this case, is something which can have a reasonable default value (the Empty Dependency) so I was moving it from constructor injection to property injection to avoid having too many constructor parameters. –  Gibsnag Nov 4 '12 at 23:39
1  
I attempted to use the When extension method with a predicate which would use the type being injected into, rather than the property's declaring type but couldn't work out how to get the necessary information from the IRequest. –  Gibsnag Nov 4 '12 at 23:44
    
I have updated my answer with respect to your case of optional dependency with default implementation –  Ilya Ivanov Nov 5 '12 at 10:08
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