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Are there any differences in execution time between constructors and initialization lists?(or is it just a matter of coding preference). I have a set of objects that needs to be created frequently and would like to know if there is any performance gain by using initialization lists instead of constructors.

If I were to create a million instances of class A and another million of class B which choice would be better(the objects represent packets generated within a network hence these numbers).

 class A {
   private:
     int a, b;

   public:
     A(int a_var, int b_var):a(a_var), b(b_var) {}; 
 };

 class B {
   private:
     int a, b;

   public:
     B(int a_var, int b_var) {
        a = a_var;
        b = b_var;
     }
};

If any of the constructors is faster than the other for primitive types(as in the example) will it be faster if a and b were to be replaced by types?

Type example:

 class AType {
   private:
     string a, b;

   public:
     AType(string a_var, string b_var):a(a_var), b(b_var) {}; 
};
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Why are you asking us? No clue what compiler you are using. Just measure it. –  Hans Passant Nov 3 '12 at 22:45
    
Hoped that someone knew the answer. I also wanted to know if is a good practice or not –  Sebi Nov 3 '12 at 22:47
    
If you can, set variables values using initialization list. It's better solution. –  Kacper Kołodziej Nov 3 '12 at 22:48

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The difference is for types with no trivial default constructor, which is called for you by compiler in your class B. Your class B is equivalent to:

 class B {
   private:
     SleepyInt a, b;

   public:
     // takes at least 20s
     B(int a_var, int b_var) : a(), b()
     //                      ^^^^^^^^^^ 
     {
        a = a_var;
        b = b_var;
     }
  };

If you do not place member variable or base class constructor in initialization list - ithe default constructor is called for them. int is basic type - its default constructor costs nothing - so no difference in your example, but for more complex types constructor+assignment might cost more than just constructing.

Some funny example, just to illustrate the difference:

class SleepyInt {
public:
  SleepyInt () { 
    std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds( 10000 ));  
  }
  SleepyInt (int i) {}
  SleepyInt & operator = (int i) { return *this; }
};

class A {
   private:
     SleepyInt a, b;

   public:
     A(int a_var, int b_var):a(a_var), b(b_var) {}; 
 };

 class B {
   private:
     SleepyInt a, b;

   public:
     // takes at least 20s
     B(int a_var, int b_var) {
        a = a_var;
        b = b_var;
     }
};
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Hmm you make a sleep in the constructor and that explains the delay. But what if we make only assignments(meaning that a and b are objects and they are only assigned in class A and B –  Sebi Nov 3 '12 at 22:57
    
@Sebi do you mean a and b are not members of A and B? –  PiotrNycz Nov 3 '12 at 23:00
    
Yes I was referring to a case where a and b are types and are already instantiated before being passed to those contructors –  Sebi Nov 3 '12 at 23:02
    
@Sebi I am not sure I understand. Could you update the question with new example? –  PiotrNycz Nov 3 '12 at 23:05
    
@Sebi, I'm not sure I understand you quite right, but there's no way apart from the type not having one to stop the compiler from calling the default constructor of your data members before the body of the constructor begins, except by using a member initializer. –  chris Nov 3 '12 at 23:07

It is commonly accepted practice to use initialization lists as opposed to assignment in a constructor, and there's a very good reason for that.

Initialization lists can be used to initialize both POD (Plain Old Data) and user-defined types. When initializing a POD type, the effect is exactly the same as an assignment operator, meaning there is no performance difference between initialization lists or assignment in a constructor for POD types.

When we consider non-POD types things get more interesting. Before the constructor is called, constructors for the parent class and then any contained members are invoked, and by default the no-argument constructor is called. Using an initialization list you are able to choose which constructor is called.

So to answer the question, there is a performance difference, but only when initializing non-POD types.

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There won't be a performance improvement if the types are built-in/intrinsic type.

That said:

Conclusion: All other things being equal, your code will run faster if you use initialization lists rather than assignment.

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If members are of more or less complex types, then the assignment initialization will first cause the default constructor call and then operator=, which may take longer.

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1  
It won't, actually, as a and b are ints. –  chris Nov 3 '12 at 22:46
1  
Only true for non-POD types. If the members are simple ints like in the example there is no difference. –  Yexo Nov 3 '12 at 22:46
    
How will types affect the execution speed? –  Sebi Nov 3 '12 at 22:47
    
I'm not sure what you mean by "replaced by types". I interpreted it as replaced by more complex types. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 3 '12 at 22:48
    
If a and b were to be replaced by objects –  Sebi Nov 3 '12 at 22:49

Initialization list is benefical reference types, member class objects, or const members. Otherwise it takes more time.

Look at my test code:

#include <iostream>
#include <ctime>

using namespace std;

class A{
    int a;
public:
    A(int a_):a(a_){}
};

class B{
    int b;
public:
    B(){
    }

    B(int b_){
        b=b_;
    }
};

class C{
    B b;
public:
    C(int c_):b(c_){
    }
};

class D{
    B b;
public:
    D(int d_){
        b=d_;
    }
};

int main()
{
    clock_t start1[10], start2[10], end1[10], end2[10];
    for(int j=0;j<10;j++){
        start1[j]=clock();
        for(int i=0;i<100000;i++){   
            A *newA=new A(i);
            delete newA;
        }
        end1[j]=clock();
        start2[j]=clock();
        for(int i=0;i<100000;i++){   
            B *newB=new B(i);
            delete newB;
        }
        end2[j]=clock();
    }
    double avg1=0, avg2=0;
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
        avg1+=(end1[i]-start1[i]);
        avg2+=(end2[i]-start2[i]);
    }
    cout << avg1/avg2 << endl;

    for(int j=0;j<10;j++){
        start1[j]=clock();
        for(int i=0;i<100000;i++){   
            C *newC=new C(i);
            delete newC;
        }
        end1[j]=clock();
        start2[j]=clock();
        for(int i=0;i<100000;i++){   
            D *newD=new D(i);
            delete newD;
        }
        end2[j]=clock();
    }
    avg1=avg2=0;
    for(int i=0;i<10;i++){
        avg1+=(end1[i]-start1[i]);
        avg2+=(end2[i]-start2[i]);
    }
    cout << avg1/avg2 << endl;

    system("pause");
    return 0;
}



Example outputs like this:

1.02391
0.934741

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